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Thoughts?

Discussion in 'The Pub' at netrider.net.au started by Jay77, May 7, 2013.

  1. ImageUploadedByTapatalk1367913782.513248.
    Next it will be Sony trying to make motorbikes


     
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  2. Nothing new.
    Hyosung is a conglomerate that has been around for ages (1957) and has a dig in just about everything. Possibly better known in Korea for Teller Machines than for Bikes.
    S & T Motors is the division of Hyosung that produces bikes and is relatively new.
     
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  3. I have been educated
    First Hyosung ATM I've seen though
     
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  4. Yeah. I haven't seen any here but I don't look at the branding.
    I was stunned first time I saw Mitsubishi on industrial equipment; Way used to it now.
    Might even end up with a Hyosung TV but there will never be a Ford or Holden or BMW one. The invasion is coming ...
     
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  5. i see plenty of hyosung shipping pallets... needles to say, they dont last long
     
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    • Winner Winner x 1
  6. Nokia started off making gumboots
     
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  7. Ever played a yamaha piano?
    Kawasaki make trains, planes, choppers and bikes.
    Honda make cars and lawnmowers as wellSuzuki also make cars.
    I'm sure there are others

    Hyosung are huge
     
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  8. Suzuki is a good one because they started out making Weaving Looms.
    There are also Suzuki musical instruments (I have a Suzuki guitar) but I think it's a different company.
     
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  9. #9 TonyE, May 7, 2013
    Last edited: May 7, 2013
    Mitsubishi Chemical were one of the partners of the Coal to Oil project I worked at. They have an amazing breadth of industry involvement.

    Mitsubishi Divisions
    • Produce Dept.
    • Grain & Oilseeds Dept.
    • Marine Products Dept.
    • Sweetener & Starch Products Dept.
    • Oils & Fats Dept.
    • Feed & Meat Business Dept.
    • Beverage Materials Dept.
    • Dairy Foods Dept.


    Healthcare Business Dept.




    Textiles Division

    • Fashion Apparel Dept.
    • S.P.A. Development Dept.
    • Sports & Consumer Goods Dept.


    General Merchandise Division

    • Tire & Consumer Goods Dept.
    • Paper & Packaging Dept.
    • Housing & Construction Materials Dept.

    Mineral Resources Investment Division B

    • Base Metals Dept.
    • Aluminium Dept.
    • Stainless Steel Raw Materials Dept.
    Along with Aviation (The WWII Zero was a Mitsubishi aircraft), cars, trains etc.
    etc.

    The big Japanese Zaibatsu have fingers in everything - just like the Koreans
     
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  10. You do realise that. having taken a photo of an ATM. you are now being watched.
     
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  11. Kawasaki make tractors too. Oh, you already wrote that . . . .
     
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  12. Kawasaki are also involved with worldwide transportation and have a share in PrixCar which is jointly owned by Toll
     
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  13. Kawasaki build rock crushers. Again, they were making general stuff long before they made bikes.

    Hyundai build, IIRC, something like 30% of the world's large marine piston engines, and quite a lot of the ships that go round them. And, under licence, Kawasaki crushers too.

    Mitsubishi were a general engineering and manufacturing concern long before they started making vehicles.

    Yamaha musical instruments I'm pretty sure predate their motorcycles, hence the crossed tuning fork logo.

    Hitachi, as well as making electronic goods make earthmoving machinery and used to make a nice little SU knock off carb.

    Nowhere near a comprehensive list, of course.

    Thing is, though, that, these days, road vehicle manufacture is often a minor sideline for a large industrial conglomorate rather than a main business. That's particularly the case with the more glamorous bikes which are almost all heavily cross subsidsed by the manufacturer's main operations.
     
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