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Yamaha SRX/SZR on an unrestricted licence

Discussion in 'Bike Reviews, Questions and Suggestions' at netrider.net.au started by jd, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. Still 6 months till restrictions end but thinking winter may be a good time to buy so I'm starting my research early. Now I've looked at some of the 600cc parallel 4s and they certainly seem a sensible choice but I just can't get that excited about them. Yes they're fast but I don't see a point in paying for performance that I'm probably never going to use out on the road. I do however really like the looks of the Yamaha SRX-6, and thinking that being a single it should also be reliable and extremely easy to work on myself (is this a correct assumption or not?). The SZR660 is also an option, must admit I do like the idea of having an electric start (but guess I could get used to a kick-start). I'll mostly be using the bike for commuting and touring (but will certainly make the most of any twisties I come across) so is it possible to travel long distances on these bikes or is the engine vibration simply too harsh - and what sort of revs are they pulling at 100/110kph?. Also how cheap are these bikes to run/insure and is there much potential for modifying either bike for greater performance (engine, brakes, suspension etc.) when I decide that it's not fast enough. Finally I guess if anyone has any thoughts on why I should/shouldn't upgrade to a 600/660 single instead of a 4-cylinder 600 or a TRX850 I'd be interested to hear them.


     
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  2. Singles are an aquired taste. And it isn't vibration - its a treadmill workout for your nuts.

    There's no doubt that the extra horsepower and smoothness of multis are nice. The torque curve is completely different, however, and the rumble in your waters that comes from big single at low revs is pretty good. Not everyone's cup of tea, but I love it.

    I imagine that fiddling with suspension and brakes is much of a muchness regardless of whether you get a modern single or a multi. But why would you alter the suspension on an SZR? - Paoli forks and Brembo calipers are pretty good straight out of the box.

    If you want to tweak the engine, a single is hard to beat. Only one of everthing, one carby to play with (no balancing), one cam, one set of ports etc. Watercooling adds complexity, so the SRX would have the edge here over the SZR.

    Kickstarter? pfft. Technique is the key, and once you learn to kick a big single, you're a god amongst motorcyclists. All real men have a limp.

    However, if you're not a singlaholic, the TRX850 is a dam' fine machine - I'd happily park one in my shed.
     
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  3. This is not an unbiased reply. I have a passion for singles. But the question "why should I take a single over a 4" is about how you like a bike to feel, rather than which is "better".

    Singles are an aquired taste. And it isn't vibration - its a treadmill workout for your nuts.

    There's no doubt that the extra horsepower and smoothness of multis are nice. The torque curve is completely different, however, and the rumble in your waters that comes from big single at low revs is pretty good. Not everyone's cup of tea, but I love it.

    If you want to tweak the engine, a single is hard to beat. Only one of everthing, one carby to play with (no balancing), one cam, one set of ports etc. Watercooling adds complexity, so the SRX would have the edge here over the SZR. I imagine that fiddling with suspension and brakes is much of a muchness regardless of whether you get a modern single or a multi. But why would you alter the suspension on an SZR? - Paoli forks and Brembo calipers are pretty good straight out of the box.

    Kickstarter? pfft. Technique is the key, and once you learn to kick a big single, you're a god amongst motorcyclists. All real men have a limp.

    However, if you're not a singlaholic, the TRX850 is a dam' fine machine - I'd happily park one in my shed.
     
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  4. I understand exactly what you mean about not being able to get excited by 600cc four's. That was the primary motivation for me to get an SZR660.

    The SRX would be easy to work on, but the SZR is fairly complex I think, with watercooling and an unusual dry-sump engine. I've changed the oil on wet sump bikes, but the SZR kind of scare me.

    What sort of revs at 100/110? Red-line is at 7250rpm on the SZR. It has fairly tall gearing in top, only 5 speed, but 180km/h in top, so 110km/h comes up at 4250rpm. It's a funny sort of engine, in that higher or lower revs doesn't actually mean more vibes. The most vibration is at exactly 110km/h.

    It's noticeable for sure, although a lot of owners don't mind it. You have to ride one to make up your mind. The bike's certainly capable of long distances, its the rider who may not be able to take it.

    I haven't owned it all that long, but by sportsbike standards it's definetly cheap to run. Much cheaper than a four would be. Uses reasonable petrol. Single cylinder is the easiest and cheapest to service.

    Performance modification is as cheap and easy as any bike.
     
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  5. Everything the chairman says is true grasshopper.

    Personally I'd go for the TRX850. There were none in my price range when I upgraded but I would've liked one.

    Nonetheless, the ER-5 is ideal for commuting and touring with the odd bit of twisties as are many bikes. ZZR600, ER-6, VFR800 all spring to mind. :grin: If you like them nude, there's always the Hornet or the SV650. There must be a few Hyosungs around by now as well. :)
     
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  6. SRX6!

    I agree with you on inline-4's being boring. Sure, they go fast, but everyone's got one, and you're going into licence losing territory in the fun rev range even staying in the first few gears. Personally, i love my SRX6, fantastic little bike. Never ridden an SZR660, but i'd imagine they'd have a lot more power and torque (extra 60cc, watercooled, more racing oriented engine).

    Good points about the SRX6:
    * very easy to work on. no water cooling, starter motor to worry about. easy access to pretty much everything
    * bullet proof engines. so simple there's not much that can go wrong
    * easy to get a good 85-87 jap import with ~20k on the clock for around $4k (http://www.importmc.com.au bring them in all the time)
    * nice and light so they're easy to throw around in the corners
    * easy to get genuine yamaha parts - they brought them into aus in 86/87 (at least)
    * very easy to start, for a kickstart only bike (i can easily start mine with my hand - never kicks back). Plus, kickstarting a bike makes you look macho! (until you do it with the bike in first and it drops on top of you, trapping you, that is :) )
    * lots of people comment on how cool your bike is and say they've never seen one before
    * english service and user manuals, and parts lists available
    * don't buy oggy knobs, just spare indicator lenses - they take the impact if you drop it!
    * good for shortarses, as it's around the size of a CBR250 (but much narrower)

    Things that aren't so good:
    * stock exhaust is terribly restrictive and slipons are hard to get. Supertrapp make one, but it's very loud. custom job is probably the best option (around $500, plus what it'll cost to get it dyno'd)
    * not so good for long distances - narrow seat and vibes (wearing cycling knicks under your jeans / leathers pretty much makes this disappear)
    * lack of a screen can be a bit annoying, but you could get an aftermarket one no doubt.
    * not all that much power, although this should change once you get another exhaust.
    * kick start can be a pain if you flood it, or if there's something wrong. on the upside, you're never going to have to push start it.
    * not so good for tall people - i'm about 180cm and i don't think anyone much taller than me would like the SRX

    Putting a new exhaust on it makes it sound better, gives more power / torque, and reduces the vibrations. ("see honey, it's 3 for the price of 1! i'd be crazy not to spend the money on my bike!")

    At 100km/h, the i sit on around 3.9k in 5th gear (usable but chunky power at 2.5k, redlines at 6.5-7k). best rev range is around 3.5-5.5k. I generally get around 220kms out of 11-12 litres of fuel. As for insurance, QBE are doing full comprehensive for me for $260 a year (rating 3, over 25), which seems ok to me.

    There are lots of SRX modders at the Thumperpage forums - popular mods seem to include FZR600 front and rear end swaps (frear end needs some fabrication), new exhausts, big bores etc. The people on thumperpage really know their stuff.

    Another option would be to make a motard - get an XT600 or similar (which has an almost identical to the SRX, but an electric start - TT600 if you want to stay with the kick-only), chuck some smaller road wheels and tyres on. you can still do all the normal mods like braided brake lines, exhausts, body work etc. The big bonus is they're fun to ride! very quick steering, you can lean them over twice as far as you feel you should be able to, and they're easy to wheelie! My next bike (which is a fair way off yet) is most likely going to be a motard.

    Anyway, hope that helped. Take as many different bikes for test rides as you can, and if you're up in brisbane, let me know and i'll show you my SRX.

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
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  7. hey thats a nice looking bike
    anyways... im not too sure if this would help but Johnny O rides a sachs
    and this is a single as well
    and from what i heard is a very very good bike..
    u can ask the girls who took one on there trip... nothing but praise for it
    i personally like it as well
    its not very sporty as the one ur looking at but its a single and its inte 600ish class
    contact johnny o for more info
     
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  8. TRX850 all the way! :cool:
    I'd take one over a single any day, especially if you are serious about the touring part. My SZR was an absolute pain in the bollocks to ride all day!! Constant revs at highway speeds leads to all kinds of body parts going numb after a while. :LOL:
    A friend of mine had a TRX and it was a beaut bike to ride. It feels kind of small but has lovely torquey power and sweet handling to seal the deal. The other bonus is that they aren't all that expensive and don't cost that much to insure either.
     
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  9. That's gotta be Chairman's new sig! :LOL:
     
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  10. Thanks for all the detailed replies people, definately given me something to think about over the next few months. I do like the idea of a single, cheap to run yet still more than fast enough through the twisities (straight line speed's not really that important to me as long as I can overtake safely). However I think the biggest factor may be that SRX/SZRs aren't that easy to find in Victoria, but TRXs seem reasonably common. Still, doesn't sound like I'll be disappointed whatever I choose so I guess I'll just have to see what I can find.
     
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