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Road Craft - observation, anticipation, braking

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by b12mick, Oct 19, 2016.

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  1. This was posted on a FB page I'm on. I think some others on this forum are on the same page.



    What are your thoughts.

     
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  2. If it had that reaction, he was going too fast for the area . What if there was a real wombat on the apex ?
     
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  3. What would a real, wombat running out have made him do? If you can't manage your ride because you've noticed an immobile object that makes you panic, you've got no business being there.
     
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  4. The cut-out is on a straight in the pic, not mid corner near the apex. I reckon he was pissed off about it and exaggerated his story to make a point.
     
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  5. Why did he lose rear wheel traction? His braking technique needs some work. Assuming he isn't riding a cruiser, the rear is pretty useless under heavy braking, and generally better to leave it alone. If the bike can do stoppies, then don't touch the rear at all.
     
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  6. He rides a Hyosung GT thing.

    My comment on the FB page was "I'd say old mate needs to practice braking".
     
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  7. Some or all of the following I recon:

    Too fast for road.
    Not paying enough attention.
    Poor braking technique.
    Bit of a c**k.
     
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  8. Yes t oall of above. Seriously - you fell off due to a cutout picture. WTF!
     
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  9. At what 'angle' was he on at that point? He would still have been bolt upright as he went past it.

    Sad thing is, he doesn't appear to have learnt from the experience.
     
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  10. "nearly unrecoverable" - so he didn't crash. Sounds exactly like a panic rear brake stomp that he let go before the bike got too far out of shape and turned into a high side.

    On approach to a corner, I doubt many of us are genuinely scanning the side of the road - so once that wombat image landed in his consciousness, he would have been fairly close and a panic brake is no surprise - but still a panic brake under the maws of a regularly practicing ebraking rider is quite different to a panic brake of an unpracticed rider. How fast was he going?

    Actually, a cutout of a wombat right there isn't that terrible an idea if you're trying to stop riders spearing off the corner. It'd make me slowdown!
     
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  11. I'll bring one to poker night to arrest any runs you might have....
     
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  12. not sure how cardboard can 'force' anyone to do anything ... or have I missed a useful method for getting housework done?
     
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  13. And that is one of the reasons why people who don't frequent country back roads very often come to grief on them. If you aren't continually scanning the side of the ride and the bush/paddocks beyond then you will have no hope of seeing that kangaroo, echidna, emu, eagle, koala, brumby, goat, pig, cow, sheep, dog etc etc that is about to jump out in front of you.....
     
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  14. Agree. Although you forgot deer. They are fkn everywhere these days.
    And all these species behave differently. It helps to have an idea what they are like in that respect.
     
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  15. I have to admit, in all the years I've been riding on back country roads I have NEVER seen deer roaming free.
     
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  16. Maybe a cutout poster of a policeman with a radar gun would have caused the same problem for the rider.
     
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  17. I suppose it's a perception thing too. A rider not used to riding in country has the perception that because there's no traffic they can relax and don't have to concentrate so much on what's happening around them. Then come on Internet forums and FB Pages and say things like "I was just riding along when all of a sudden I saw a wombat in the middle of the corner and that's why I crashed" and then get upset when someone like me comes along and asks "What have you learned from this? What do you think you could have done differently? What will you do in the future to minimise the chance of it happening again?".
     
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  18. #18 robsalvv, Oct 20, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2016
    Yep I grew up in the semi rural sticks, so appreciate the wide view/scanning view that should be used, but I have to admit that my focus on approach to a corner is about the very much more likely and present danger of managing the corner and corner entry.
     
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  19. While this isn't aimed at you because I know you do, but for the 'young players' out there, surely part of managing the corner is anticipating the presence of other vehicles, wildlife/livestock, and debris? Observation has a big part to play in that anticipation.

    It also depends on the area you are in, which I understand comes down to local knowledge as well. For example, the stretch of the Snowy Mountains Hwy that follows Blowering Dam, the chances of having an errand kangaroo or emu on the road is as great (or greater around the rangers station) as having a vehicle cross to the wrong side of the road.
     
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  20. Good point.

    In terms of managing the corner, a lot of it is about the visual cues, from which I mean identifying the vanishing point, scanning the entry point condition, looking for debris, looking for obstacles, looking for the exit etc. I can't see further through the corner than the vanishing point related to the line I've chosen, so that is the earliest warning of issues/obstacles actually on the road. By that time, if there's an errant penguin about to run across the apex of the corner, I'm toast. Given that corners tend to be as a result of topographical features, errant wildlife in corners seems to be a low likelihood risk, but not zero.
     
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