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Tensioner noise and dropping out of gear??

Discussion in 'Bling and Appearance' at netrider.net.au started by Dakotabre, Jul 10, 2009.

  1. Hi All,

    This might seem like a pretty broad question to ask.. I'm looking at getting my first bike, and theres one I'm looking at but the guy said theres a noticable noise thats probably coming from the Tensioner and that the bike drops out of gear sometimes when going from 3rd to 4th.

    As I said I know this is probably a broad question with heaps of possibilities, but I just thought I'd through this out there to see if anyone knew of these problems and how much they would cost roughly to fix, or even if these things 'a tensioner' is expensive to replace - Yes you may have guessed, I know nothing about bikes :(



    It's a 1999 Model Kawazaki ZZR250 for between $2,500 and $3,000.

    Thanks in advance
     
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  2. The cam chain noise is probably just the tensioned. That can be fixed for a couple of hundred dollars.

    The other problem is more ominous. I could be a combination of chain tension and/or external linkages, but it could be worse.

    My advise is stay away unless it is very cheap and you know someone who is confident to work on bikes for beers.
     
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  3. You can buy the same type of bike without known dramas for the same money. Keep looking I suggest.

    EDIT: Its $800 to much for a mystery bag of issues.
     
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  4. Definately too dear, but not a deal killer.

    I would only pay 2K max, it may cost up to 1K to get repaired.

    When we had the can chain & tensioner done with a major service (probably a good idea anyway), it cost around the $600 mark, it'll probably be a couple of hundred more to tear the gear box down. From memory, the gear selector has no linkages, so I'd bet it's in the gearbox itself.
     
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