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When buying a bike

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by hyper24, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. When buying a bike, what checks should be done in regards to rego.



    It has number plates but the rego sticker has gone missing... go figure?, do bikes have engine numbers and chassis numbers just like cars and can i call up vic roads with these to get them verified.
    Just incase maybe he put different plates on the bike.
    Im paranoid yes but better to be safe then sorry.
     
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  2. Yes, bikes have both engine numbers and vin numbers. You need both in order for Vic Roads to do a check for you.

    Also, you should get another rego sticker because you can get fined if the cops are tight or ask to see it and you can't produce it.
     
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  3. get the bike checked by a machanic.
    i got screwed big time... am still kicking my self and it's hard for me to enjoy the ride as i'm spending a lot of the looking for problems (bike hypercondriac)

    hopefully will have a new bike early in the new year :grin:
     
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  4. Also another question, if the bike is transferred without a road worthy does the rego still transfer over?
     
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  5. No. Rego cannot be transfered without a roadworthy. If buying the bike without rego (no RWC will mean no rego) then you will need paperwork to prove your ownership of the bike when you do want to have it registered. Check the vicroads website for suitable paperwork, but I think a DIY contract of sale will do the job. :)
     
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  6. Hey guys, maybe this might be some help... I have only recently obtained my L's and bought my first road bike so I have been asking as many questions and trying to learn as much as I can both on and off the bike.

    My local mechanic that does all the work on my bike has been a wealth of knowledge and it certainly paid off when going to choose a bike because when speaking to him before I did so he told me there were some types of bikes that wouldn't be as easy for him to work on which inevitably means that anytime the bike is at the workshop it is probably going to take longer to fix, harder to get parts, be more expensive etc.

    Certainly saved me a lot of time and money!
     
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