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tips for ridding on rough twisties?

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by NMD, Nov 1, 2006.

  1. hey guys,

    ive been riding for about a month now, and am loving it!!, ive just started to venture out into some good roads around my area (newcastle) and ive found that they are not such a good quality. now the bike that im riding, cagiva mito, has an extremely stiff front end. the rear is not so bad.

    my query lies with what to do on rough twisties as the topic suggests. id love a few pointers. anything to get me riding smoother and a wee bit quicker through them.

    thanks



    brendan.

    ps. should i put a slighty lighter fork oil in the front?
     
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  2. Looking at your suspension is one option, but suspension is always a compromise and however you set it up it's never going to be perfect for everything.

    Rough road surfaces are mentally and physically challenging. You have to adjust your cornering lines to take account for grip and surface roughness and aim for the smooth bits. This might mean you have to get off the ideal wide-entry road riding line.

    You're best off taking it a fair bit slower, as you'll need extra brainpower to manage the lower traction and more difficult line selection.
     
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  3. What Loz said. :wink:

    Also, remember to stay calm and relaxed and calculating. A bikes natural reaction to these things is to ride itself out of the bumps. It's when you stiffen up and try to wrestle the bars that things can become real nasty. Grip the bike with your knee and keep a loose grip on the bars. The bike will bounce around a bit, but as long as you're not going fast enough to loose traction on the bumps you should be ok. :)
     
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  4. I find it's best to keep on the power and use rear wheel steering. Keep the front light so it can easily absorb the bumps.
     
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  5. try to avoid these roads
     
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  6. Have read of bikepoint. There is a heap of good info on setting up suspensions..and other stuff. The previous owners may have fiddled with the fork oil and adjusters.
    Don't look at the bumps, but look through the corner with eyes level.
     
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  7. Also stand on the pegs a touch to help the suspension along. Did wonders on my old Across!
     
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  8. What Seany said - as long as you don't panic or focus too much on the bumps you should be fine. Although you should still always regard rough roads with a little respect (and not as a racetrack ;)).
     
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  9. Hey NMD

    Welcome to the world of Riding, i also live in Newcaslte.

    The cavigo mito is a nice bike to throw around, my adive in taking the corners is to put in a lot of counter steering coupled with good weight control into your lean.

    Theres many-a-technique in taking on the twisities, remember you have only been riding for a month, you will gain a lot more confidence and experience in the year to come.
     
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  10. hey thanks for the response guys.

    its all been good advice and i will take all of it aboard.

    OutbreakMonkey: rear wheel steering?? what the? now i reckon that im pretty quick at picking up things but this is way away, care to explain? haha

    nicholas: the mito is a fanstastic bike. if you want to meet up this afternoon Huzey (rhys) is picking up his bike and we are celebrating with a ride into town. should be in town at around 6pm. there will be a yellow cbr 250rr and a little red mito. come and say g'day


    once again thanks alot. all in the name of knowledge and smoother/safer riding

    brendan
     
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  11. Another good pointer for rough roads - Hang on tight!
     
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  12. With your knees. :wink:
     
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  13. Go a bit slower, and take the weight of the handle bars - use your muscles to support your own weight so that the front-end can react to the bumps without the addition of 'your' weight on the bars.

    And of course...pick the line that is the least bumpy. :)
    John.
     
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  14. NMD -

    Maybe Outbreak rear wheel steers (RWS) differently to what I do. Traditionally, on the track, it's the art of (and it IS an art) powering on early, getting the rear wheel spinning and sliding, thus oversteering and effectivey tightening your line as you exit your corner. Most riders balance the wheelspin by feathering the rear brake.

    Forget it for now - the Mito won't spin up, and RWS is definitely an expert technique best mastered on 600's, or even better, 1000cc inline fours.

    On the road, the chances of low or worse, high-siding the bike and hitting scenery are fairly high. Oh, and it destroys tyres. Lots of fun if you can get it right, hospital food when you don't. Best practiised on a race track.

    Meanwhile just stay on the power, stay loose, and stand by for the first time your Mito shakes its head. It won't kill you, but it sure will wake you up!
     
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  15. rightio, thats a pretty extreme way of cornering on the street.

    and im guessing that by saying shakes its head that your meaning the back to step out on me?

    ive been experimenting while coming out of u-turns in dirt/gravel/sand, clutch in, revs up, drop clutch. just to feel what its like the have the back end start stepping out.

    thanks for the pointers.


    so preeeeeety much theres not alot i can except for hang on tightly with my knees and loosen up my grip on the hangers and look for the smoothest line


    thanks once again

    brendan
     
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  16. rightio, thats a pretty extreme way of cornering on the street.

    and im guessing that by saying shakes its head that your meaning the back to step out on me?

    ive been experimenting while coming out of u-turns in dirt/gravel/sand, clutch in, revs up, drop clutch. just to feel what its like the have the back end start stepping out.

    thanks for the pointers.


    so preeeeeety much theres not alot i can except for hang on tightly with my knees and loosen up my grip on the handle bars, slightly, and look for the smoothest line


    thanks once again

    brendan
     
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  17. This is all good. There is an alternative style you could try, which is to take as much weight as possible on the footpegs, with just a little through the bars ie. up out of the seat. The objective with this style is to let the bike itself move up and down without your weight working against it. You take the movement through your knees (althought the outside one would normally still be up against the side of the tank. It may or may not work as well, depending on the weight of the bike, your weight etc. but you might like to give it a trial.
     
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  18. No the back stepping out is just "the back stepping out".
    What "shakes the head" means is that the bars will turn from left to right to left etc etc without any input from you (well sort of, it wouldn't happen if you weren't riding). In it's extreme form it is known as a tank-slapper, which is where the bars turn so violently from side to side it causes your wrists to slap into the tank.
    This generally happens when you are powering out of a corner for example, with the front end light because the acceleration has shifted the weight to the rear tire, all you need is a little bump to the side of the front tire to start one off. What happens is one side of the tire will grip while the other side does not. This starts the two sides of the tire to start fighting for the grip. The left will grip then the right then the left again then right etc. When one side(left, for example) grips that is when the bars are pulled in that direction, but after they are facing that new direction it exposes the other side(Right, in the same example) to a whole heap of grip so it pulls back, and then the cycle continues.

    I hope this description is accurate enough and is able to help you recognize a headshake (from the bike). I sometimes have trouble articulating my thoughts and they just come out as a jumble.

    Anyway if you want to practice riding on some rough roads you should spend some time riding out here. All the roads are rubbish. And they're all pretty straight and narrow too :mad: .
     
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  19. Grady: thanks for that. i know what you mean now. let me guess thats one of the things steering dampers are supposed to dull down?

    and sorry for the double posts. this server has been sucky. i swear it isnt my fault....haha

    going riding soon so ill keep you informed on how the rough roads go

    thanks
    brendan
     
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  20. Get a GPX250? :LOL:
    Soft suspension made that easy on rough roads.

    As many have said, it's a suspension issue - but you won't be able to sort it out for rough roads without some compromise. The Mito is somewhat of a track bike, and it's not really designed for rough aussie roads. It's much the same with many of the Jap sportsbikes, unfortunately.

    Short of that, loosen up, take it slower, and don't fight the bike. :)
     
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