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VicRoads considers allowing cyclists to run red lights

Discussion in 'The Pub' at netrider.net.au started by Jeffco, Sep 12, 2014.

  1. From Todays H/S bicyclists allowed to trest red lights and pedestrian crossings as give ways signs??? sounds like a bad idea to me. Over to you. Mods if this is in the wrong place please move

    CYCLISTS could be permitted to run red lights and drivers be banned from entering bike lanes at all in a bid to get more riders on Victorian roads.
    The measures are among reforms being considered to make the roads more bike-friendly and reduce conflict with motorists.
    VicRoads has begun to examine results from a recent online survey of the state’s cycling road rules.



    And a full report on a possible overhaul of the state’s road rules is due to be released by the end of this year.

    The Herald Sun can reveal the following options are on the Government’s radar:

    BANNING cyclists’ use of headphones;
    ALLOWING motorcyclists to share bike lanes with cyclists;
    REQUIRING motorists to be 1m away from cyclists;
    ALLOWING cyclists to treat red lights like Give Way signs;
    PERMITTING cyclists, riding cautiously, to proceed past a stationary tram;
    ALLOWING those aged 12-17 to ride on a footpath if with a child aged under 12;
    LETTING cyclists with kids under 10 in a trailer or child seat to use the footpath; and
    ALLOWING all riders to use the footpath, provided that they give way to pedestrians.

    Currently, cyclists must stop at red lights or be liable to the same fine as motorist.
    Cyclists who run red lights have become one of motorists’ biggest pet hates.

    But under one suggested reform, cyclists could be allowed to treat red lights as Give Way signs. And the same could also apply at pedestrian lights.

    The reforms could also see motorists banned from entering the bike lane under any circumstances. Currently, drivers can enter bike lanes for up to 50m in order to park or turn.

    VicRoads’ Sharon Duijkers-Mahood said any new laws would be aimed at making Victoria more bike-friendly.
    “The range of road rules which relate to or affect bike riders will be examined,” Ms Duijkers-Mahood said.

    “The aim is to determine whether the cycling-related road rules and legislation for bike riders are working as well as they should be and, if necessary, make recommendations on how they can be improved or better communicated to ensure the safety of bike riders and encourage more people to ride.”

    Laws applying to cyclists have been tightened over the past decade.

    Penalties apply if cyclists do not stop behind stationary trams, and fines for running red lights and not wearing bike helmets have increased.
    aleks.devic@news.com.au
     
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    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Shows how powerful BNV is...
     
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  3. Interesting timing as our (NSW) Government is trying to clip the wings of Sydney's bike-loving, progress-hating Lord Mayor...
     
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  4. WTF next? If anyone should be allowed to go through red lights, it's motorcycles, because we can twist on the gas and GTFO of the firing line faster than 99.999% of other road users.
     
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  5. Makes sense to me. Get the slowest accelerating vehicles out of the way and into the bike lanes so I don't have to wait on them.
     
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  6. Some of the possible changes make sense and some don't. I imagine that is how the majority will see and react to the changes.
     
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  7. HUN Today

    Pedal power: VicRoads considers allowing cyclists to run red lights

    876124-6e1affa2-3983-11e4-8c2d-d7bb5a31a70d.
    Laws applying to cyclists have been tightened over the past decade.

    CYCLISTS could be permitted to run red lights and drivers be banned from entering bike lanes at all in a bid to get more riders on Victorian roads.

    The measures are among reforms being considered to make the roads more bike-friendly and reduce conflict with motorists.

    VicRoads has begun to examine results from a recent online survey of the state’s cycling road rules.

    And a full report on a possible overhaul of the state’s road rules is due to be released by the end of this year.

    The Herald Sun can reveal the following options are on the Government’s radar:

    BANNING cyclists’ use of headphones;

    ALLOWING motorcyclists to share bike lanes with cyclists;

    REQUIRING motorists to be 1m away from cyclists;

    ALLOWING cyclists to treat red lights like Give Way signs;

    PERMITTING cyclists, riding cautiously, to proceed past a stationary tram;

    ALLOWING those aged 12-17 to ride on a footpath if with a child aged under 12;

    LETTING cyclists with kids under 10 in a trailer or child seat to use the footpath; and

    ALLOWING all riders to use the footpath, provided that they give way to pedestrians.



    875604-0fd9d73a-39ae-11e4-8c2d-d7bb5a31a70d.
    Drivers could be banned from entering bike lanes under the reforms being considered. Cyclists on Princes Bridge. Picture: Brendan Francis.



    Currently, cyclists must stop at red lights or be liable to the same fine as motorist.

    Cyclists who run red lights have become one of motorists’ biggest pet hates.

    But under one suggested reform, cyclists could be allowed to treat red lights as Give Way signs. And the same could also apply at pedestrian lights.

    The reforms could also see motorists banned from entering the bike lane under any circumstances. Currently, drivers can enter bike lanes for up to 50m in order to park or turn.

    VicRoads’ Sharon Duijkers-Mahood said any new laws would be aimed at making Victoria more bike-friendly.

    “The range of road rules which relate to or affect bike riders will be examined,” Ms Duijkers-Mahood said.

    “The aim is to determine whether the cycling-related road rules and legislation for bike riders are working as well as they should be and, if necessary, make recommendations on how they can be improved or better communicated to ensure the safety of bike riders and encourage more people to ride.”

    Laws applying to cyclists have been tightened over the past decade.

    Penalties apply if cyclists do not stop behind stationary trams, and fines for running red lights and not wearing bike helmets have increased.
     
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  8. Interesting that BNV is open to allowing riders to share bicycle lanes with bicycles... that doesn't sound right.
     
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  9. That was one of the questions in that bike survey that was linked here a while ago. I guess a few motorcycle riders filled the survey out too :whistle:
     
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  10. Perhaps they have finally realised that unlike drivers, riders have a vested interest to see and not hit cyclists, because in a collision with a cyclist we are likely to get hurt too.
     
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  11. I collided with a bicycle in Guatemala and came off second best even though i was on a motorcycle and was wearing more gear. Neither of us was seriously injured fortunately but I was knocked out.

    As a motorcyclist a bicycle is a real risk. Motorcyclists should be careful.
     
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  12. It sounds like a bargaining point proffered to get the other concessions they're after.

    Frankly, if it opens up access to those lanes for us adequately-propelled riders and helps congestion along with the considerable broader benefits that we know stem from that, then if the occasional cyclist gets coathangered off their crotch-chafing, reflectorised pride and joy by a two-tonne MP3 player after going through a red light, I'm not really going to be too worried.

    Their ultimate safety remains a matter for them, as ours does for us.
     
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    • Winner Winner x 1
  13. Only two objections from me:

    The reforms could also see motorists banned from entering the bike lane under any circumstances. Currently, drivers can enter bike lanes for up to 50m in order to park or turn.

    That would make left hand turns, and parking, illegal in most circumstances. Absurd.

    PERMITTING cyclists, riding cautiously, to proceed past a stationary tram;
    Traffic, including cyclists, can already proceed past trams when the doors are closed. Why should they need to do it while passengers are alighting or boarding? Idiotic, especially considering the tram will immediately power past them to the next stop.

    The rest I'm fine with but it will be a liability minefield unless cyclists are given complete legal immunity :rolleyes:
     
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  14. Nah, that's too logical.


    What a surprise. Your whole existance is a statistical outlier isn't mate? lol
     
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    • Winner Winner x 1
  15. Why are you such a dick? I just said it was a risk.
     
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  16. Risk or not, the reported number of such encounters is extraordinarily low.

    What I do like about this set of measures it that it appears to allow certain activities dependent on the cyclist accepting responsibility for the outcome. That's something they haven't been required to do (much) until now.
    That same principle is the one we motorcyclists would need adopted to get access to bicycle lanes.
     
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  17. How would the ban from using bike lanes work where the parking is on one side and the driving lanes is on the other?

    Really this just comes about because cyclists are getting hit in cycle lanes, but i bet that is because the car never used a indicator and they never gave way. Both of which they need to do but I often see cars not doing. Police the fricking current laws.
     
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  18. Had a discussion with Heli this morning. He pointed out that some of these are actually allowed by law at the moment

    Seems that Vic Roads aren't aware of what some of their laws already allow.
     
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  19. Presumably a rhetorical question.

    :)
     
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  20. I like the idea of being able to use a bike lane.. but its probably not going to be useful if theres 200 bikes riding in a group on the weekend.

    I see cyclists running red lights all the time presumably because they don't get caught...

    I'm not really sure if i agree with letting them legally run red lights, because it could increase stupidity on their behalf... for example; what if 5 bikes decide to run the red and the 5th is a bit slow and gets clobbered by a car or bike.

    idno
     
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