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roll on wheelies are cool =D

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by slyfox, Jul 25, 2006.

  1. i popped my first this evening on my way home from work :grin: putting along at 50ish in first i gave it a handfull and hooned into the distance as you do, it was only when i throttled off and the wheel dropped a foot (guestimate) back onto the road that i'd realised it was airbourne. :p (it all happens rather quickly on the zed in 1st gear.) i'd popped up the front wheel on the zzr250 but only off the lights dumping the clutch.



    so yes, fun times! the only question is why doesn't it come up when i take off at the lights and race to 80. :-k (not really 'racing,' fist full of throttle but i'm not slipping the clutch out yet, just taking my time.) perhaps the quick power on at 50 helped it lift but i've throttled on from that speed in first lots of times. :-k

    ahh well, it was amusing no matter what the physics were, i don't care for stunting but a roll on wheelie gets a 10/10 rating for shits and giggles from me.

    :biker:
    naturally this occured on my own private race track that i ride on to get home from work, acres from public roads.
     
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  2. i did my first little monos tonight too!!! haha.

    good work. but be safe, i have 8 motorcycle stunt DVD's at home were most of them have been doing it a long time,. and they still come unstuck and its not pretty when they do!
     
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  3. For every net video you see of a successful wheelie, there are 12 others where the rider screws it up and it's expensive :p

    My friend has a video [or link to it] where this really good stunt-rider gives step-by-step instructions for learning to wheelie, ride on one wheel, etc.

    He gives full advice for building confidence, practice drills to give you more balance and feel for the bike on 1 wheel, etc. Complete with demonstrations by him: both observing the bike AND helmet cam.

    I'll get the link off him and post it...
     
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  4. Wheelies are one of lifes true pleasures!
    Learn to control your throttle well and you won't have any problems.
    And if you are really worried about coming unstuck simply teach yourself to cover your rear brake during the wheelie.
     
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  5. This one?
     
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  6. teach me, its a good party trick to know
     
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  7. it wouldn't be lifting off the light because the bike doesn't have enough power by half to lift it :)
     
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  8. clutch up > roll on!

    But welcome to the dodgy world of crap wheelies!
     
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  9. If you or your bike are anything like me (and my bike), it's because you unconciously sort of roll off a little on the throttle when the power kicks in, due to a fear of landing on your arse. Whereas if you are putting along and snap the throttle on, you're in, or near the meat of the torque curve already. I reckon if you just open it up and hold it there it will start to lift from a standstill, and you'll land on your arse nice and quick :) Could be other stuff that helps when it seems to work one day and not the next, like it's a colder day, you're sitting further back on the seat, you accidentally compressed the suspension a little (bounced) just before you cracked it open (ie. a little bit of a roll off) etc. etc.
     
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  10. My explanation is this.

    When you roll off from the lights, if you keep it pinned, the bike doesn't have enough power to lift the nose from stand-still, so instead what happens is the weight transfers to the back wheel, and stays there.

    If instead you're travelling at 50, and then snap the throttle in first, what happens is 'cos the bike was steady at 50kph and then you rapidly accelerated, the bike's suspension was steady and then starts transferring weight to the rear wheel, so in a sense the bike's weight starts to rotate and in doing so now has some momentum which gives the engine just enough assistance to lift the front wheel. Once the front wheel is lifted the power required to lift it further is less, and so away you go.

    This can also be achieved by doing a steady throttle at 50kph, chopping the throttle, and then powering on. The front forks then rebound and assist in lifting the front wheel.
     
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  11. Cheers on the link Van.
     
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  12. Ignore the crap I was spewing, this is much better. ;)
     
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  13. In addition to what Cathar says it's also RPM based. Each engine reaches peak torque at different RPMs. Typically for I4s that's higher in the range so the power just isn't there until you get moving. Vtwins can reach high torque levels quite rapidly so tend to get the front wheel off the ground earlier than a similarly powered inline.
    If you were to race start from the lights and hold a little more throttle than you should, it would certainly lift.
     
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  14. all the above makes sense, i'll keep at it and try to avoid popping them up without preplanning. i just wish it was more obvious when it lifts off (a cool sound effect like a sonic boom would be nice. :p) perhaps i'll notice it in the future when i get more used to the bike and the lift sensation.

    re. rpm's the nice thing about the zed is the torque kicks in hard at 5,000rpm so it doesn't take much work to get moving.

    and in other news i fitted my new tinted visor today, bloody awesome for glare etc, why didn't i get one sooner. :roll:
     
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  15. Awesome vid there, thanks for the post!
     
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  16. wheelies are are lot easier to balance when you are moving/rolling at a reasonable speed already, although the risk of damage rises in proportion to your speed. its the same as when on two wheels - bikes like to stay upright and have good balance once they are moving.

    when you roll on using the torque of the bike its easier to control the upwards movement initially, but you will be accelerating pretty rapidly too and if you keep going will flip yourself over.

    clutching up makes it easier to control your speed, but is pretty unnverving at first when the bike pops from flat to 45 degrees in an instant. that is where balancing your throttle on keeping your foot on the rear brake come into play.
     
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  17. Guess what I'm trying next time I'm out riding? :grin:

    Great vid, thanks! Anyone have more?

    Breno can you copy your DVD's for me?
     
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  18. hey man ill find them as my room is a mess and drop em round one morning. Bmarsh is just down the road..
     
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  19. Cool thanks dude, I'II PM you my number :wink:
     
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  20. Yeah, that's the one.

    I tried slipping the clutch the other day on my 250 as I don't think it's got the power for a roll-on.
    I didn't have enough revs though [me = scared] was just a big jerk for me and the bike.

    Maybe I'll work up to it...
     
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