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[WA] Sunday Times dissects the death of a rider...

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by incitatus, Nov 6, 2006.

  1. The Sunday Times newspaper ran a major feature on Sunday regarding the death of a 22yo rider killed in a head-on with a car while overtaking another bike on a bend at 180. I believe it should be compulsory reading for everybody on a bike. It was not a single article, it was a series of pieces spread throughout the paper, each piece independently describing the impact from a different perspective, the grieving and broken parents, the ‘other rider’, the driver of the car, a passenger in the car, a deeply traumatized little 9yo girl in the car, the first cop at the scene, and even the undertaker who removed the body.

    This was not an ‘accident’ in any sense of the word, it was 180kph on a public road, and so many people are deeply affected, with lives at the very least blighted, others ruined forever. I wish nobody ill, and try very hard not to be judgmental, but when the real impact is laid bare for all to see like this it is hard to see the dead rider as the victim, it is all the innocents who are the victims of a completely pointless act of selfishness, a little girl should not have to face death coming through the windscreen of her parents car.



    The rider of the other bike was doing 160 at the time, and said that it had changed him forever, he said that he just didn’t know how ignorant he was, and that it would be difficult or impossible to change anybody’s view until they had experienced what he had, when it was already too late. I am afraid he is correct, and it saddens me deeply to think of the lives out there that are just waiting to be ruined and destroyed in the name of 'fun' and 'freedom'.
     
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  2. I agree 100% inci, it is very hard indeed to see him as anything other than a fool. A fool who paid the ultimate price, and unfortunately affected so many innocent people.

    I thought it was an interesting set of articles and reasonable well written considering it is the Sunday Times who are not exactly known for their journalistic skills.

    I hate to be one of those people who whinge about how bikers have such a bad name....but i just cant help but think that a big reason this got so much media coverage is because it was one of those aweful motorbike riders. Would the same coverage occur if it was just another car accident? I doubt it.

    But thats really besides the point. It really was a tragic set of circumstances. I feel for all involved, especially the innocent ones left behind to deal with it for the rest of their lives.

    It happened on such a bloody aweful, dangerous section of road too. It would be nice if the government were able to make something possitive out of this and fix the road. But that is unlikely, it is far easier to only look at the silly rider.
     
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  3. When your 22yo fun & freedom are big on your list of activities, last on your list would be getting up on a Sunday and reading newspaper articles, The Sunday Times can do all write ups it likes, it wont make a scrap of difference in the way young people ride their bikes, no matter what tragedies have occurred on the roads..
    Rider education is about the only time there is an opportunity to talk sense into any riders, they are there and need something and so they are a captive audience, what gets noted in a young riders mind then is about the best anyone can do.
    Just like all media outlets The Sunday Times and their choice of stories & coverage is for their own benefit - ratings, circulation numbers and advertising dollars are what it’s about.
     
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  4. Does anyone know if these acticles are online?

    Wouldn't mind a read of it.
     
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  6. This event is tragic, but I sense it is just being used to paint motorcycles in a bad light. We are all tarred by the same brush.

    Cars kill a lot more innocent bystanders rather than just emotionally scar them.

    And clearly I have little respect for the tabloid called "The Sunday Times".

    Sounds like the guy involved did do something pretty silly though and paid the ultimate price.
     
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  7. I'm new to riding, so ultimately I think I can provide a perspective fresher and with less bias than one of a seasoned rider.

    I'm seriously tired of the motorcyclist and the stupid victim mentality that many of you have, you seem to try to excuse and distance yourselves from what you enjoy. So instead of saying 'damn cagers are the enemy' and 'we all get tarred with the same brush' perhaps you should embrace motorcycling, good or bad along with it's consequences. I think phrases like that are a cop-out and detract from the reality.

    It is pretty clear that this person going 180 on the wrong side of has affected so many lives, and maybe it's time for motorcyclists realise this. For the most part, motorcycling is a selfish pursuit, it's all about me and my bike and fcuk those cagers, and the newspapers that report our deaths. If motorcyclists weren't so insular and defensive then maybe the rest of this country would come to understand us a little better.

    The facts are, this guy caused all of these events, there is no point trying to deflect away from that and say "damn cages", riders put themselves out there because they push the boundaries, and they shouldn't biatch and moan when criticized.

    Pushing ones limits is fine, but if you affect so many lives in the process, don't go all defensive. It really is pathetic. 180 on the wrong side of the road is stupid, and darwins theory could not be more apt on this occasion. I feel for the family, the people in the car and especially the little girl.

    Save it for the track you selfish heroes.

    -Dan
     
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  8. I read the articles in detail.

    The sunday times is having a bit of a publicity push on the road toll mainly because it has equalled last years toll and it's only early november.

    But you have to read the article to understand that last years road toll was very low and that 2006 looks to be about the same as 2004, 2003 etc.
    What I found alarming was the amount of bike riders who where part of the toll, 27 of the 164. Roughly a sixth. How many bike riders are there to cages? Not 1 to 6 that is for sure. Motorbike riders are well and truly over represented in the road toll.
    So is the sunday times doing the right thing with this article? It seems that the media is targeting bike riders atm. There was a story on the 6.00 news about motobikes with false/hidden/modified number plates all to avoid speed cameras now that they have this new rear pointed camera.

    Then there was the story of the 22 year old rider done for 208kmh who boasted that he does it all the time and faster, up to 260kmh. They showed images of a web site forum for bikers (not this one) where members where talking/bragging about there go fast stories.

    Yes, im pretty sure the media is out to paint motorcyclists in a bad light.
    But do motorcyclists deserve that?

    Well ask mister and missus average motorist who are well used to being passed by motorbikes daily at 30-40kmh over the speed limit. The sunday times is writing to please the majority, its readers with stories that they think the average motorist wants to read. Bikers are being used as a scape goat to blame for this "high" road toll.

    I just wonder what the next story the sunday times/west australian/channel what ever news is going to run on motorbikers next? Will they do the old "bikers doing wheelies thru multinovas' or bikers being clocked doing 90kmh thru 40kmh school zones again? Or maybe another 200kmh+ on a quiet section of empty highway again. maybe all of the above?
     
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  9. This is so true. If this was two cars having a head on, each travelling at 100kph, pretty much everyone would be dead and there'd be no survivors.

    If one of the vehicles was a truck, then it's almost certain death for any other vehicle occupants.

    Oh, but now it's a motorbike. Of course he's acting selfishly, but now we have a massive run of sob-stories about how emotionally impacted everyone else is. Let's ignore the obvious that if the oncoming vehicle was anything other than a bike that a whole lot more people would be dead, and we'd be writing obituaries and not stories about people's lives after the crash.

    For every person, other than the rider, killed by a motorcycle there's about 100 other people killed by cars/trucks, and so on.

    Where's the balance here?
     
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  10. Regardless of what you think of the Sunday Times I think articles like this are still pretty valid, sounds like a hell of a waste to me. Remember that it's not only 23 year olds who hit the 180km mark, there are plenty of older guys who are older and wiser, but have an uncanny ability to short circuit their common sense. There's a part of me that hears that someone was doing something stupid like that and died and I think "thank christ for that' as it's one less w@nker I'll have to deal with", but I can't help but feel sorry for the people they leave behind.

    I do agree that the way a rider/driver learns to drive has a huge effect on the way they travel for years to come, but feedback from their peers can't hurt either. At the end of the day we're all responsible for our own safety or lack of it, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't let your mate know if he's being a tool.
     
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  11. Oh dear....









    And what's that down there? TRIPLE POST? That's a first for me :cry: :oops: :?
     
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  12. :WStupid: :roll:





    Stupid errors *mumblebitchgroan*
     
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  13. I read the articles in detail.

    The sunday times is having a bit of a publicity push on the road toll mainly because it has equalled last years toll and it's only early november.

    But you have to read the article to understand that last years road toll was very low and that 2006 looks to be about the same as 2004, 2003 etc.
    What I found alarming was the amount of bike riders who where part of the toll, 27 of the 164. Roughly a sixth. How many bike riders are there to cages? Not 1 to 6 that is for sure. Motorbike riders are well and truly over represented in the road toll.
    So is the sunday times doing the right thing with this article? It seems that the media is targeting bike riders atm. There was a story on the 6.00 news about motobikes with false/hidden/modified number plates all to avoid speed cameras now that they have this new rear pointed camera.

    Then there was the story of the 22 year old rider done for 208kmh who boasted that he does it all the time and faster, up to 260kmh. They showed images of a web site forum for bikers (not this one) where members where talking/bragging about there go fast stories.

    Yes, im pretty sure the media is out to paint motorcyclists in a bad light.
    But do motorcyclists deserve that?

    Well ask mister and missus average motorist who are well used to being passed by motorbikes daily at 30-40kmh over the speed limit. The sunday times is writing to please the majority, its readers with stories that they think the average motorist wants to read. Bikers are being used as a scape goat to blame for this "high" road toll.

    I just wonder what the next story the sunday times/west australian/channel what ever news is going to run on motorbikers next? Will they do the old "bikers doing wheelies thru multinovas' or bikers being clocked doing 90kmh thru 40kmh school zones again? Or maybe another 200kmh+ on a quiet section of empty highway again. maybe all of the above? Or something new that they havent done before? A story on bikers web sites perhaps?
     
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  14. It's already been printed, that 'next' story, it was the one about the two blokes riding trail bikes saturday night on the verge, drunk, at high speed with no lights, no protective clothing, and no helmets. Only one of them survived when they collided head on.

    Regardless of the fact that the Sunday Times is a rag, they don't make up deaths. We as riders really can't whinge about bad press when we continue to crap in our own nest. By the way, there was way more in the Sunday Times about the new tighter 'hoon' laws, and 'P' plate car casualties, than there was about motorcycles. If you actually read the string of articles about the rider killed, you will see it is not about 'bad bikers', it is about the human devastation that any road death brings, and could just as easily have been about the 'P' plate driver killed yesterday.
     
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  15. Yeah, we can all bag out occasional person who twists the wrist, or plants the foot. For the most part (not always) these people kill themselves. With regards to the police officers, ambulance officers, and coroner, and whomever, the jobs of these people are far, far greater than dealing with an average of 1 motorist fatality state-wide per day. They're dealing with junkies, people who stab each other, injuries and deaths sustained through an absolute multitude of possibilities.

    What I would like to see instead would be a series of article about families destroyed by government legalised alcohol abuse, about government legalised gambling (pokies) and the children growing up in such circumstances. Stories about government legalised tobacco and all the correspondent health issues and what that really does to people. Heck, what about the government funded poverty-inducing socio-economic problem of the single-mother-pension baby-factory dependency syndrome?

    Look, (almost) every life is precious, but the amount of demonising that goes on about traffic is totally out of proportion to what's going on in the rest of the world.

    Fact: (Almost) nobody who gets on a bike or behind the wheel of a car wants to go out and kill themselves, but enjoying that unique symbiosis of man and machine is addictive.
    Fact: Nobody wants to get into a gambling addiction and lose everything, house, propery, personal effects, spouse, kids, etc
    Fact: Nobody wants to become addicted to alcohol
    Fact: Even though addicted to cigarettes, nobody really WANTS to be addicted to them, and they certainly don't want the various forms of cancer that they're almost certain to succumb to.

    Every single one of the above conditions is psychological. Every single one of the above conditions can be viewed as selfish by the individual. Every single one of the above conditions can have devastating effects.

    Why do all the other conditions have support networks, and yet traffic based conditions are treated with the utmost contempt and punitive manner by the media and the government, while all others are effectively legalised, tolerated, and paid for by the taxpayer (paid for referring to the various support mechanisms to pick up the pieces afterwards)?
     
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  16. The road toll is a joke. Hundreds more die every day through obesity, alcoholism and smoking.
    Yet you don't see anyone limiting the amount of food or alcohol people can shove down their traps.
    When you consider that about 1600 out of 20 million die on our roads every year, it's actually a very tiny number. 1 in 12,500 roughly.
    By contrast obesity related illness kills about 5600 per year.
     
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  17. How naive.

    No-one is saying this is not a tragedy, nor condoning the guys actions. It was stupid. But we as a subculture of society suffer disproportionately from these sorts of stories as most paint us in a negative light.

    The Sunday Times doesn't care about these people or us. They just want to sell newspapers.

    My family has been touched by the selfish actions of others. It wasn't emotional anguish. It wasn't a motorcyclist. It was a car that killed my cousin while waiting at a bus stop. The boy waiting with her wasn't emotionally traumatised. He was killed.

    I would hardly called commuting to work on my bike a selfish pursuit.
     
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  18. In 1992 it was estimated that smoking caused 18,920 deaths and the road toll was 2066. These days about 10% of fatalities are motorcyclists.

    Compare 200 deaths to nearly 20,000. Who is being victimised?

    In my past life I did cancer research. The fact that cigarettes are allowed to be sold is a crime. They are highly addictive, carcinogen packed, sticks of death.
     
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  19. Motorcycles do attract more than there fair share of fools. I have no doubt about that.

    That may not be a popular comment on a motorcycling forum, but i think its true. The fact is that motorcycles can be a cheap way for people to go very fast. Often much faster than someone could in a regular car.

    The article which stated motorcyclists accounted for 22% (or twenty something) of road deaths this year. Now as inci said, this is fact, no newspaper makes this kind of thin up. This is a truely terrible statistic. I dont know the percentage of motorcyclists that make up total road users, but it would be well under 22%.

    iliketoride - i know what you mean. I dont think its fair when "us riders" cry foul and complain about being neglected minority. In this case it was clearly a stupid mistake the rider made. But in the broader topic, motorcycles are totally left out of all government planning, be it road safety or road design or parking or whatever. In this instance the rider was clearly at fault, no question there, but i think the other guys here are thinking of teh bigger picture with some of their comments.


    Joker - well said.
     
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  20. I'd agree.

    Well it is actually closer to 10% Australia wide. So they might be making it up. Of course it could be an unusually high year in WA this year for motorcycle crashes. Maybe it's all those rich miners buying motorbikes.
     
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