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Proper PSI for CBR125?

Discussion in 'Bling and Appearance' at netrider.net.au started by Peaches, May 15, 2008.

  1. Hi Guys,

    Need to fill Peaches’ shoes with the correct PSI before my first Old Rd Run this Sat (yay!). Problem is, I can’t seem to find the “correct†PSI figure online. :?

    And wait! Before you say “read the manual, idiot!†– I don’t know where Jeff’s put the manual. And I don’t think he knows where it is either. :roll:

    So… er… help?

    Thanks!



    Xoxo
    R
     
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  2. Hey Peaches,

    It's on the swing arm - from memory front = 29 and back is 33

    Cheers
    Starlet
     
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  3. :eek:

    Is that the case with all bikes - that they're printed on the swing arm? Neat!

    Now I feel like an idiot :oops:

    Kewl, thanks Starlet!

    xoxo
    R
     
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  4. I think so, you're welcome :)
     
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  5. Sometimes the chain guard. :)
     
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  6. And almost definitely the owners manual. :p
     
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  7. And how do you plan to check it/them?

    Do you have a good, pencil gauge? They are more accurate than dial type gauges.

    Remember that the pressures given are for cold tyres. Even riding just a few hundred metres flexes the tyres enough to increase the psi by around 2.

    So if you can only check them on a servo gauge (and the ones at Safeway/Woolworths fuel outlets with the electronic readout appear quite reliable) then make sure you set it to 31 and 35 F & R.

    Cheers

    Trevor G
     
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  8. OK, so 31 F and 35 R?

    or is it as Starlet said: 29 F 33 R

    I'm forwarding what you've said to Jeff because I have NO idea how to do it. He'll have to show me and I'll do it for the first time this Sat :)

    Thanks all, most helpful!
     
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  9. Your manual is probably under your pillion seat (it it hasn't been removed from its default location)

    You can access it using your motorbike key (the keyhole is on the left of the bike under the pillion seat)
     
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  10. 29F and 33R as measured when cold (if those are the right values).

    Not worth trying to guess how warm your tyres are after a run but if you have to go to a servo to inflate them then you might have to. The higher values were a guestimate based on tyres being warm.

    If you have to go to a servo, at least check the pressure before you leave so you can see the difference, and use the same gauge at the servo.
     
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  11. Peaches, you could just buy yourself a digital gauge for about 30 bucks and a foot pump and do all this in the comfort of your own garage....or someone else's if the bikes are still hidden away. :)
     
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  12. In other words, if you have your own gauge at home, you check them before riding. You set them to the cold pressure.

    If you have ridden the bike in the last hour or so, you set them to the warm/hot pressure, which is about 2 psi extra.

    Cheers

    Trevor G
     
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  13. my sticker on the chainguard that displays that info has faded away on my bike :(
     
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  14. O I C. Thanks, Trevor :)

    Oh, and I don't have a digital gauge. As for a foot pump, what kind of foot pump are we talking about? The ones that you can use for pushies? Sorry if it's a dumb question, I'm very new to riding.

    Thanks!

    xoxo
    R
     
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  15. Those footpumps are complete crap. I had one for the pushy, lasted all of 3 months before the seals failed (and less than a minute before the metal frame twisted up).
    Better off buying a 12v electric tyre pump from an auto store and a decent pressure gauge (or buy a decent tyre pump and it comes complete with a gauge). If you plan on riding bikes for a while it's definitely a good investment rather than relying totally on servo tyre pumps and gauges.

    Edit: Oh and don't make the mistake of assuming a digital gauge is more accurate than a dial - it's not always the case.
     
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  16. Sorry if I seemed to be implying the digital gauge was in some way superior. It's just more convenient to read. :)

    FWIW, I've had one of those poxy foot pumps down at the farm for about 15 years and it's still going strong. I bought one of these the other day: http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/products/products/56701/michelin_single_barrel.html It looks nice (irrelevant), seems reasonably sturdy, and mine isn't 22psi out only about 2...
     
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