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Two year warranty questions

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by Saspotato, May 20, 2014.

  1. #1 Saspotato, May 20, 2014
    Last edited: May 20, 2014
    I bought a new bike ('13 Street Triple) and it came with a two year warranty. I have done all my own servicing with assistance from my fiance who was a mechanic (both cars and bikes) in the past. I was told that I have to take it to a licenced mechanic to maintain my warranty though they did tell me it didn't have to be their (i.e Triumph) dealership. I don't really want to do this as it costs heaps more plus I don't trust them as much. (well I have taken my bike in once to a mechanic to get rear tyre change and they fcuked it up which I realise is not a large sample size but even so, it makes me less trusting).



    My fiance is a licenced car mechanic, but I presume he'd have to be a licenced bike mechanic? Or does the mechanic need to be tied to a shop to count?

    Also how likely is it I will need warranty repairs? I thought anything dodgy would be covered by recalls or the fact that manufacturers need to make sure their parts, etc are fit for purpose, regardless of whether there is a warranty.

    Trying to decide if I should just void my warranty and do the work myself or whether it is worthwhile to take it into a mechanic. Anyone been in this situation? I have to do at least two services a year.

    edit: I should point out I get a 404 error when I try to check the T&C of warranties as listed on the Triumph Australia webpage.
     
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  2. If the manufacturers service schedules are followed correctly it shouldn't effect your warranty.

    There are a couple of other threads on this topic if you want to search them, try "voiding warranty"
     
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  3. There is a caveat to that, it assumes you are talking about manufacturers warranty and not dealer warranty which could have all sorts of conditions attached to it.
     
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  4. Ok thanks. That seems to be what I am reading - if I follow the schedule and use the right parts I should be fine and if I mess it up it's on me (which is fair enough). This is the manufacturer's warranty. I have a three month one from the dealer.

    I did some searching before posting and found some info, but was more curious if anyone has tried to claim the warranty with self servicing and had any issues or if there is any actual law on it (this seems to deal in part with the issue: http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/caca2010265/s93.html).
     
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  5. From what I remember when my wife was Warranty Clerk for a Harley/Aprilia/Buell/Polaris Dealer, providing the 'service book' is signed/stamped by an authorised/registered mechanic they don't care. If the service book isn't signed/stamped, good luck, some dealerships will care/others won't.
     
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  6. Does it have to be a bike mechanic or will a car mechanic do? :)
     
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  7. Generally speaking a licensed mechanic will suffice, he needs to include his registration/license number on the stamp/signature.

    Some shops may question it, then you'll need to speak with the manufacturer/Importer.

    Janice (my wife) said that Harley preferred to see authorised HD mechanics signing off the book, but would accept others under sufferance.
     
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  8. It's not the mechanic but the shop that is licensed !!!
    Jeremy Burgess can service your bike and void your warranty if he does it at home.
    Sorry but very true and one to watch out for.

    It's up to you and your relationship with your dealer, or in particular your service manager that will make it happen or not. If you were nice, bought the bike from the shop and had it serviced there all the time for it's first year. And if you looked like you could find your ass with only one hand I would stamp your book for you doing it on minor services... ie an oil change.... If you bought the oil and parts from me. Otherwise why would they? There's nothing in it for them, and everything these days is about the bloody $$$$

    Both dealer (a separate private company and not really your dealers) and manufactures warranty state that the bike must be serviced at the prescribed intervals in a "licensed workshop".

    And the ACCC also state this.
     
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  9. I'm happy to be proven wrong if that's the case, can you include some legislative references to verify that information please. Not the manufacturers wording because that will be overridden by statute normally.
     
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  10. I have no loyalty to a dealer or mechanic so would not expect them to stamp my book so that's fair enough.

    I had good service from the place I bought my bike as far as the sale went but I don't live anywhere near them so am just not ever going to get my bike serviced there even if I didn't do my own work.

    Triumph mentions that it needs to be stamped by a licenced dealer on its webpage but this isn't allowed under the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 so I know that manufacturers and dealers are prevented from insisting you are limited to them for servicing. I was just curious if this could be extended to people who do their own servicing. Do you have a link to the ACCC website where it discusses it?
     
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  11. If I were you I would be checking forums and seeing if people are having a lot of warranty problems with your particular model, if so then I would definitely have it serviced at a dealer whilst in warranty then have your fiancée service and stamp the book after the warranty period.

    If there are not any warranty claims then you should seriously think about your fiancée doing the services although future buyers like to see dealers stamps in the book especially during the warranty times.

    I personally have the services done by a dealer during warranty which has paid off with my car when they replaced a differential due to a whine after the warranty period that saved me $6000 because I had been getting it serviced with the dealer.
     
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  12. Another point to this discussion. When a licensed motorcycle shop services your bike, they produce a job card & then an invoice which are usually stored in a database, and cannot legally be altered once the invoice has been handed to the customer & payment received.
    When you service you own bike at home, you generally do not document it in such a way as to be un alterable. So when push comes to shove, a manufacturer can refuse warranty if something smells fishy, on the grounds that the servicing documentation you provided, are not acceptable as you could be lying about the servicing and have just written them up yesterday to cover your ass.
     
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  13. I think if I do end up servicing myself I'll keep all the receipts. At the moment I use a google doc to record all the services and you can view all historical changes to see the date I documented the services.

    Kev, yes I'll check if there are many common issues with my bike and the cost of going to a mechanic before deciding.
     
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  14. Somewhere in all this is a requirement, *I think*, that any parts fitted during routine servicing must be genuine parts for the brand, or whatever the dealer would fit as an approved alternative, with receipts kept. It would be absurd to get knocked back for an engine failure claim just for using a cheap aftermarket oil filter, for example, but the manufacturer could argue that you've changed the bike's operating spec.
     
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  15. I bought my bike new, servicing during the warranty period was done at the dealership, I like long distance riding and over the past 2 years I have had 3 kangaroo strikes totaling just under $20,000 worth of repair work overall and I am still with the same insurer, the dealership done the insurance repair work, I have had a good a relationship with them and they have done a good job, in saying that I believe that it is important that building a relationship with your dealership and service mechanic is important.

    I import most of my parts, the dealership I use has no problem with me supplying parts, it cuts the cost down and saves money.

    The warranty is now over so I do my own minor servicing, import and fit my own tires, the money I save from doing this now pays for the dealership to do the major servicing which I have no interest in doing myself.

    My feeling on this subject is,
    If you feel that you can follow the maintenance schedule and do it all yourself and you don't flog your bike to death then it is unlikely that you will have a warranty issue, its just my view but if you are concerned about warranty then stay with the dealer servicing until your warranty is up then continue yourself.

    Just my thoughts

    Cheers
     
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  16. Well they said multiple times that Saspotato's new ride had had the 1st service done already but they haven't signed n stamped the book for that.

    When I was still in the industry, I can't ever remember the service books being signed and stamped very often.
     
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  17. And what does that have to do with what I said?
     
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  18. At the end of the day, if you do the servicing yourself you risk voiding the warranty.

    Now it's up to the individual how much they value the warranty over the savings of servicing yourself.
     
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  19. I was just pointing out that they haven't signed n stamped it themselves. I'm not picking holes in your post. Even though they haven't filled it out, I would still sign it myself being a new vehicle.
     
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  20. When you book in at a licensed dealer it's done through a system called Revolusion or something like that.
    Then when the bike comes in for the service, the job sheet is printed off Revolusion and then when you pay it goes through that as well.
    It keeps all records and gives us our percentages at the end of the month, so we get our bonuses for ripping you off the most... ah running the place at it's most efficient.

    You can have your bike serviced anywhere as long as the "shop" is a licensed motorcycle mechanic/repairer.
    If he isn't on some sort of computer system, then I would be jumping up and down to have my book

    stamped.https://www.accc.gov.au/publication...industry-guide-to-the-australian-consumer-law
     
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