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Why go an aftermarket exhaust?

Discussion in 'Technical and Troubleshooting Torque' at netrider.net.au started by stu'sbeast, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. G'day all,
    This maybe a stupid question but what are the reasons for going an aftermarket exhaust and what makes one brand better than the other?

    I realise that they flow more freely letting your engine breath better and genrally sound better but is that all?
    Titanium, Carbon fibre, which one, why? Are there any benefits other than a little weight saving?

    Cheers for the info



    Stu
     
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  2. This may be a :popcorn: exercise but I for one will be interested in reading the diverse opinions of the membership.
     
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  3. :popcorn: +1 this is going to be epic!
     
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  4. I'm older, I grew up when bikes weren't almost totally quiet. I fit aftermarket exhausts because I like to be able to hear the exhaust over the mechanical noises of the motor, basically that's what I'm used to and I admit to being a creature of habit.
     
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  5. Think this is a broad view and not far off the mark...

    Reason 1: Noise (either exhaust note, volume or both)
    Reason 2: Increase in performance (usually with other mods but increases are usally minimal but every bit counts for some)
    Reason 3: Looks (yep some stock exhausts are a shocker! Suzuki Bandit has one the size of a 44 gallon drum)

    Reason 4 Possibility of increase noise giving more presence amoungst traffic.. (never to be relied on!)

    Reasons 1, 2 & 3 are real reasons.
    Reason 4 although with a little merrit, mainly used to justify reasons 1, 2 & 3.
     
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  6. Sound (quantity and/or quality; they're independent of one another)
    Aesthetics
    Weight (EURO3 and EURO4 mufflers are huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge)
    Physical size (EURO3 and EURO4 mufflers are huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge)
    Packaging (e.g. Bike with factory high-mount/undertail exhausts modified with a low-mount or under-engine GP style muffler from aftermarket)
    Customisation/personalisation/individuality

    Plenty of motivations to replace the muffler with something else.

    Edit: I should note, not all aftermarket mufflers are created equal. There're replacement mufflers which are a little louder but still comply with noise and (not really applicable here) emissions laws which sound a little nicer and look a little nicer but won't deafen people in neighbouring suburbs. Annnnd then at the other end of the spectrum, there are the race mufflers which are barely even comply with the noise limits of a private racetrack.
     
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  7. A lot of it is based in history. Older bikes (pre mid 90s) had quite heavy, restrictive and cheap exhaust systems. Companies did very little research into the performance aspect of exhaust systems and basically only put something on there to get through compliance. Exhaust note was also part of it. A lot of factory systems were overkill.

    These days there is much less merit. Manufactures are building better quality systems that are not that far of best performance. They are also aware of exhaust not vs total noise. Of course this applies more the more expensive and high performance the bike.

    There is still some merit these days. More basic bikes are likely to benefit more from a performance perspective. The w800 comes to mind here. Also, some bikes are still stupidly quiet. Others have cheap or ugly systems from the factory.
     
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  8. There's another thread called "loud pipes yada yada"
    But to answer your question the best pipe is the one you like the sound of that you can afford.
    But remember it's all about the SUCK-BANG-BLOW
    Suck = Air in. Air filter, jetting.
    Bang = Timing. ECU, Power Commander. Power jet.... whateva you prefer.
    Blow = Exhaust
    Just an exhaust will not gain any real power. It will move it around so it feel quicker. Usual gains are in the top range at the expense of losing some off the bottom.
    Putting in a K&N air filter and a pipe will gain you around 5 to 7%
    Adding a tuning device like a power commander will bring that up to about 10%
     
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  9. I have a Stainless pipe with titanium exhaust on the DRZ.
    Sound isnt a lot louder, performance gain is minor but there, weight saving is noticable before you put it on the bike, then I cant tell how much it weighs, the full titanium pipe was about $50 more and saved another 500grams or so, worth it if youre racing, Not if you expect to fall over and dint the pipe, SS is much easier to fix than titanium..
    GSX has a megacycle, noticable weight saving over standard, better performance and Sounds heaps better.
    Bub Bad dogs on the Harley, I picked them up from Ness when I was in the US, at the time they were the number 1 performance pipe for Harleys, without being ridiculously loud. They even look legal, and they sound great.
     
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  10. I'll chime in on the brands.
    Different brands, different quality. FMF is a good brand but their pipes require repacking, staintune is an even better brand that is Australian made which to be is a mega plus in itself, and their pipes need no maintenance other than regular cleaning.
     
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  11. its not all that simple bretto, different exhausts can be used to alter how the engine delivers its power. depending on the header pipe and muffler length, you can choose to boost any area of the engines rpm range.

    speaking from what i know (single cylinder 4 stroke bikes), a shorter header pipe will work better in high rpms. a long header pipe is better for bottom end grunt but doesnt work as well in the top end.

    you have the choice of which style of header you are after, as you can then tailor the bike to your riding style or disipline. or if you're really pro, the different tracks you ride.

    i just bought an exhaust for my race bike, full system made from stainless. i didnt choose titanium as the benefits arent that great, just a bit of weight savings really. and i would likely crash and smash it off.

    [​IMG]

    if you look to the header pipe, you will see the new design that good single cylinder exhaust manufacturers are starting to use. it supposedly gives the bottom end of a long tube header, but the top end and over-rev of a short one. also reduces noise.

    i was skeptical at first but having to time to rejet before racing i was surprised. more power everywhere, and would pull an extra 1000rpm of usable power in the top end. i havent seen this on a 4 cylinder bike so it may just be for singles.

    ps. staintune are utter crap that are only good if you like polishing. they cannot design a header pipe that works properly either, all they do is make them bigger. which doesnt always work.
     
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  12. Is the same true for the mid pipe (muffler to head pipe connection), will a nice and long mid pipe give me good bottom-end grunt?
    looking to emphasize the bottom to mid range power of my bike as much as possible, since this is where the power band of my bike is at, with torque being more important than horses. not planning to do serious racing with it.
     
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  13. It's usually better to make torque in the mid to upper range and take advantage of your gearing.
     
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  14. Carbon pipes are traffic cop magnets - and an almost certain EPA notification and noise fail. Be warned if you go this option.
     
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  15. Looks and sound. The pipes on all the new sports bikes look crapola
     
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  16. Personally -

    Main Reason - Sound: To let cagers know that there is a bike close by.
    Second - Sound: Nothing like that rumble of the engine that I'm riding!
    Thirdly - Looks: Not very important but hey, they look much better than those ugly stock ones.

    BTW I ride a Yamaha V-Star 650 Custom and have V&H Cruzers exhausts.
     
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  17. Pretty much covered it.

    Weight. Looks. Sound. Performance. Bling factor if you have a designer label. Akrapovic probably make the best exhausts in the world, at least by reputation. Good street cred there. Yoshimura got rich on them, and make some pretty good systems.

    There are some pretty cheap and nasty systems out there. They do nothing for performance. Some are actually quite light, but the quality of materials and construction can be just shit! If it looks like it was stuck together by a few 15 years olds in an alley in Singapore, don't buy it.
     
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  18. Cheers for all the replys, was pretty much what I thought, thanks.
    You can't beat the sweet sound of a nice exhaust, an who doesn't like a bit of bling!!!!
     
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  19. Couldn't have worded it better myself! =D>
     
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  20. Did no one mention the price difference in replacing an original exhaust compared to replacing an after market exhaust after a drop?
     
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