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Review: Aprilia RS125

Discussion in 'Bike Reviews, Questions and Suggestions' at netrider.net.au started by Rashpocket, Oct 8, 2009.

  1. So iv owend this bike for a few months now and i thought id throw a small write up together mainly for those new to riding, to help in the process of purchasing your new bike; or for those older more experienced riders that are looking for a bit of fun.

    KarlFullerAprilia%20RS125%20-%202003.



    This is an exact replicant of my bike.(i cant find my digital camera)

    A 2003 RS125.
    Usually sell between $3000-$7990(RRP)
    I got lucky and caught mine for $3000 in nice condition with under 10k kms on the clock.


    Riding Position and Comfort Levels
    Me being 6'2 and 75kgs the bike is a little cramped but it is not too bad. Although i did ride it from Sydney where i bought it back home to Condobolin (600 odd kays) i pretty much got off it at home and went straight to bed and sllept for the entire next day :p. With its extreme sporty riding position it is hard to travel long distances without stopping for a rest. i stop every 200kms for a break and a rest. The bike weighs something like 115 kgs dripping wet so its really easy to flick around and to dominate, i do it easily and im only 75kgs!

    Cockpit and Levers
    The person who had the bike before me loosened the clutch lever so it wasnt as hard to pull, i find this really saves your wrists when riding long distances and it helps new riders, so their hands dont fall off before they discover more comfortable riding positions. All switches and really big and require a simple flick of the thumb or forefinger to operate so its very easy for new riders to pick up.

    Maintainence and Fuel Efficiency
    This is a big issue for these Two stroke screamers. when i bought it i only did 1000kms on it before my dad and i had to replace the piston and rings due to the lack of compression and expected wear and tear on a highly strung engine. One must constantly check Oil levels and refill appropriately every 2-3 tank fulls. I usually get 210-260 kms to a 12litre tank. It depends on how you ride it really.
    Caution: If you are buying one of these 2T bikes that are nearing that 9,000+ kms mark you may have to sit it in the garage for a week or two to overhaul the top end.(it needs to be done every 10,000 kms or so).

    Engine Capabilities
    Wow, just wow.
    The Days in the garage are worth it!
    To be frank if you dont like loud noises this bike is not for you.:music:
    Just to get off the mark these bikes need about 3,500 rpms to move in first gear. It is sort of easy to stall when beginning but practice makes perfect and it rewards you in the long run with the ability to detect the friction point (releasing the clutch just enough to start moving)with ease. These bikes will happily sit on 100km per hour all day. Living out West iv been lucky enough to conduct my own experiments with top speed :twisted:.
    In Top gear (6th) doing 12,000 rpms i hit 150 km per hour. but she revs right through to 14,000 rpm so im guessing this would top out at 170-180 km per hour. The power certanly comes on waves when you hit 8,000 rpms and it is similar to using Nos in a Need for Speed game if you have never exerienced it before.(thats the only way i can describe it!)

    Cornering and Braking Ability
    Well the first time i took it for a test ride, i was an absolute squid so...
    i was testing the front brakes with four fingers, similar to using push bike brakes eh? WRONG! i ended up with the fuel tank crashing into my nuts! and doubling over in pain!:cry:
    But on a serious note the brakes are excellent and only 1-2 fingers are required to bring you to a complete stop.
    This bike to so light all you have to do is think of tipping into a corner and your already scraping pegs!(jokes) but really it handles like a dream, cannot fault it there.

    Conclusions
    While it may not be the most practical bike ever made, the Aprilia RS125 sure as hell would be one of the most fun to ride. I use mine as my main transport and it has never missed a beat. These bikes can cruise around doing 110km per hour without entering the beast known as the 'powerband' so there is no real mad rush on the bike but the powerband is nice to have if you need a sudden burst of speed or just want to flog it through those twisties!:twisted:

    Hope you all enjoyed my review of the Aprilia RS125 (even though it may be slighty noobish)
     
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  2. Nice review, pretty much spot on with my experience. Only thing I'd ping is that my user manual states the bike weighs 139kg with full tank, ready to ride. Quite light for a bike, anyway.

    Ditto the long distance thing, its a bit frantic but very enjoyable. I'll probably keep mine after I get my full licence just so I can jet around on it every now and then - they really are a bundle of fun.

    Top speed should be around ~170km/h in 6th @ 11 to 12k rpm. Many bikes have been geared down one tooth on the front sprocket to 16 teeth - standard is 17. This allows you an easier walk (scream) off the line and a bit better (better???) response to throttle input. I'd say its well worth the trade off and won't worry you unless you're fond of doing over 120km/h for extended periods.

    Needless to say I procured a larger sprocket for my bike :D

    Cheers all - boingk
     
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  3. If I had the spare cash I'd get one of these for the rides up and around here. Not crazy fast so you become a pedestrian, quick enough to have fun and certainly hard enough work to ride to make the journey worthwhile.

    Now, about that money...
     
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  4. how hard is it rebuilding? will it be something easy to pick-up for a total noob?
     
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  5. Congrats on the bike! I'm looking at a '99 RS125 with 15,000 kms and the seller is asking $4,250 for it, does that seem a bit much for it's age?
     
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  6. Nice review...

    The second time you do this I think you will find the time it takes you to rebuild will go from 1 to 2 weeks :)shock:) to just a coupla hours...
     
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  7. If it's had the top end rebuild done, that is a bit high.....if it hasn't, it's exorbitant! Check all the usual things that can go wrong with the bike too.

    If you wait long and hard enough you can pick up a new shape one for a little more cash, it's got braided lines as standard :)
     
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  8. have heard they are fun

    you never know what happens down the track ;)
     
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  9. i just bought one! and love it!, i bought it and rode it for two weeks straight, the other day i jumped back into my fzr and couldnt find the fkn controls! clutch is way out there, gear lever is so high!

    that being said tho, i find that the rs125 handles well yes! but, its an odd kinda handling! its not your normal bike. to turn, you really, REALLY have to lean into it, the bike wont let you just twist the bars, that being said! its great great fun!

    i gota decide which bike to take for an hour long trip, its mainly highway, so i think the fzr will be it, but that being said, they would both be tight :D

    cant wait till i get the cash to fully derestrict the beast!

    woop!
     
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  10. Not sure about the rebuild, but I've since found a few 2001 models interstate for a tad under $4000, so I'm chatting with the sellers to see what kind of condition they're in. Patience would probably pay off in the end, but I'm very impulsive :) They both have pretty low kms (~15k), but even so, I don't think I'd mind doing the rebuild myself. The kit seems to go on ebay for ~$100, not too shabby...
     
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  11. can they really rev to 14k rpm??? :eek:hno: That seems a bit high.
     
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  12. Not really....

    My ZZR250 revs to 14k. A lot of the supersport 600's rev above 15k. The cbr250 revs to about 18k or 19k...
     
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  13. Mine goes up to 12k only...but it does get there. - Current model unrestricted with FP Arrows exhaust.

    Only negative with this bike is the lack of straight line power (low end torque as well) and it gets some vibes due to being a smoker.
     
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  14. good vibrations :)
     
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  15. I'm looking at the RS125 for my first Learner bike as I've heard that for someone quite small as myself (150cm/45kg) that it'll be easier to handle (being light and all). However, I'm seeing a lot of "rebuild" changing of "pistons" etc and I have no mechanical knowledgeable whatsoever, would this still be advisable for someone like myself? TIA
     
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  16. If you're not mechanically knowledgeable then I probably wouldn't recommend it. Another light and manageable bike would be a Honda CB250 or CBR125. The CBR125 especially would fit you well, I remember seeing somone about your dimensions riding one at my P's course and thinking it must've been tailor made for them.

    The RS125 is actually a fairly sizable bike, almost on par with many 600cc supersports - seat height is 820mm, which is getting up there. Although you could definitely learn to replace the top end yourself, the size seems to be a main issue here.

    Cheers - boingk
     
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  17. hey guys i just spent the best part of a week and a half on an rs125 for the first time...a girl i know owns it and it needed some servicing...
    as with most 2 strokes they always seem to undergo some tinkering by previous owners..this one was way out of tune...but i soon sorted it out..... they are a great lil bike forget them being simply a learner bike ...they are a proper motor cycle...i found by replacing the carb 2 a 34mm made a great improvement but the stock one also does the job fine....they are very easy to work on..tank hinges up for easy access..rebuild is pretty straight forward...if u can undo a nut u can do it...just take time and get lots of info on just what to do...
    the worst thing i found with this bike is the vibration...such a buzz box...i advize that u constantly check for loose bolts and nuts use loctite where u can..as they vibrate loose...
    It is a very committed bike ..ridding position and engine power delivery is very race orientated and even tho im a lover of all things 2 stroke... its not the best thing to ride around day to day...but i would still prefer it over a 4 stroke cousin cbr etc . this is mostly to do with the lack of torque which has more to do with it being such a small capacity and not the type of engine it is...i was a bit disapointed with the power too, i expected more from the rotax power plant. i was speaking to mechanic and dyno tuner and he was saying that the best he has ever seen out of one is 20hpr..!!!!and that had a performace chamber .....

    at the end of the day when buying any bike take them for a ride only u will know whats right for u...
     
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  18. Thanks Everyone! There's an RS125 I'm interested in, asking price is $4200, 1999 model and it has just below 10,000 k's on the clock. However, the Owner mentioned that she purchased from a Mechanic who rebuilt the engine, does the engine of an RS125 need rebuilding eventhough it's only done 10,000 k's on the clock or is it likely that the k's got winded back down?

    It seems to be in great condition mechanically though. Red book price is maximum of $3300 so it's a bit overpriced but she states that it's in excellent condition. No service/log/maintenance books. I'm just really baffled why @ 10,000 k's (seems good for the age) that rebuilt was needed.

    Any info? Is this a good buy?
     
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  19. yep a rebuild at about 10,000 sounds good.
    as the engine is smaller, it works harder than a larger engine needs to, to make power.
    and anyway. a 2stroke rebuild isn't a big deal at all compared to a 4stroke rebuild you may be thinking of.
    there will be tonnes of info if you google the right words.

    it's a fantastic little bike but not for everyones taste.
    living with an rs125 can be a bit of a chore day to day, but it can all be worth it if you love corners...and eventually learn to love the smell of twostroke oil :)
     
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  20. I'm a Learner, happy to learn to work with my bike but at the same time I don't have any mechanical experience. Would this bike be too hard?

    It's actually done less than 10,000 k's at the moment, she has owned it for 18 months, the engine was rebuilt before she purchased the bike, does that sound too early? I'm scared that the purpose of the rebuilt was bad.

    Lastly the asking price is $4300, is that reasonable? I'm planning to use it for weekend rides, not a daily commute, would this be hard to maintain with my limited experience for weekend use?

    TIA
     
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