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Suzukis are Risky Business...

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by dan, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. from http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2005/06/20/56300.htm

    :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :LOL:

    this should stir up a few debates...!

    ------------------------------------------

    Study Shows Suzuki Motorcycle Is Risky Business
    June 20, 2005



    The Suzuki GSX-R Series motorcycle is the most likely motorcycle to be stolen and to be involved in a crash according to a recent study of claims data on more than two million motorcycles insured over the past three years.

    The study, conducted by The Progressive Group of Insurance Companies, the country's largest motorcycle insurer, also revealed that the least likely motorcycle to be stolen is Suzuki Savage, while the least likely to be crashed is the Yamaha Virago Series.

    So what does this mean for bikers?

    If you choose a motorcycle that's involved in more crashes or is stolen more often you'll most likely pay more for insurance.

    "Insurance rates are based on a lot of information about you and your driving record as well as the make and model bike you ride," said Rick Stern, motorcycle product manager, Progressive. "If you buy a bike that's stolen often, you may pay more for comprehensive coverage, and if you buy a bike that is involved in more crashes then you may pay more for collision. We want bikers to be aware of what drives rates so they can make better, more informed insurance decisions."

    Most Likely to Be Stolen
    1. Suzuki GSX-R Series
    2. Yamaha YZF Series
    3. Honda CBR Series
    4. Suzuki Hayabusa
    5. Kawasaki Ninja Series

    Least Likely to be Stolen
    1. Suzuki Savage
    2. BMW R1200C
    3. Honda Rebel Series
    4. Honda Shadow Series
    5. Yamaha V-Star


    Most Likely to be Crashed:
    1. Suzuki GSX-R Series
    2. Kawasaki Ninja Series
    3. Suzuki TLR
    4. Yamaha YZF Series
    5. Honda CBR Series

    Least Likely to be Crashed
    1. Yamaha Virago Series
    2. Honda Rebel Series
    3. Suzuki Savage
    4. Harley-Davidson FXR
    5. BMW R1200C
     
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  2. OK, I'll open precedings....

    Have they taken into account eh crash/number on road percentages??

    It seem there stas on likely most likely is directly proportional to the numbers out there....

    Of course Suzuki GSX-R Series are going to be in more crashes...theres heaps of them out there

    how many honda Rebel's are on the road???? surely this impacts how likely thay are going to be in a crash.


    kinda silly stats to my way of thinking (which is wierd anyway)
     
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  3. the gixxer has taken the crown from the R1!!!! :LOL:

    good healthy competition, thats what i like to see :D
     
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  4. What odd statistics. Who would have thought the faster, better looking bikes are more likely to be stolen and more likely to be crashed? :p
     
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  5. I think you'll also find that Zooks and Kwakas rate high in crash stats because there's still enough bike left over to be recognised afterwards.
     
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  6. Can't speak for bikes but for cars the premiums are worked out by make, model, year, modifications, colour, accessories.

    The more modifications you make the more it will cost to insure. The more stock, standard it is the less it wil cost to insure.
    Silver cars have the fewest accidents, red cars the most.
    (of course, red cars go fastest!)
    Once a car becomes affordable to P platers, the premiums can go back up again because the P platers like to crash them, and the insurance companies pay out more claims.

    The suburb you live in will also affect premiums. Loadings are applied for living in high theft areas, and discounts apply if you live in low theft areas.

    I imagine the same reasoning would apply to bikes?
     
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