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RGV250, NSR250 as learner bike?

Discussion in 'Bike Reviews, Questions and Suggestions' at netrider.net.au started by benni boi, Apr 6, 2005.

  1. Gday guys, have been told that 2 stroke NSR's and RGV's aren't good for first time riders.
    Have a mate who has no previous riding experience, and he's looking at getting a rvg250 or a nsr250. Do ya rekon that'd be too fast for someone inexperienced or that you could learn slowly???
    I was leaning towards a zzr or across, but prices r good on a few of these bikes, whaddo ya all think?



    Cheers
     
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  2. Not just the top speed - the interesting torque curve, warmup time, and increased maintenance are also factors.

    Oh, and I think the NSR250 is a kick-start, too.
     
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  3. They are only as fast as the rider chooses. If hes a nutbag he shouldnt be on a bike period.

    All the garbage about 2 strokes being difficult to ride is just that, garbage. They are a great bikes, fun to ride and different from the norm.
     
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  4. you cant deny that they are more difficult to ride than a 4 stroke, theres much more to think about. they're not THAT hard to get a hang of if you already know the basics, but when your trying to get the hang of taking off without stalling, low speed cornering, throttle control etc it wont make things anywhere near as easy as riding something like a ZZR.

    but yeah, a bike is always only as fast as a rider makes it. its just when the rider doesn't MEAN to make it fast but it goes quick anyway, that worries me :LOL:
     
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  5. All RGV's & NSR's are kick starters.

    I bought my NSR250 in November as my 1st bike, only ever rode the CB250 at HART before that.

    But I ride for leisure and not for necessity. I don't think they are suited for long distance commuting tho, more of a weekend fang in the hills. I wouldn't waste the mileage on the freeways anyways :p . They are a joy to ride tho :LOL:

    I don't believe it was that hard to get used too :? , but then again the NSR has a more linear power curve than the RGV. Sure I stalled it a few times at the beginning, but isn't that expected of a learner anyways?

    I've now clocked 1500kms on it and can honestly say I know where my limits are on the stroker and not where the stroker's limits are :shock:
     
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  6. Havn't ridden a 2-stroke, but i got a couple of mates with an RS125 and an RGV250. They think they are fun as all hell, but need to be rebuilt every 5-15 thousand k's to keep them in A1 condition mechanicaly
     
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  7. What? :shock: Don't your mates put oil in their bikes? :LOL:

    If you thrash the living feck out of the bike (yes, I know it's hard to resist that temptation on a stroker) then that would be true, but if you maintain it properly and fang it in moderation, then you'll get more mileage then that before a top end is required. Pretty much the same with all bikes.

    My mate had clocked over 30,000kms on his NSR250. He had made some mods (installed pod filters) but didn't rejet accordingly which lead to a seized cylinder (running too lean). My bike has just ticked over 20,000kms and it's still strong as. The cylinders have been compression tested and it's still on the money :D

    2T top end rebuilds are cheap as and if you have mates that know their 2T shit, it's even cheaper :D
     
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  8. Well I'm gonna throw my 2cents in on this one.

    The power and torque curve on the NSR is very flat in stock form (45ish HP). Unless you start tuning them they are quite easy to handle power wise. They are also a very well balanced easy to handle bike.

    It all comes down to the brain of the user. If you have someone that doesnt have the fear factor they will wipe themselves out on a NSR, RGV or a 50CC scooter. It comes down to a state of mind and self control. If you dont have it and you're riding a bike of any kind you are bound to find yourself in strife.

    The other thing to consider is that old one about 2 stoke maintenance. Bollox! Properly cared for these bikes require very little and are simple enough for DIY repairs and maintenance. No timing chains, valves, cams, adjusters, sliders, shims that require real technical ability.

    Another one you get is the "Oh but they rev so hard!" so they wear out quick theory. They redline at 12,000 rpm ignition cuts at 12,500. Take a look at the redline on a CBR or Across and tell me which one is working harder.

    And the final part of my rant. You hear so many giving the advice buy a crap 250 as you are only going to want to sell it when you get off your restricitions and get a real bike like a 600, 750 or 1000. I'm 38 I have an unrestricted licence and have no intention of jumping onto a bigger diesel. In the right hands through the twisties these bikes can be far more exciting than a diesel 600 or 750 and even give some of the bigger bikes a nudge.
     
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  9. ... this guy knows his 2T shit! :biker:
     
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  10. Can you confirm whether they're a kick start? If so, how hard is it to kick start one of these things on a cold Melbourne winter morning?

    I keep wanting to get a stroker, but keep deciding against it because of practicality issues, my bike being my daily commuter and all.
     
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  11. that he does....
    he even has his NSR as wallpaper on his desktop here at work 8)

    ciao
     
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  12. Pretty much all the strokers are kick starters, but I believe some of the more recent Aprilia's are electric start.

    I haven't had my bike that long to experience Winter yet, but I have started it in very cold nights. I think it also depends on the condition of the bike which will determine the number of kicks it will take to turn her over. Mine will usually kick over in 2-4 kicks.

    Yeah, I would too if my NSR looked as sweet as Bryan's. At the moment, thumbnail form looks best for mine :LOL:
     
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  13. Yes they are kick start. My NSR starts from cold 3rd kick everytime regardless of temp. Once its warmed up it goes 1st kick most of the time.
     
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  14. They can be pigs to start if they are low on compression, or have charging/battery issues.

    When I got mine it had a shagged battery and took about 35 kicks to start. Now it takes 2 to 3 from cold after having laid dormant for a week.

    They're not like kicking a diesel though far easier.

    I definitely wouldnt class mine as a daily commuter though.
     
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  15. [/quote]

    Can you confirm whether they're a kick start? If so, how hard is it to kick start one of these things on a cold Melbourne winter morning?

    I keep wanting to get a stroker, but keep deciding against it because of practicality issues, my bike being my daily commuter and all.[/quote]

    If you're intrested I'm more than happy to meet up and discuss the pro's and cons face to face. Jezza myself and another NSR owner are going smoking through the hills this Sunday
     
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  16. 'Smoking' apt choice of words?

    :D
     
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  17. See? that's the thing. I want all the good things about strokers but none of the bad. Maybe I should just own two bikes...

    nah.

    I take it they're a poor commuter because of the small usable rev range and the riding position, right?
     
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  18. .......

    just got my RS250 but i dont think im ready to go smoking any hills ....

    please let me know of your next time :D
     
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  19. If you're intrested I'm more than happy to meet up and discuss the pro's and cons face to face. Jezza myself and another NSR owner are going smoking through the hills this Sunday[/quote]

    If Pete can get the Across to behave on Saturday I'll be joining people for the Sunday blast. I don't think Across is up to a twisties run, though.

    Are you coming to coffee on Friday?
     
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  20. is coffee still at sth bank tom nite?
     
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