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Rim bent - fix? Ignore?

Discussion in 'Technical and Troubleshooting Torque' at netrider.net.au started by mattb, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. G'day All.

    Ultimately I guess I'll have to get this inspected by a knowing person in the flesh, but I'm interested in the opinion of anybody familiar with working on spoked wheels.



    I bought this rear XT500 wheen off eBay for a wire wheel conversion for the SR500. The seller (a wreckers, who originally sent me the wrong wheel, and hasn't responded to my message clearly implying that my having to cop the return postage is a bit of an issue) stated in the ad: "This a XT500C standard rear wheel in reasonable condition." 'Reasonable' seems to include a dented rim. You can see one side in the first, and then the dented side in the second photo (north north-west). What do you reckon, does this look like the sort of thing that can be bent into place - i.e. need I not treat it as an exact science - or does this look like requiring a new rim?

    16hp9xv.

    fdg7qp.

    Matt
     
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  2. Think it needs to go to an expert.
     
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  3. Don't know if this will help or not, but hubby hit a very large dip on the end of a country bridge a while back which did similiar damage to his wheel. We just ignored it then as adding more "character" to his bike but for a long time after, that tyre kept losing air pressure and we couldn't understand why. Turned out the damaged rim was causing it.
     
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  4. Go see someone 'old school' like Clive Carter with it... if anyone can roll it straight he will, or Clive will know someone who can.

    I have to wonder about the cost of repair vs. just finding another wheel...and while I realise that you want the retro look, I can't help question the sanity of it...cast wheels were invented for a reason...they're stronger
     
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  5. i think that would be fine. tubed rims dont matter as much as tubeless. the rims on my crf have that many flat spots that they look like 50 cent pieces.

    if you wanted to straighten it all you need is a few blocks of wood and a sledgehammer :D

    what size tyre goes on that rim. if its quite small in the sidewall you will notice it but not if its normal sidewall. also concidering its the rear its not as much of an issue too.
     
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  6. i think that would be fine. tubed rims dont matter as much as tubeless. the rims on my crf have that many flat spots that they look like 50 cent pieces.

    if you wanted to straighten it all you need is a few blocks of wood and a sledgehammer

    what size tyre goes on that rim. if its quite small in the sidewall you will notice it but not if its normal sidewall. also concidering its the rear its not as much of an issue too.

    cast wheels are DEFINITELY NOT stronger. they are heaps lighter though.
     
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  7. I'll take a steel rim with spokes on a trail bike over cast aluminium any day of the week.
     
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  8. Bike Magic straightened the front rim on my old CX, $130 was the damage, but they did a bloody good job.

    Might be out of the question budget wise, depending on how much you paid for the rim though.
     
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  9. The crude old cast alloys on '70s/early '80s Japs are neither. They were a lot cheaper to manufacture though and reduce your parts inventory as well. A 36 spoke wire has at least 74 individual components (excluding bearings, spacers and brake components) which have to be assembled and trued, most of which had to be done by hand at the time. A cast ally rim is a single piece requires casting and then fairly simple machining, both of which could be largely automated, even 35 years ago. The driving force behind the move was economics, not engineering.

    Of course, as the modern sports bike evolved during the mid '80s, things improved.

    As for the wheel in question, I can't see the photos. However, just on general principals, as long as it's still round, within specs and as long as it's laterally true apart from the dent, within specs, I doubt if you'll have a problem with a tubed tyre. Tolerances for wires are pretty loose. I can't remember the exact numbers, but a couple of mm in either direction is quite acceptable. If it's steel it won't have been significantly weakened. If it's alloy, I'd examine the bent area with a magnifying glass for any visible cracking. If the isn't any, I wouldn't worry about it.
     
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  10. +1 Pat.
    The spokes look pretty rusty though.
     
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  11. Thanks guys. I'll take it to Craig of Mischief Makers in Brunswick, who I will be getting to help me with any metal work in conversion anyway. Hopefully we can just bend things into a workable shape.

    I'll give a good going over with sandpaper and whatever else to preserve and protect it. I am trying to keep this a budget conversion, otherwise I'd spend the money on mechanically more important things.

    The good thing about this wheel is that it'll just bolt in to the SR, no mods needed other than a tab welded because my swingarm is designed for a diskbrake rear.
     
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  12. Make sure the bod doing the welding knows what they're doing. It's only a little component, but a drum brake torque arm letting go is likely to kill you 'cos it irretrievably locks the wheel.
     
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  13. :eek: Thanks Pat - when Patb says it might kill you, it's time to pay attention :LOL: Fortunatley Craig's pretty capable - he's the guy who built the bike around that 400cc triple engine for a Chinese company. He's been building and racing sidecars etc since the 70s. A boilermaker etc etc.

    I don't like death.
     
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  14. Probably nothing to worry about there then :grin:.
     
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  15. A little bit of worry is always good, let's you know you're alive

    (and might soon not be)

    !
     
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  16. has anything happened to that? That project was the most interesting things that was recently happening in the bike world.
     
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  17. Ash's Spoked Wheelz can fix your dubious hoop; phone (07) 3262 6447 or go to ashspokedwheelz.com.au

    there's a pile of boutique bike fixers advertise in Cycle Torque too, MUST be one in Melbourne, surely?
     
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  18. I've now had a look at the wheel building chapter of The Vintage Motorcyclist's Workshop. It reckons a max of 3mm radial eccentricity and 1mm lateral wobble is OK for a newly built wheel.
     
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