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Riding in slippery mud

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by aquasj79, Jun 18, 2016.

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  1. Question for the experienced riders here. I would like to ask for your tips and advice for riding my cruiser in slippery mud. The sort of mud that isn't deep, but perfect for 'fish tales' in the car, just on the surface of gravel. The next thing is - the mud is on a hair pin corner. I am going to need to get the bike to town soon for fuel - don't want to have to use a jerry can if I can avoid it and don't want to be a 'fair weather' rider either, the challenge some days can just be getting to the bitumen... Thanks in advance!


     
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  2. Nothing wrong with being a fair weather rider....myself I would be using a jerry can. Why risk it?
     
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  3. The only problem with that is the bike would live in the shed for the next 3-4 months!
     
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  4. Feet down, just like wet roads only 1000% more gentle on the controls. I have struck mud that full knobbys didn't work on, like soap or grease so take extreme care, corners are even harder if its slippery. Just hope it doesn't build up on the tyres. Be slow enough so you dont need to brake.
     
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  5. Me, I am not that experienced but I know i loathe the scenario you asked about. I hate dirt, I hate mud and I hate wet weather lol
     
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  6. if you don't have to then don't do it. if you want to give it a go just take your time, don't use too much lean angle, use gentle engine braking and rear brake where possible and do not use the front brake with any lean or when the front wheel is anywhere but pointing straight ahead. chopping the throttle on a loose or wet surface may overload the front tyre and end with you and your Honda in the mud wondering what happened. be careful!
     
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  7. I don't mind gravel on the road caz64caz64, I have 1.2km of gravel before I get to bitumen. It is just when it gets wet it gets slippery and up here in the hills that happens fairly quickly. Thanks ZimZim and chilliman64chilliman64 I don't have to do it, but I would like to practice doing it when there is no pressure. I am sure that the bike is capable, it just building my skills. So, I thank you for your tips. The mud I expect will build on the tyres, so it will be a case of being slow on the road until I can get it cleared as well. I will also make sure that there is someone around to pick me up and Honda up if needs be!;)
     
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  8. My advice on slippery mud on road tyres is screw that shyt, stay home! If you have knobbies, however, it's party time!
     
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  9. And as hard as it seems, relax the arms, stay loose....and look where you want to go. Easy to follow the ruts if you're not careful...
     
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  10. And there are certainly plenty of those!
     
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  11. No shame in having your outriggers (feet) out, slow and steady, no front brake, easy throttle, no sharp turns. If on on incline, stay on the upper side of the track as mud/ water will pool in the lower wheel track. Once you get on the tar, take it easy until the mud spits off the tyres.
     
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  12. If you're that worried stop and walk it around the corner. If you do ride, keep it in a high gear to make it harder to spin the rear up. My first off was riding slowly in mud, rear spun up and whoops. Being inexperienced I was in first, the guy ahead was in 3rd.
     
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  14. So thanks to everyone for their tips! I have now managed to conquer the driveway a few times and have been taking full advantage of the break in the weather to practice some winter riding. I have been riding my beautiful bike to work. This gives me the experience of riding in the cool/cold morning and the dusk/dark of the evening. Roads that are intermittently dry/wet. Just plain slippery. But this morning I had a moment of 'divine intervention'. Missed my alarm and decided to take the car instead of the bike - just rushing too much to take the bike safely - pulled out of the driveway on to the bitumen and there in front of me was a tree across both lanes of the road. Thank goodness for 4wd!
     
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  15. There would thousands down in the State forests after the recent weather.Makes trail riding interesting. I have even seen one down across 95% of all 4 lanes of the Old Pacific Hwy just after a blind bend ,that got my attention real fast.
     
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  16. I am sure that it did! ZimZim
     
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  17. Cruisers really aren't built for dirt. The weight and ergonomics all work against you. It's often hard to get your feet in a position where you can transfer some weight off the saddle and onto the footpegs but if you can then that's a good thing. Personally I don't like running with the feet down. If you're in dirt boots, with flat souls that's one thing, but if you have a heel to catch on things then that can go bad very fast. If a 300kg cruiser does go out from under you you're not going to catch it by having your foot down on slippery mud anyway. You can also get your leg caught under the foot peg, which usually means instant fractures although this is less likely on a cruiser if there are forward controls..

    On slippery surfaces the rear wheel will tend to slip downhill. Weighting the pegs and leaning the bike to keep it perpendicular to the road surface while you keep your body vertical and over the centre of mass of the bike can help with directional control. Keep the speed down, let the bike move around under you as it will, you will have a better connection to the bike and better control with your feet on the pegs than sliding along in the mud. The front won't steer well as you have certainly realized and will feel really insecure, and you really don't want to lean much to corner so a dab of back brake or a twitch of throttle can shift the back wheel to line you up for the corner more effectively than trying to steer the front wheel. This stuff is much easier to manage on a light trail bike, but the same principles apply to a limited extent. If you can borrow a trail bike to get the feel for slippery surfaces, the skills are transferable, and the repair costs are usually smaller too.
     
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  18. Good to hear you go through it for now.

    For mud, I will simply get off and walk the bike. Often you can find a path around it to walk the bike. Best idea is to walk through you route first, if you find it too slippery to walk, forget about even walking or riding your bike through it.

    Get a trail bike if it stops you from riding 5 months of the year.
     
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  19. Thanks for that fatbastardfatbastard A lot of what you said makes a lot sense. The bike certainly does move a lot and you can certainly feel the rear wheel slide. I do let it move and feel it. Gentle controls, not rushing and relaxing myself help immensely. So, did a big dose of cement to give it a go!
     
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  20. A couple of cement tablets always beneficial :).
     
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