Welcome to Netrider ... Connecting Riders!

Interested in talking motorbikes with a terrific community of riders?
Signup (it's quick and free) to join the discussions and access the full suite of tools and information that Netrider has to offer.

Right Leg At The Lights

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by Bravus, Sep 22, 2013.

  1. I tend to split to the front at the lights but stay between the lines of cars (I know that's not everyone's preferred approach).



    When the lights change and I launch I tend to keep my right leg hanging out there a bit - not a long way, just a little. Left leg is changing, but not putting the right straight on the peg means I have a few more weight options to pick when lane I'll head into. I'll always be across the intersection before the cages have moved much at all, but sometimes the guess of which will go harder has been wrong - and some extra mass means I can make the switch easier.

    Yeah, I guess this is close to a 'which glove?' thread topic, but what the hey, it's something to talk about.
     
     Top
  2. I used to be the same but riding the posti bike all day and using 90% rear brake I think I have converted. Also with the ZX being geared taller I really don't need to change gears in a hurry I'm normally done and dusted to safety in 1st gear and short shifting to required gear after that
     
     Top
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Right foot should be on the peg to cover the rear brake in case of that slightly too spirited getaway lifting the front wheel more than was desired....:)
     
     Top
  4. Ah, yeah, there is that. I hope I have enough throttle/clutch control to care for that, though...
     
     Top
  5. Both legs up and out of harms way for me.
     
     Top
  6. You can't change lanes with your right foot on the peg?
     
     Top
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Not what I said. On a medium launch with the front getting light, it's *easier*.

    In the same ballpark, though on a much smaller scale, as all the MotoGP riders who stick a leg out in the air on turn-in.
     
     Top
  8. I'm tall enough to plant both feet on the ground when stationary.
    I leave the bike in gear, never neutral, in case I have to drop the clutch if I spot any trouble coming my way.
    On take off, I put both feet on the pegs as ASAP. I mean, how can you claim to be in control of a bike if your legs are dangling like streamers, acting like unbalanced counter weights and not on the controls.
     
     Top
  9. Racers sticking their leg out has more to do with balance under braking into corners, bugger all to do with taking off at the lights IMHO. But hey it's your leg put it wherever you like.
     
     Top
    • Agree Agree x 3
  10. My right foot is already up on take off. Left comes up as soon as I move.
     
     Top
    • Agree Agree x 3
  11. I do it sometimes, makes me feel like a moto go rider launching at the start of a race ;)

    497B5BF0-48D9-4D17-B281-9EA7E3DD9EE4-3459-000002BD9E39BEAC_zpsbfcee90e.
     
     Top
  12. I get both my feet up onto the pegs ASAP,
    Don't need to leave anything dangling out in the breeze and I'm not in a GP1 race so I don't need to hang a foot out when braking either.
     
     Top
  13. Lots of possible different approaches, and all's good, do what you want, but since I brought it up I might as well response to the most egregious misunderstandings.

    Heh - shoulda known the GP reference would bite me. No, I don't think I'm a GP rider. But as someone said above, they do it for balance, I do it for balance (under a different circumstance) - it's an outrigger of sorts.

    Dunno if you've heard, but they've developed these things called 'bones' and 'muscles' and 'nerves' now. We can actually control our legs, actually very, very finely. Which is what I do.

    Maybe the mental picture isn't clear enough. It's not at 90 degrees to the bike or even 30 - maybe 10 if that. And it's forward of the pegs. Little more weight forward means harder launch with the front wheel on the deck... (I know, tiny difference.)
     
     Top
  14. So do you have left,right or both feet down at the lights? Should really be left so you can hold the bike in place with the right on the footbrake. It's not normally a real issue until you pull up somewhere on a hill. Left foot down reduces the need to control accelerator and brake with the same hand.

    I occasionally have both feet down at the lights, and then leave them off the pegs for a few seconds, because I like the feel of it. But I wouldn't recommend it to anyone.
     
     Top
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. I split up the middle and as a come to a stop I stock both legs out 'Cossack' style and support myself on the car doors.
     
     Top
    • Funny Funny x 7
    • Like Like x 4
  16. You should never put your right foot down at the lights. Leave it on your brake and put your left foot down.
     
     Top
  17. Will holding the clutch it at the lights cause it to wear significantly more as opposed to leaving it in neutral?
     
     Top
  18. Not a factor in my book, I like to be ready to go….
     
     Top
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. yes
     
     Top

  20. I think it CAN cause some wear to the throw out bearing, and also the springs, but I think anything like that would only be noticeable with EXCESSIVE clutch holding, day in day out for years on end.
     
     Top