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Question on gear changing

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by Owen, Nov 8, 2006.

  1. Just wondering what aspect of a bike denotes how often you need to change gears? For instance i wanted to get a gs500 becuase its a twin and i thought i would change gears less than a 4cyl. Is this true?


     
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  2. How long is a piece of string.

    Generally speaking twins have a broader spread of torque than fours of similar size but it really depends upon the state of tune.
     
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  3. double the distance from one end to half :LOL:


    On a serious note, it also depends on how YOU want to ride. Sometmes for typical sedate riding, I change at anything from 4000-6000RPM and when giving the bike a burl, 8000-14000 RPM. It is whatever you feel comfortable with as long as the motor isn't chugging to the max or about to explode (but even then it's not always a bad thing) :)
     
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  4. What i mean is, my firend on his guzzi le mans can do a whole set of twisties and change gears maybe once, powering through each one, where as i will change anywhere from 1st to 6 in the same set of corners. Is it what they call 'lazy power' because the guzzi engine is so much bigger?
     
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  5. What i mean is, my firend on his guzzi le mans can do a whole set of twisties and change gears maybe once, powering through each one, where as i will change anywhere from 1st to 6 in the same set of corners. Is it what they call 'lazy power' because the guzzi engine is so much bigger?
     
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  6. the size of the engine does have a lot to do with it
    my BF rides through twisties on his CB1300 & barely needs to change gears at all.
    Me on my CB250 however am constantly going up & down gears in a pathetic attempt to get power out of the beast! :LOL:
     
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  7. Ah, well, that's different again, 'cos the Guzzi is not just a twin, but a V-Twin, and a much bigger motor than the GS Suzuki of which you speak. If you genuinely don't want to spend all your life while riding changing gear, why not look at a cruiser, and have a relaxed ride?
    But to get the maximum performance possible out of the GS, you're going to have to 'row it along' on the gearbox anyway.....
     
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  8. Nah not into cruisers. Just thought i would check though, just wondering if the GS will be the same as my zeal, having to rev up to 10k before changing gears then down shifting 3 gears before a corner etc if it is, im still getting one lol. Im assuming the GS being a 2cyl revs lower than the zeal (with redline at 15)
     
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  9. interesting given the bike you ride.

    Have you ever looked at comparative dyno charts?

    4's shit all over the twins for 'broad spread of torque'

    Look at the plots for the 600 4's vs the 650 twins, or the gsxr750 vs the 748 or the R1 against the vtr's
     
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  10. The gearbox is only there because engine's don't produce maximum torque across the entire rev range. So yes a broad torque curve means less gear changing but of course gear ratios play a part too. The higher the maximum speed of the bike the less flexibility you're going to have with each gear.
     
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  11. at legal speeds in australia, the litre bikes of the past decade don't seem to have any trouble just using the first one in the box. Aside from a little more clutch slip at the lights, you can punt most of them around in 2nd or 3rd only without worrying about a lack of pull from idle.
     
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