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What are they teaching learners these days?

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by VTRBob, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. I had the misfortune today to follow, I'm only hoping a newly promoted P plate rider, on a ZZR250 from Lansvale and 2/3rds along Woodville Rd before I thankfully turned off.

    In dozens of lane changes both myself and my GF observed and commented that this rider did NOT do one head check !
    His UP gear changes consisted of, clutch in change gear and dump the clutch, the rough changes where both embarrassing to watch and causing the bike to lurch and rider to jerk backwards every gear change.
    Stopping at a set of lights was almost as bad .... It didn't matter what gear he was in or what speed, but as soon as the lights started there cycle from orange, he would pull the clutch in shift down to neutral, let the clutch back out an 'coast' up to the lights ... sometimes this would be 200mtrs or more !
    Dont even ask me about stopping at the lights .. both feet down and still had trouble keeping the bike balanced.

    I hate to say it, but watching this guy gave me only one thought, and as much as I hate to say it , an accident waiting to happen with his lack off demonstrated skills for a "P" plate rider.



    I would have loved to have tried to get his attention and pull over to ask if he had any riding buddies to help him along etc, but I did not want to endanger him or anyone else by trying to get my ute close enough without seeming threatening etc, his riding and lane changing was just too erratic.

    I'd love to know how he passed his test while not being able to 'smoothly' change gears and selecting neutral whilst coming to a stop.
     
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  2. My flatmate and his friends all got their p's just earlier, one of them had only ridden 400km and still passed. I think he hired a cb250 because he was worried about passing on his megelli.

    Test is too easy.
     
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  3. I see it quite often and it's not always noobs either.

    From my experience I feel the learners course at Motorcycle Motion in Moorabin was very good with a broad range of skills taught. Having said that I couldn't understand how most of the skills we learnt weren't in the test.
    In fact the 'Full's' test itself was somewhat easier than the L cert.

    I still can't get my head around the fact that you can do a few hours in a carpark never leaving second gear and not go over 20km then go out and dodge cars at full speed unsupervised.

    For me I was lucky my white knuckles didn't let me do anything stupid.
     
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  4. Hi,

    I did my L"s at HART and they did teach us about gear changes, changing down for stoping at lights etc so quite good there.

    However in no way did it prepare you for the road IMO. As above never out of second or over 30. There was a lot of discussion about what to watch for on the road but without doing it in practice. The first time a car went past me I just about wet myself. Thankfully 6 weeks in and thanks to this site mainly I know all the things that I need to practice and keep practicing.

    The test was easy to pass with the exception of the slow riding bit which everyone had issues with. I practice my slow ridding everyday on the way to work I really want to master it.

    I would have to say that the course and test do not prepare you for actual ridding on the road but not sure what the alternative is that would not take a lot longer and be significantly more expensive.

    Cheers Jeremy
     
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  5. + 1 for motorcycle motion!! Did both my test and lessons there and they gave me do much more info about riding practically on roads!!
     
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  6. I hate to say it, but I see experienced riders pulling pretty dumb/dangerous stunts in traffic too. No different to car drivers, so I guess the more experienced you get, the 'clever-er' the stunts?

    Not a good time though for bad habits to begin occuring when you're on your P's.
     
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  7. should make the vic ride compulsory,
    that was the most ive learnt about roadcraft, and it as instructed on the road - not a safe environment (well mostly quiet roads)
     
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  8. In answer to the thread title "What are they teaching learners these days?". The answer is 'Nothing'.

    When I fancied getting my learner license I popped down to the local RTA with no booking. Pressed a few buttons on a computer screen, paid some money, and walked out with the letters 'R LRN' printed on my drivers license...
     
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  9. With drivers license, they teach learners how to pass a test, not drive a car.
     
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  10. Depends on who you go through. I think I'd better not spell out my prospective future employer's entire learn-to-ride curriculum, but it's pretty comprehensive. All the faults and mistakes mentioned in the OP would have been noticed and addressed before he ever got on the road. If he went back to doing them once he was away from us, well...

    I've seen a few frightening things on the road just since I started doing the instructor's course, because I'm looking for them now. But the incompetence of some riders is truly frightening.
     
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  11. Maybe we shouldnt rely on anything related to the road administration for road education.

    How to inspire new riders to seek further education may be a better approach.
     
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  12. I did my two day course in Brisbane. Day one was low speed skills and day two was on the open road in a group and as pairs with the instructor. I was commuting the next day.

    I agree it is way too fast and not enough training but at least we got on the road at reasonable speeds!

    Tim.
     
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  13. The question is not what are they teaching learners these days... The question is why are they passing people like this?

    Scooters now have to do the pre-learner course as well, unless you're in a regional area which doesn't hold pre-learner courses.
     
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  14. Regional area. And immediately I did a two day training course because I'm not a complete idiot.
     
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  15. was 5 people in my L plates Test. and around8 in my P's test. both were awesome. spent about 7 hours riding around doing his tests before the guy walked over and said we all passed... then again i guess it comes down to the rider. some people as harsh as this sounds - are like a fish out of water - when it comes to riding a bike. some naturally good at it, some are not.
     
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  16. I was always surprised about the lack of training required to obtain a MB licence here in Australia. I did my course at HART Kilsyth 15 years ago. We did a weekend course with the test at the end. Passed with flying colours (had my German licence at that stage for over 10 years) and was free to go on the road. Didn't have to have Ls or Ps, as I was over 25 and had my licence (cage) for over 5 years, but was restricted to 250s for 1 year.

    When I did my licence in Germany 10 years earlier, we did learn to ride on a car park with an instructor, then went on the road with the instructor in the car behind us, communicating via wireless radio (one way only). We had to do a certain number of hours (not as many as with the car here, I think it was about 10), then we did a road test, including slow riding, riding a figure 8, emergency breaking, etc. At the end, we were reasonable newbies, and it didn't cost the world either. Anyway, if you want to ride, you should have the money to pay for a bike, insurance, gear and training imo.
     
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  17. There were people in my class that passed who in my opinion were definitely not safe.
    However their points score said otherwise.
    The instructors would know this so maybe they should have the ability to just say no ??
     
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  18. theres a lot of people riding motorbikes out there that don't have licences.
    a P plate could be displayed to not draw attention to the fact that he dose'nt know how to ride the thing yet.
    can't just assume he was tested and passed somewhere.
     
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  19. can and do.
    what instructor wants you on his conscience
     
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  20. Fair point and nice to know
     
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