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The Original Fireblade

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by i_cruise, Sep 1, 2011.

  1. The bike that changed the rules... The bike that created the modern superbike category.. and all other grandiose statements apply. The trouble is, i've never ridden one! Despite being a child of the 90's and being too young to rememeber much about them, i'm a huge fan of 90's sportbikes. They're big, Loud, carburetted, meaty , look awesome and can be had for bargain money.

    My problem is I already have one that does everything i ask of it. It's is more motorcycle than I'll ever need and I absolutely love the thing, but lately I find myself scanning the classifieds for early 90's Fireblade 900's. None of the press had anything bad to say about them but who amongst us has owned one and lived with it for a while?

    I know the only way to be sure is to test ride one, but i'd still like to hear people's experiences good or bad.


     
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  2. I haven't owned one, and I've only ridden a couple, but all except the very first one are a very good thing. The only thing wrong with that was the 16" front wheel. Many were converted to 17 by their owners anyway. 929s and 954s particularly, are spoken of very fondly by those who had them.
     
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  3. i know you are after a blade, but if you are after the game changer and possibly a big collectors bike in 10 - 15 years time try and buy a pristine condition example of the first ever yamaha r1.

    i love the early blades, and they were pretty cool. ridden a few and arent too bad. 16 inch front wheel yet again is an issue these days with getting super grippy tyres though.
     
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  4. PPfftt. The original RR (race rep) bike was the mighty gixxer750..

    Awesome bike, was known as a "Hoons bike!"- at least to me it was!
     
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  5. As a general rule, if you're looking for collectability, buy the best example you can find of the earliest version. If you're looking for useability, buy the best example you can find a couple of years into production after the manufacturer got the niggles sorted out. The former will be closer to the designer's original concept, the latter will be easier to live with.
     
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  6. +1 on the 16" front wheel issue, my bike has a 16" front wheel and it means i cant match my tires front and rear (not a huge deal on a 250, but on a 900 it probably will be)

    Try and find one that has had the swap done, or swap it yourself (i dont think its too complicated)
     
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  7. I had a 954, freaking awesome bike... was very comfortable, did very easy monos, smooth progressive handling, great power and sound and of course honda reliability...
     
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  8. The original hoons bike was the Brought Superior SS100 which in 1924 was guaranteed to do 100mph.

    It also was the bike that Lawrence of Arabia was killed on.

    [​IMG]

    Of course it cost more than years wage for an average man.
     
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  9. I currently have a 1998 RRW - the last of the carbed Blades.

    It's been a great bike. More than fast enough on the road, great handling, pretty economical, easy and cheap to service, very relaible. I bought mine with under 9000 miles on the clock, it's just coming up to 50000 miles now (80000 kms).

    I've had the 2 usual problems - the reg/reg failed at about 35000 (replaced with an upgraded, genuine Honda part for £60) and I have just replaced the CCT (£65). Apart from that, just the consumables.

    I have fitted lower pegs, higher bars and a gel seat and can ride all day without too much discomfort.

    I won't be getting a sports bike in Oz purely as I fit better on something bigger - but if I do decide to get one, I would definitely consider another FireBlade. Excellent sports bikes.
     
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  10. Where did you get your lower pegs?
     
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  11. I had a couple of early blades 93 or 94 ish very forgiving bike the ones you were talking about were a bit earlier but have ridden a few of the earlier models agree about the front wheels some very good memories on blades
     

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  13. Ta muchly - you didn't have the link in your thread of fireblades.org : ).
     
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  14. I owned a 96 blade for over a year (did 20,000km on it) very solid bike. I sold it to a mate and it's coming up to 100,000km and still going strong. I still ride it from time to time. It's got just as much or more balls in a straight line as our modern 600s, but much more comfitable and great for 2up riding, they do awesome wheelies too! Doesn't handle in the same league as my 600 but you can really motor along well on them when you get the hang of riding it.

    Here's a pic of it;
    https://picasaweb.google.com/m/zoom...93878322&viewportWidth=320&viewportHeight=416
     
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  15. A highly debatable claim...
     
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  16. Agreed. If any one bike can be credited with that, it's probably the GPZ900R, although the FZ750 also has some claim. Or, if it needs to have an ally spar frame, the original FZR1000. All years before the Fireblade.
     
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  17. could you imagine 100mph on that old beast! would be... ummm... exciting?
     
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  18. Ha ha, probably not!
     
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  19. I'd have thought the bikes that the manufacturers built for the then fledgling world superbike championship would've been the ones to define the modern era of superbikes or sports bikes.

    We had Superbike racing in the 80s but they were mostly team modified naked bikes such as Robbie Phillis's Mick Hone Suzuki GSX1100s, later on Katanas and Honda CB1100Rs. Those bikes were still big, largely road riding focused on design. Whereas, when a mate bought his Kawasaki ZXR750 back in the late 80s, it had the definitive riders' crouch style of seating, out of the box.
     
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  20. My daily ride is a ZXR750 and that's my only complaint with it! You really do lay across the thing.
     
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