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Pirelli Angel ST

Discussion in 'Tyres' at netrider.net.au started by Ozrider58, Apr 12, 2011.

  1. Have had the pirelli angels on my bike for a bit over 6,000 k and thought it was worth a bit of a review.

    Riding has included touring to Falls Creek, a squirt along the Tolmie-Whitfield road and along the GOR (Apollo Bay - Warrnambool) and a fair bit of commuting in Melbourne's wet summer.

    I had Bridgestones b45s on the bike before these.

    The first thing I must add that this is a step up from a cross ply to a radial.

    The angels were good right from the start even riding home on a wet night after getting them fitted.

    The big difference I have noted in these tyres is the front end stability over rough or rutted roads.

    The second is the controlled lean in on the twisty stuff - its not a quick fall into the lean or neither is it a wrestle to get it over.

    My bike is shaft driven and has the small step out on the back wheel when heavy engine breaking is applied. This sometimes tests a tyre particularly in the wet but these havent given me a problem.



    But what has driven me to write this review is the wet weather performance especially in the downpours we have had recently. The wet weather performance has been fantastic even in a couple of heavy breaking situations there has been no sign of letting go.

    Finally after 6,000k the wear is not great and it looks like there is another 6,000 left in the rear tyre easily.
     
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  2. nice, i was astonished at how good the tyre performed in the wet too - very confidence inspiring. I changed from 2CT's to these and never looked back.
    currently trying the dunlop sportsmart on advice from the shop but may well be going back to these next time round. they have a totally different feel. need a few more ks to decide though.
     
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  3. I've had mine om my sv650s for 17k. The rear still has a few k left and the front needs changing. I agree both Ozrider andjlyon, they are very good in the wet and have excellent control on twisties.
     
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  4. What pressure are you guys running on yours?
     
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  5. I run what honda recommend for my bike 38f 42r
     
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  6. Thanks, that may also answer one of my delayed n00b questions - do you run to the bikes recommendation or the tyre. My bike says to have 2.4 bar in both so ~35psi. I'm just finding I'm not very confident with the front.
     
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  7. 17k from a set of tyres ,the best i get from just about ny tyre is 6 k front,7 k rear.Tipping u dont hit the twisties that hard
     
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  8. As a general rule, pay more attention to what the bike manufacturer says than the tyre manufacturer. The tyre company may imagine that their tyres will be going on a rather different bike to yours. Read your bike's owner's manual.

    Also, some very fast riders run their tyres quite soft - track or street, and that makes them warm up better, but it also makes the bike stand up in corners and feel very mushy. The relevant question is not 'What would Valentino do?' - the question is 'What's going to work best for you?'

    On an FZ6-N (a bike I quite enjoyed, myself) 35 cold sounds about right. Try them at 32, then 30, then up to 38 and see which direction feels better. Also - are they new tyres? Is the bike new to you? What sort of tyres are they? Does the bike feel like it wants to tip into the corner, or does it feel like it wants to stand up and go straight? As a general rule, if it tips in too quickly or easily and feels like it wants to keep leaning more and more until it hits the ground - reduce the pressures. If it feels like it wants to fight you and stand up and go straight, and you need to keep steering into the corner to hold it down, then increase the pressures.

    You should need a moderate and reasonable amount of steering input to tip the bike in. Once it is at the desired angle of lean, you should be able to stop all steering input, and the bike should stay at more or less the same lean angle without any input from the rider. If it wants to fall in, or stand up straight - that isn't right.
     
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  9. Hi Kneedragon, thanks very much for your comprehensive response - it's been very useful! Unfortunately the FZ6 took a slide down the road after trying to do a headspin on wet tramlines and so it's now resting in bike heaven. The new ride is a 990 Super Duke (a rather glorious silver lining to the demise of the FZ6!)

    The tyres had (at a guess) a couple of thousand k's on them. I think a combo of new bike and different tyre profile was exacerbating my initial hesitancy. After reading you rpost I have had a play around from the KTM recomended pressures and gone only 1 psi under (34psi front and rear). Now it may be imaginary but I do feel that it has really helped. The previous owner was running them a bit hard I think.

    I'm still a bit undecided and need some dry days to get into the hills more to really get them warmed up ;) After picking up my GFs CB900, at this point I still prefer the Conti Road Attack 2's I had on my old bike and are also on hers.

    Thanks again for the knowledge - I'm also planning to keep testing the pressures on a decent run.
     
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  10. Overall I've liked my Angel STs (front has done about 14,000, rear about 11,000) on the Tiger 1050.

    Probably got a few thousand more left in them at a guess, maybe a little more. My Tiger's been through two sets of Pilot Road 2s and they both did ~16000 on the front and ~13000 on the rear to the wear bars.

    I've enjoyed the more aggressive profile compared to the Pilot Road 2s... Quicker to initially tip-in and much more stable once actually leaning. A little greasy when cold but otherwise they've been well behaved.
     
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  11. I've now got almost 8,000 on my Pure front and Power rear, on the ZX14, and they're at about the legal wear limit, and the grip, handling, and warm-up are all starting to suffer quite badly. They've reached the point where I really don't like them much at all, now, but for the first 5 ~ 6 I have no complaints and quite a bit of praise.

    The Pure front doesn't seem to steer as well or offer the same precise feel as the older Power. That said, I've not had a Power front on this bike, so it's hard to make comparisons. I have no complaints about the grip, before 5,000 anyway. I can get both my knee and the footpeg on the ground on the 14, and she has her preload wound up quite a long way. Lack of clearance isn't a problem, so I guess grip is every bit as good as it needs to be. I don't think the level of feel and feedback from the front Pure is quite as good as the Power was, but again, I haven't tried a power on the front of this beast.

    The Power on the rear can go off, and bikes like the 14 and the 'busa can make that happen pretty quickly. Overall grip goes away a bit, the transition between hooked up and sliding gets quite wide and a little vague, but I find it's very progressive and forgiving. The major change is that the bike suddenly starts to feel a little bit loose, like a jelly. It doesn't exactly become unstable, but it does start to move around significantly more. This is actually not a bad thing, because it's very noticeable and distinctive, and it's a very clear warning to be careful and slow down a bit. I haven't had the pleasure of getting the 14 on a track yet, but I would imagine that after one 10 ~ 15 min session in (say) medium group, it'd be quite loose. I would not do back to back session on these tyres, on this bike. They are sporty road tyres, not track tyres.

    As a sporty road tyre, on a larger bike, I find them hard to fault, at least for the first 2/3 of their wear / life. I do find now that they're old, that cold grip is pretty ordinary, and they take longer to warm up, and you're beginning to tread a rather fine line between going hard enough to get some heat into them, and going too hard on cold tyres. Even when warm, unhooking the rear with power can be unexpectedly easy, compared to the very impressive grip they had when new. It's perhaps unfair to single them out over this, because it's something pretty much all high performance tyres have in common, but I'm noticing it.
     
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  12. had my st's for a while now... maybe 3-4thou, not sure.

    excellent tyres! ive never had anything super sticky but these are just great, dry and (excellent in the) wet.

    sometimes they feel a bit slippery, but thats starting out later at night and sometimes in the wet, but havent had them slip out yet :)
     
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  13. Am up to 20k on mine now. But have a slow leak in the rear. Got it "fixed" but still slow leak.
     
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  14. I missed this before but that nails it! That's a good descriptor of what I have been sensing. I am getting more used to them now and more confident in their abilities though.
     
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