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Steep rise in injuries for male bikers and cyclists

Discussion in 'Research, Studies, and Data' at netrider.net.au started by Tone2, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. Sydney Morning Herald article today, based on research released by the Aust Institute of Health and Welfare. Some excerpts:

    Gotta keep away from two wheels, it's dangerous you know!

     
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  2. Actually, I wouldn't argue with a figure like '10 times more dangerous' - probably pretty close to the mark. There's a case for keeping the incompetent and fearful off bikes. But there's also one for keeping them out of cars.
     
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  3. Hold on, just let me sell my bike...
     
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  4. Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    http://smh.drive.com.au/roads-and-t...-male-bikers-and-cyclists-20120617-20id7.html :

    The study: http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737421993
     
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  5. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    no shit, prof Harrison. just fancy that - two wheeled road users are more vulnerable than four wheeled ones! At least he's not rolling out the old 38x number.
     
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  6. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    That percentage will drop once someone posts up figures for the increase in people actually travelling by motorbike these days.
     
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  7. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    Those numbers don't gel with my understanding of things. I'm going to have to spend some time on this paper.

    The one that worries me the most is that that injury rate per 100000 population has gone from 5.5 to 9. And that the injury rate per 10000 rego's has remained steady.

    Something smells fishy.
     
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  8. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    That's why I posted it here, i knew someone other than me would have time to actually read it ;p
     
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  9. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    Is it because the population rate is based upon the general population? That is, including riders and non-riders. If so, as riders constitute an increasing proportion of the population at large (as they are doing) I would expect the injury rate to go up because, however we might like to portray it, motorcycling does carry a greater risk of death or serious injury than driving a car.

    OTOH, the PKT rate is, presumably, for riders only. If this is steady or, ideally, trending downwards, it indicates that the risk associated with riding, for individual riders, remains steady or improving. This gels with what other sources of raw stats have been showing for years.

    So I don't see this as fishy at first glance. Haven't read the report though.
     
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  10. if we were worried about risks we take every day, we may as well stay in padded room at home with no windows, and lead lining.
     
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  11. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    In Victoria the serious injury count has remained steady while the registered number of bikes has doubled in the last 10 or so years. That's a real terms reduction.

    There's been an increase in minor injuries in part due to the doubling of the rider population and in part due to better reporting.

    Pat you might be right about the population statistic, so if the participation doubles while the injury rate per biker remains the same, then we can expect the injury rate per population to increase. All that pollies and newspapers are going to see is an increase - these stats are being shaped to produce a very negative impression.
     
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  12. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    Rego per participant may be increasing as well which explains why injuries per rego is steady.
     
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  13. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    "Statistics released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare..."

    "James Harrison is an Associate Professor in the School of Medicine at Flinders University, where he directs the Research Centre for Injury Studies. The Research Centre operates the National Injury Surveillance Unit of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, and Dr. Harrison also directs this program. "

    Not your usual Road Safety Industry type, not sure if he stands to benefit in the same ways. Could be he also has been drawn to the low hanging fruit, however the summary mentions increased rates for both motorcyclists and cyclists rising, several times. It appears to be the SMH reporter that has cherry-picked the PTW statements for her story. Headline hunting?
     
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  14. I love passing old blokes on $10k BMC racers up hill on my mountain bike LOL
     
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  16. Re: Trends in serious injury due to land transport accidents, Australia, 2000-2001 to 2008-2009

    From what I can see, it talks about riders injured as a percentage of all those injured.

    Well, duh!

    Given the increase in safety features for cars (ABS, ESC, airbags etc) car casualties have fallen. Motorcycle casualties have also fallen significantly but the number of motorcycles on the road has increased. By a much greater rate than the number of motorcycle casualties.

    For example: in 2000 lets say there were 100 casualties - 80 car and 20 motorcycle.

    In 2010 there are 80 casualties, 60 car and 20 motorcycles. Motorcycle casualties (in real numbers) have stayed the same - cars have gone down so motorcycles as a percentage of all casualties have risen from 20% to 25%.

    However, lets say there are now double the numbers of motorcycles on the road - so in reality, motorcycle casualties have fallen by 50% in real terms.

    A fifty percent decrease is excellent news - but we can be certain that those with an vested interest in presenting bad news won't broadcast it. It's much harder to get research grants for motorcycle safety, money for enforcement etc if the news is actually good.

    As for older riders, their crash rate hasn't increased either - it's just that there's more of them. There's the Qld paper showing that somewhere on here - I CBF looking for it.
     
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  17. gee, maybe cars should look where they are going
     
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  18. Just line your helmet with tin foil and keep an F88 in the back paddock -- motorbikes tend to only kill one person at a time, governments are much more efficient.
     
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  19. Merged two threads.
     
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  20. I will do my best too stay upright and not break anything more this year :)
     
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