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Turning a bike on its forks, good or bad?

Discussion in 'Bling and Appearance' at netrider.net.au started by GreenNinja, Dec 23, 2006.

  1. Hi,



    i turn my bike on its forks all the time, is it a bad fing to do it?
     
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  2. :? You can turn spaghetti on a fork...
     
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  3. Are these Kevin Rudd-type forks, or the front forks? What do you mean by 'turning the bike on its forks'???
     
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  4. hahaha loving the kevin rudd forks.


    yeah, what exactly do you mean? are you trying to tell us that you pivot your handlebar whilst the bike is stationary? if so - it's not bad for the forks.
     
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  5. are you doing endo stoppies and turning the bike while the rear wheel is in the air?
     
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  6. Oh....... did i say forks?......... i meant FOOT STAND, dun tell me, i'm an idiot! (i know lol).

    so let me rephase the question, is it bad to turn ur bike on its stand?

    (and i wish i cud do a stoppie let alone a stoppie den turning ur bike around).
     
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  7. Shouldn't be too bad for it. Just ensure the side stand doesn't fold up when you're not expecting.

    For help with that try here.
     
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  8. not real good for the stand. The stand's meant to support the bike, not hold up it's entire weight, let alone while being twisted.
     
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  9. Meant to or not, I've seen the workers in bike shops do it all the time when they put them out in the morning, and back in the showroom at night.

    Seems a bit risky to me though, if the stand folds back up while you're spinning it around then it could be costly.
     
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  10. Not a good practice methinks. Absolutely right, a risk of a drop or similar is quite real. They're not made nor exist for twists and drags.
     
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  11. I do with a 270+ and 200kg bikes. Do it gently. Had no problems on very smooth concrete for 3 years. Probably better to put a piece of carpet, to help it slip, under the legs before putting that stand down though.

    But I don't think the manufacturers would recommend it.
     
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  12. nobody will guarantee it, but if it works and its your bike, why not...
     
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  13. I have to dissagrree there.. the stand is designed to support the ENTIRE weight of the bike not 1/3 like most people think...

    As for the twisting... yeah I don't think they were designed for that...
     
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  14. Wrong. Side stands are like superman :grin:
     
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  15. Yeah, but they expect to be selling the bikes to someone else. I wonder if they do it with their own bikes?
     
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  16. I would recomend to only do it in first......

    Depends on the side stand, if you've seen the little piece of bend alloy wire the older Ducatis use - then no.
    Most Jap bikes have pretty strudy sidestands.
    But I would still recomend aganist it, this is Australia, you are bound to find some space in this country to turn a bike around properly...
     
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  17. yeah, i put my bike on my kickstand all the time; especailly when i'm lubing up my chain.

    you can even swivle your bike 180 in tight spots.
     
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  18. Sooo i guess the answer is inconclusive, its really up to the indidvidual wat they want to do (turn or not to turn).

    Me my self, i'll still use the stands to turn my bike but only when i REALLY have to.

    and as for the stands folding on u, its ur fault! (cuz ur clumsy) and the bike stand breaking on u........ dats another story.

    i wonder if theres anyone out there who had their bike stand SNAP! on em......... (how wud dat look? lol)
     
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  19. i do it all the time. reallly handy when parking in tight spots. can't see how it's going to damage the sidestand / frame - you're not putting any huge dynamic stresses on it.

    As for stopping the sidestand from folding, just make sure that a) it's out properly, and b) you pull backwards when you spin the bike around.

    Phil
     
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