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Proper grammar and riding

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Ljiljan, May 8, 2012.

  1. Just occurred to me that I will typically say that one person rides, but two people ride, ie, third person singular present tense verb is rides, third person plural present tense verb is ride - which kinda seems a bit odd.

    Is this correct use?
  2. yes

    and more letters to make five
  3. Isn't it the same with most verbs? One person plows, two people plow, one person watches tv, two people watch tv?
  4. Hmm, now that you mention it that does appear to be the case. And it switches between first person and third person.
  5. i dun ride a bike n that
  6. That's good England
  7. Velcome to Engleesh langauge, made from leftovers, refined by centuries of mutation ;).

    But at least this particular example is consistent -- there are plenty more that are both strange and exceptional.
  8. The New European Language!!!
    Writer Unknown
    Read Aloud For Best Effect!!!
    The European Union commissioners have announced that agreement has been reached to adopt English as the preferred language for European communications, rather than German, which was the other possibility. As part of the negotiations, Her Majesty's Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a five-year phased plan for what will be known as EuroEnglish (Euro for short).

    In the first year, "s" will be used instead of the soft "c." Sertainly, sivil servants will resieve this news with joy. Also, the hard "c" will be replaced with "k". Not only will this klear up konfusion, but typewriters kan have one less letter.

    There will be growing publik emthusiasm in the sekond year, when the troublesome "ph" will be replaced by "f". This will make words like fotograf" 20 persent shorter.

    In the third year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible. Governments will enkorage the removal of double letters, which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes of silent "e"s in the languag is disgrasful, and they would go.

    By the fourth year, peopl wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing "th" by "z" and "w" by " v".

    During ze fifz year, ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou", and similar changes vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters.

    After zis fifz yer, ve vil hav a reli sensibl riten styl. Zer vil be no mor trubls or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech ozer.

    Ze drem vil finali kum tru.
  9. You reminded me of this:

    A poem on the difficulty of pronouncing English
    Dearest creature in creation,
    Study English pronunciation.
    I will teach you in my verse
    Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
    I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
    Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
    Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
    So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.

    Just compare heart, beard, and heard,
    Dies and diet, lord and word,
    Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
    (Mind the latter, how it’s written.)
    Now I surely will not plague you
    With such words as plaque and ague.
    But be careful how you speak:
    Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;
    Cloven, oven, how and low,
    Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe.

    Hear me say, devoid of trickery,
    Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore,
    Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles,
    Exiles, similes, and reviles;
    Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
    Solar, mica, war and far;
    One, anemone, Balmoral,
    Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel;
    Gertrude, German, wind and mind,
    Scene, Melpomene, mankind.

    Billet does not rhyme with ballet,
    Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
    Blood and flood are not like food,
    Nor is mould like should and would.
    Viscous, viscount, load and broad,
    Toward, to forward, to reward.
    And your pronunciation’s OK
    When you correctly say croquet,
    Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
    Friend and fiend, alive and live.

    Ivy, privy, famous; clamour
    And enamour rhyme with hammer.
    River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
    Doll and roll and some and home.
    Stranger does not rhyme with anger,
    Neither does devour with clangour.
    Souls but foul, haunt but aunt,
    Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant,
    Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger,
    And then singer, ginger, linger,
    Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge,
    Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age.

    Query does not rhyme with very,
    Nor does fury sound like bury.
    Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth.
    Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath.
    Though the differences seem little,
    We say actual but victual.
    Refer does not rhyme with deafer.
    Foeffer does, and zephyr, heifer.
    Mint, pint, senate and sedate;
    Dull, bull, and George ate late.
    Scenic, Arabic, Pacific,
    Science, conscience, scientific.

    Liberty, library, heave and heaven,
    Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven.
    We say hallowed, but allowed,
    People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
    Mark the differences, moreover,
    Between mover, cover, clover;
    Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
    Chalice, but police and lice;
    Camel, constable, unstable,
    Principle, disciple, label.

    Petal, panel, and canal,
    Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal.
    Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair,
    Senator, spectator, mayor.
    Tour, but our and succour, four.
    Gas, alas, and Arkansas.
    Sea, idea, Korea, area,
    Psalm, Maria, but malaria.
    Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean.
    Doctrine, turpentine, marine.

    Compare alien with Italian,
    Dandelion and battalion.
    Sally with ally, yea, ye,
    Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key.
    Say aver, but ever, fever,
    Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver.
    Heron, granary, canary.
    Crevice and device and aerie.

    Face, but preface, not efface.
    Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass.
    Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
    Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging.
    Ear, but earn and wear and tear
    Do not rhyme with here but ere.
    Seven is right, but so is even,
    Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen,
    Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk,
    Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.

    Pronunciation — think of Psyche!
    Is a paling stout and spikey?
    Won’t it make you lose your wits,
    Writing groats and saying grits?
    It’s a dark abyss or tunnel:
    Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale,
    Islington and Isle of Wight,
    Housewife, verdict and indict.

    Finally, which rhymes with enough –
    Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough?
    Hiccough has the sound of cup.
    My advice is to give up!
  10. I've got an anthology of Anthony Burgess's journalism ("Homage to Quert Yuiop"*) sitting within arm's reach of the toilet at home. For those of you who only know him as the author of Clockwork Orange, he's well worth checking out in greater depth, especially since he was one of the great polymath's of the 20th Century. Aside from being a novelist, poet, playwright, composer, essayist, and fuck knows what else, he was also a linguist and philologist with a handle on more languages than you and I have fingers and toes.

    It's great for dipping into an discovering stuff you had no idea about, and weird how often you'll read something, and then it'll come up in some other context a short time later.

    Anyway, just by coincidence, this morning, sitting on the bog, leafing through Burgess's upteenth review of dictionaries and lexicographical and linguistics publications, I discovered his review, from 1978, of the first issue of the Journal of Creole Studies (or some such), which referred to the hypothesis that English first emerged as a creole. Fuckin interesting!

    (* All of the collected articles were for newspapers and general reading magazines rather than academic stuff, and most are highly entertaining. If you're passing a second hand bookshop and see it in the window, it's well worth picking up.)
  11. ...1 rider = caaaaarnnnnnnn...
    ...multiple riders = cunce....
  12. Given that "English" varies so much, within a country only about 800 km long from tip to tip (not counting Scotland or Wales), that inhabitants from the more widely separated parts can barely understand each other's spoken language, I'm not entirely sure that "correct" has much meaning.

    I'm not just talking about accent either. At a rough estimate, the everyday spoken vocabulary of the average native Geordie is probably 30-50% incomprehensible to the average native Cornishman and vice-versa. Grammatical structure doesn't vary so much, but "English" as spoken by the two of them is only barely defineable as a single language.
  13. Never mind.................