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Riding With Balls

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by Bravus, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. ...the balls of my feet on the pegs, I mean!

    Just started working on this, partly because I tended to drag my toes before the pegs because my left foot (sitting with the arch of the foot on the peg) was under the gear lever.

    Pluses include lots more clearance and a 'sportier' feel, along with some extra feeling of 'suspension' from my legs for bumps and so on.



    Minuses include that it takes an extra millisecond or so to move my foot forward to the rear brake, and that I have to move forward to change gear, so I tend to change less frequently than I would otherwise.

    What do people do/think about foot position on pegs? Should I keep working on instilling this new habit?
     
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  2. hey bravus... I tend to do this when riding in twisties, it get the body setup a bit more resposive than flat foot riding. You tend to push more on you rearsets teh spring effect takes control of you thighs and claves... oh and when you push on one rearset more than the other the weight distribution moves, and so does the bike.


    oh if you crash.. balls meet tank... tank meet balls and they dont 'play' nice .... painful experence..
     
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  3. I also like to use the balls of the feet, especially around corners, but also over rough road surfaces.
     
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  4. Yep. I generally ride with my balls on the pegs...

    :LOL:
     
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  5. A mate of mine recently had his foot kinda fold under the bike going around a corner because he had his food forward under the gear lever... :shock: he was only wearing shoes so it just bent a bit strange and snapped back, but if he had've been wearing something more restrictive (like his boots) it would've been much nastier. Since then he's toes on the pegs whenever he's not gearing/braking (and so am I :p).
     
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  6. I tend to have the ball of my left foot on the peg, but with my right foot i like to have it resting above the leaver in case i need it for an emergence stop.
     
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  7. HEHEHE yeah i destroyed a pair of shoes on saturday
     
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  8. i also tend to go with balls of feet... but mostly as a result of years of horse-riding :)
     
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  9. The thing to avoid is duck feet. Where the toes are pointed away from the bike. Putting the feet back a bit on the pegs helps this.
     
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  10. I tend to have my feet ready for frequent gearing & brakes (heels), but for turns and twisties I pull them back (balls) 'cause I seem to scrap my boots otherwise!
     
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  11. when i am riding upright, my feet are normal like horse riding but when i am entering a corner, i use the ball of my feet on the pegs otherwise it stresses out my leg and feet. scraping your toes around a corners is a scary feeling
     
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  12. Normally i ride with the arch over the pags but in the twisties i ride on the balls of my feeet for the extra clearance
     
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  13. Top marks mate for the topic title... Certainly had me thinking, rofl! Anyway upon reading it, yeah I ride the same way. I was thinking of having the gear lever adjusted so my foot sat flat with the lever below my foot, but... uhhh effort... then the lever will be pointed down.

    Anyhow yeah I usually put both feet, balls on the pegs when I'm up to speed and riding. I was going to ask something about that myself, I did it at the riding school too when I went for my L's not long ago and they didn't say anything about it, so I just guess its all up to personal preference.

    Glad i'm not the only Ball-Rider.
     
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  14. Yeah I would say keep on going with it, cos it does help with suspension feel.
     
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  15. Hi Bravus,

    This is the way I (have been taught to) ride. It allows you to shift your weight around more easily, and gives better ground clearance. As for braking, you probably should be looking far enough ahead that you don't need to react instantly on the rear brake. You've also got your front brake, which is going to be doing the majority of the braking in any case.

    Phil

    PS you're still at UQ, aren't you? Still haven't met up for that coffee....
     
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  16. Hi Bravus,

    This is the way I (have been taught to) ride. It allows you to shift your weight around more easily, and gives better ground clearance. As for braking, you probably should be looking far enough ahead that you don't need to react instantly on the rear brake. You've also got your front brake, which is going to be doing the majority of the braking in any case.

    Phil

    PS you're still at UQ, aren't you? Still haven't met up for that coffee....
     
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  17. doooooood

    2 weeks ago, i had my feet in the pegs-in-arch-of-foot position and when rounding a corner on the marvelous Clyde run i hit a TRPM (or cats eye) with my toe and am still carrying a limp....

    do whats comfy for you ;)
     
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  18. When going through the twisties, put more weight on the inside foot to help the turn - reduces the need for counter-steering. Also drop the inside elbow.

    If however you start to lose rear grip then stomp on the outside peg.
     
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  19. The way they teach it at the Metal courses is to put your arch on the pegs for the majority of the time but shift the inside foot to the ball when cornering hard.
     
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  20. Yeah, I'm moving more to what Sarsippius describes, because I miss the gear and brake access if I ride on the balls *all* the time. Just slipping that inside foot back on a corner (where I have no right (rear)braking or changing anyway) works well to avoid the toe-scrapage.
     
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