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The slow turn

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by Corkie, Feb 11, 2015.

  1. Haha clutch lever anyone...slow turns need so much more practice. I also seem to run out of leg length on cambers


     
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  2. Keep you feet on the pegs and you don't need to worry about camber.
     
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  3. Oh the camber I am referring to is when parking. Parking is an exercise in strategy cos if there is a slight hill the right approach is required. I have a new found respect for bike riders who turn around in side streets...found myself utilising a driveway the other day ...but I did successfully turn around in a narrow side street!
     
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  4. Have a look at the Ride Like a Pro DVD. ;)
     
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  5. There's plenty of Ride Like a Pro videos on YouTube, plus videos of Japanese riders in gymkana competitions. Both are absolutely amazing.
     
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  6. Hey, thanks. Now I need to fit in some practice time & find a big empty carpark.
     
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  7. May be a stupid question, but are you using rear brake and enough throttle and clutch slip? Can really help when learning to use higher revs than you think you'll need, then drop them back as you get the feel for it.
     
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  8. I think beginners often inadvertently make it harder for themselves by going slower. REAL slow seems to exaggerate the effects of accelerate/decellerate, so it becomes a bit of an exercise in manipulation of controls to maintain the balance. Hey, you have to start somewhere.

    The understanding of feathering the clutch and dragging the brake appropriately can be a revelation after having the pushbike mentality where it is all in the steering, which most of us have had, until we started using motorbikes.

    It all gets easier and smoother as one gains confidence and speeds up just a little. Remember learning to ride a pushbike? "Turn the way you tip." SO much to think about. Then at some point, you just stop thinking about it. Same applies with slow turns on motorbikes.

    Parking lot practice, lots of little, short trips, parking in spaces, and getting into "wrong places" where you need to turn around and go back. Its the number of hours doing this, not kilometres travelled out on some big road that improve one's confidence in handling their bike the most.

    Roadcraft? Well that's a different thing entirely.
     
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  9. As a newbie I was terrified of slow turns and roundabouts on my first trip out in traffic earlier this week, but I found it easier than I thought. Ok, I fudged it once, but on the whole I was surprised that I (hopefully) didn't look like a wobbler. Even got my first biker nod!

    But my high speed riding out of town, to and from home is terrible. Can't wait for a group ride when an appropriate one presents itself.
     
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  10. #10 BitSar, Feb 19, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2015
    Other than what has been said regarding rear brake + clutch + throttle, another key element is head and vision.

    Force yourself to keep you eyes up, up, UP!
    Do not be tempted to look down - close to the front wheel.

    Look up and exaggerate your head turn - look way through the curve you want to trace.

    Looking further through the arc of the curve makes the angle feel slight and gradual.

    Then practice, practice, practice.
     
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  11. What's the problem with your higher speed riding GoldenberriGoldenberri ? Is it bends or what?
     
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  12. chillibuttonchillibutton I just feel...unstable is the only word that comes to mind. It could be just the light bike with not much weight on it and the constant wind in the area. I'm ok buffering, but I tend to chicken out of riding in the right hand wheel tracks and go to the centre or left.

    It's a pretty straight country road and the locals are not very forgiving if you are moving under 100kpm (top speed so far, 90kpm). Added to that, I have to turn right into our road off a 100kpm zone, (which I've done successfully each time by giving clear signals and moving to the right so I'm more visible), but I guess it's just scary because it's new that's all.

    I will persevere and practice more, but if I get it wrong on that road, there is no coming back from it.
     
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  13. My slow speed riding sucks. I usually go for a ride every day (can't at the moment due to heat & roadworks in my street) and I force myself to do a u-turn on the road to come back home. I've found that the bigger the area (think BIG carpark) I can do a tight turn fairly easily, but on the narrow road, that I u turn on, I wobble all over the shop.

    So my point is that I think it's probably better to practice in a smaller/restriced area than a larger one :)
     
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  14. #14 chillibutton, Feb 19, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2015
    Mark off a narrower area with chalk in your normal practice spot and then go for it...but pretend it's a street so no going over the lines...
     
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  15. My wife had that as well, probably is a combo or newness to bikes and nerves. Secret to winds is just to relax and keep looking where you want to go, and you'll automatically do so and adjust for winds as you go. Keep the arms relaxed. You'll find it gets better real quick.

    Right hand turns can be worrisome, just keep an eye on the car behind you to ensure they are slowing as you do.
     
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  16. Thanks chillibuttonchillibutton and rest assured I'm building up to it and checking my body all the time. However, son number 1 has a CB300 (1 week now) and is already riding very competently, swears that the 'unstable' feeling comes from the skinny rear tyre on my CB125. He says he feels much more stable on his and has offered to let me test ride it. I would except I can't reach the blasted ground and I would hate to drop his shiny new bike. :depressed:
     
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  17. Thanks chillibuttonchillibutton and rest assured I'm building up to it and checking my body all the time. However, son number 1 has a CB300 (1 week now) and is already riding very competently, swears that the 'unstable' feeling comes from the skinny rear tyre on my CB125. He says he feels much more stable on his and has offered to let me test ride it. I would except I can't reach the blasted ground and I would hate to drop his shiny new bike. :depressed:
     
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  18. Echo...... why does it do that?
     
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  19. That actually doesn't work, for me, because they're "just lines" lol. Actually being restricted, as in having no choice, works better, but that's me :)
     
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  20. I felt really unstable at 100k's with wind, but I've done it a lot now and I've found that each time I do it I feel less unstable. Cross winds, used to scare the pants off me (about 3 weeks ago ;) ) but now I'm fine with them. I think you'll find the more you ride the better you'll feel.
     
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