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Rider down Reefton

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by brainz, Feb 21, 2016.

  1. #1 brainz, Feb 21, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2016
    I don't know if it is true but apparently it was a fatality, if so my condolences to the riders family...


     
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  2. he was a friend of mine.. taken too young RIP bro.
     
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  3. Condolences..

    Read about that in The Age as well...
     
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  4. hope you and his family are ok
    don't discount counselling if you think you need it
     
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  5. Just found the report.
    Condolences to those and theirs.
     
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  6. Yes Condolences to the family and friends...
     
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  7. Touched a nerve with me also.
    I was almost taken out the exact same way a few hours ago...
     
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  8. My observations on both reefton and black spur are that there are so few opportunities to legally pass. Coupled with cars etc very rarely using the slow traffic slip lanes, pressure builds and riders take additional risks.
    On black spur specifically, the main opportunities to pass are where the police are known to camp out.

    The GOR is another example.
    The slow traffic slip lanes are considered nothing more than a courtesy should you wish to go out of your way and do someone a favour.
     
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  9. So sorry to hear about that fataility. Condolences to all involved.

    Fixed it for you...

    One of the problems with those sorts of police action (at least I find for me) is that I actually feel discouraged to not overtake on those safer straights because of the higher chance of being pinged for safer riding but exceeding the limit momentarily, thus I'm discouraged from waiting for those "straight" opportunities. The end result (again at least for me) is seeing other areas with less straight or visibility as an opportunity to overtake as well.

    I end up having to battle it out using will power to choose not overtake at other more riskier but less patrolled locations (almost like the old cartoons with an angel on one shoulder, and a devil on the other). But at times I've failed. I'm human, and there have been times where on a bike a rush of blood, plus the frustration of inconsiderate drivers leads to me taking extra risks, when I end up shaking my head about what I've just done moments after. I'm getting better (in that those incidences have decreased), but it's taken time to learn, and thankfully I've been blessed without having an incident when I've made foolish decisions. I dare say I'm not the only one.

    I'm not blaming the government or police's policies for those bad actions I've made - but likewise they're certainly not discouraging me from them - quite the opposite.

    I don't know what the solution is. Personally I'd like to see more discretion by the police - allowing for safe overtaking in limited environments such as the straight on the black spur even though it means allowing us to exceed the limit - but I know there's jack all chance of that happening. Maybe making it mandatory for slow vehicles to 'turn in' and those failing to do so could be fined? I'd hate to go down the 'tougher laws' approach but with some of the inconsiderate drivers out there who don't care - I'm not sure what other options there are. I know some people who have used intercoms to advise riders behind whether the road is clear, or if there's oncoming traffic. All in all, it's a tough problem with no apparent solution.
     
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  10. Ditto for The Bells Line of Rd and Mac Pass in NSW, come to think all of the roads that now have stupidly lower speed limits, that used to be 100 and now are 80 or 60 to save up from ourselves.
     
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  11. The death on the Reefon was a policeman,
     
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