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Rear Stand alternatives?

Discussion in 'Maintenance and Servicing' at netrider.net.au started by oldcorollas, Jan 31, 2015.

  1. A friend with an SV650 has trouble getting bike on a rear stand to clean/lube chain... (and that's all she needs to do..)
    basically, with the usual geometry (eg, Anderson space saver stand) the weight required to lift bike (~70kg) is higher than her body weight :D
    but the stand is trying to lift 130kg, 8cm off ground. not needed for justcleaning chain..

    the newer Anderson with larger wheel and adjustable height makes things better, but a few quick calcs leads to.. longer is much better... but a 1m long stand takes up a lot of space in a unit garage situation..
    graph.

    most stands are 60cm long, so can reduce force required by making lift height less, by using larger wheels, or by making longer (all favourably change lever ratio)


    but as an alternative to a proper stand, there are lots of bodgy/DIY alternatives, eg https://netrider.net.au/threads/diy-rear-stand.133428/#post-2368915

    proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fs10.postimage.org%2Fcave7wnix%2FIMG_20120701_151904.

    but if one lacks the muscles to lift the bike anyway.. need a lifting version of that.

    a couple I've come across are:

    Tommyjack http://www.on-bike.com/sportsbike-wheel-lift.htm
    http://www.webbikeworld.com/r3/tommy-jack/
    but need to put pin in while loaded.. that requires some kind of co-ordination..
    tommy-jack.

    PACKJACK http://www.packjack.ca/ really simple! but when kicking it out.. the SV650 has a pretty floppy sidestand, esp when the bike has been lowered.. front brake on and occy strap on sidestand will help but...
    step2.
    step4.




    then there are various DIY like the turnbuckle jack
    IMG_4303.

    but one that has caught my eye is: http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15766&page=2
    this one bolts to spool location on swingarm, but thinking to make something that levers on the spool itself = no bolting/unbolting..
    001-InUse.
    002-FromTop.
    003-FromBottom.

    any suggestions for neat tripod type stands, that actually lift/lever the wheel off the ground?
     
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  2. another neat solution uses a ratcheting cargo bar as donor..


    motojack001.
    71skwCJc89L._SL1185_.


    and there is always the "lift n lube".. similar to packjack, but I like packjack idea better
    attachment.php?attachmentid=81650&stc=1&d=1207791484.
     
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  3. #3 oldcorollas, Jan 31, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2015
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  4. They're hardly compact but swingarm pivot stands have some pretty decent leverage.

    swing_arm_pivot_stand_3106.

    That ratcheting cargo bar idea looks pretty good too.

    Honestly though, in a pinch I find a car jack on the RHS swingarm pickup does the trick. Just start slow to make sure the knob isn't going to slip off the jack.
     
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  6. the rollers are nice, but again require co-ordination :)

    Tommyjack was not easy to use? not stable?

    had thought of converting a trolley jack with a U-shape bracket on top to go onto spools, and extended splayed sides of the jack body..
    but that requires $ and I'm aiming for a near-zero-$ option :)
     
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  7. yeah was looking to use that swingarm pivot stand type design, lever on sidestand side seems more stable for those of lighter stature.. but again, needs length to reduce the force required.
     
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  8. When caught without a rear stand I have used two scissor lift jacks from the car. You put one under each swing arm or the rear axle bolt and slowly wind then up until you get the rear wheel an inch of so off the ground. If you're careful it works well, not ideal but they do at a pinch.
     
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  9. #9 Reesa, Feb 1, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2015
    They require no more co-ordination than getting a bike off a centre stand does.

    I use one of these. It's easy to roll the bike on - doesn't require a great deal of strength, just need to put a block of wood under the side stand.
    http://shop.peterstevens.com.au/CARS00002/Cruiser-Rollerstand/pd.php
     
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  10. Weld a socket to the end of the bikestand and put a breaker bar on it to ge more leverage
     
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  11. On a "standard" geometry stand, would need another 80cm length to get to 30kg force.
    That means you are nearly 1m behind the bike, so it makes it much harder to hold onto bike to maintain stability. Still means need to lower lift height as well as length = may as well make a new one

    friend can't move bike while sitting on it (short legs) and has some trouble rolling bike around garage (all strength is directed at keeping bike upright... if it goes down, it stays down :D )
    Can't see her being able to manoeuvre onto a roller, even with long low gradient ramps.

    hence looking at simple versions to left rear right side of bike.

    scissor jack with modified base to allow it to push up at an angle might work. an appropriately shaped slot on the pad would prevent spool slipping off. will look into that
     
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  12. My wife can handle both her track bike circa 185kg and her road bike circa 200Kg easily with the new model of Anderson rear stand and head stand on her own. She's 50kg wringing wet.
     
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    • Like Like x 1
  13. I have already prescribed a course of physical exercise ;)
     
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  14. If you are outside and have a helper, you can get lift up the rear wheel by using the side stand as support, the other person can turn the wheel and lube (or the other way around).

    But yea, Packjack is a handy tool to have especially for overnighters. I have it and find it easy to use, though I don't like the sharp corners.

    I have since installed a center stand and found it invaluable.
     
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    • Like Like x 1
  15. Very neat and there are a few variations of this type of stands, though hardly portable.



     
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