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New 250s?? Where have they gone??

Discussion in 'Bike Reviews, Questions and Suggestions' at netrider.net.au started by pete the freak, Apr 24, 2006.

  1. So I was just doing my weekly trawl of the big 4 bike manufacturers websites (Suzu, Kawa, Honda and Yamaha) and noticed what I think is an emerging trend.

    The ZXR has gone from the Kawa model list, the CB whilst still on the Honda list has been discontinued, the Suzuki site is only promoting one 250, a cruiser... What is going on?

    Suzuki only have the VL250, a cruiser.



    Yamaha only have the V Star and the Virago, two cruisers??

    Kawasaki have got 3, ZZR, GPX and the Eliminator.

    Honda are only showing the new CBF, VTR and the 05 CB.

    That's a total of only 8 new 250's (9 if you include the C8) from the 4 major companies. 4 cruisers, 2 sports bikes and 2 nekkid bikes. Not much choice is there??

    Is it LAMs?? Is ti the grey imports? Am I just hella bored at work and making something out of nothing??
     
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  2. unfortunately there isn't a huge market (worldwide) for 250's... hasn't been for quite some time...
    I think that due to the low demand for brand new 250s is seeing the drop in production?!

    I too am bored at work... only about a dozen people here 2day compared to the usual 150+ people... it's a slow day in the office :LOL:
     
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  3. I don't know why you're surprised, nothings changed in at least 5 years or so.

    Sure theres been more 250's at times- yamaha SR250, Honda NSR150, yamaha Zeal are some 90's examples. But those bike's you've mentioned have been the core of the new 250 market for ages.

    I think there's nothing wrong with it. If you want a cruiser, you've got a couple to choose from. A sports bike, the kawasaki's, or the VTR for a naked. If you want a basic begginers bike then the CB is the go.

    There isn't much choice, but what's there is great.

    The most interesting thing in your list though is the CBF250- you complain theres not enough choice, but that's actually a new bike for 06, so the range is bigger than usual.

    Looks like a decent bike- I like singles, so I'm fan of the powerplant. Not such a fan of the styling though. Honda have obviously gone all out to try to make a "modern" looking 250, but I think it looks much yukkier than the CB ever did. You can't beat classic lines. It looks much too plasticky and disposable.

    The worst thing about the CBF250 is that it'll mean the death of the beloved CB250. I can't imagine what it would be like learning to ride in a world without CB250's.

    I like the engine (more powerfull than the CB donk, with single cylinder character- very necessary 6 speed too), if only you could get a bike with CB250 styling, with a CBF250 engine.

    While I'm on a rant, Honda Australia's importing regime is very annoying. They choose to introduce the CBF250- 2 years after it's european release. But what's really annoying, is that they haven't chosen to introduce the extremely popular CBF500- this bike is the GS500 killer in Europe, and would be the best LAM's bike around.
     
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  4. I was always a bit surprised by the fact that there haven't been many new sports style 250s in the past 8 or so years. I mean, I'm coming from the performance car world, where going 8 years without a new sports car is unimagineable! So moving into bikes - a very, very new adventure for me - it was really weird to see that all the sports 250s on bikesales.com.au are 10 or more years old! But yeah, thanks to this thread, that makes a bit more sense now. :)

    Hyosung for me!
     
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  5. dont forget hyosung. they have 250 naked, half faired and faired in the comet, and they have the aquilla, in 250, and both come in restricted 650cc form...
     
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  6. Yes, I think there is a trend. For example Honda used to have three machines - CB250, Shadow(?) and VTR. Now CB250 and Shadow are dropped and replaced by CBF, while VTR is hanging on... for now.

    It seems Australia was deemed unprofitable in this segment of the market. It is not a worldwide thing at all - there is huge market for under-250s in Asia and all other parts of the world in fact except the US. Even Europe, I just went to Dutch site motorfreaks and they are talking about a new Yamaha 125cc... I doubt it very much it will be brought to Australia!

    The good news is, once LAMS are adopted Australia-wide, scarceness of 250s won't matter so much anymore. I imagine the way this will work out is the market will separate and specialise: people who want small, light machines under 500cc will get scooters, while larger capacities will be still served by motorcycles.
     
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  7. I think there will always be a 250cc market for people who want to commute but don't like scooters, but this group of people is not so worried about performance hence the lack of investment on new machines.
     
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  8. Oh yeah, there are people like that - myself for example. But these people will manage without 250s; they might prefer a bike but if it comes to that they'll say 'oh, whatever' - and get a scooter, perhaps one with larger wheels. Or else they will go up in size to 500cc. I ride a CB250, but I could just as easily be using ER-5 or GS500, they would serve my for purposes just as well and their running cost would be only slightly higher than CB250.
     
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  9. Try having a look at the Japanese websites (usually .co.jp). The 250 Hornet and Kawasaki Balius are still in production (both parallel-4s but naked), the rest of the range seems to be more scooters and motards (although the ZZR is also still available). Obviously this must be what the Japanese market wants (no manufacturer is going to care what the Aus market wants) - although I believe the biggest selling class in Japan is still the 50cc category (ie cheap commuters). Annoying thing is that 400cc bikes are still quite popular in Japan yet we don't really get any of them out here - even though many would probably come in under the LAMs limit.
     
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  10. The reason they are talking about 125's is that they can't ride anything more than 125cc and 12ps as learners. One of the major reasons for the decline of the 250 was the reduction in the E.C from 250cc to 125cc for learners. There never has been a 250 learner limit in the USA so this left only Japan as a viable 250 market (We are too small to really influence policy). The asian market is saturated with 125's and 175's because the vast majority are bought for simple economical transport and while volumes are huge, the model range is limited.
     
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  11. I baught a brand new Kawasaki VN 250cc Eliminator (Cruiser) last Augast. I did alot of research prior to getting the bike, and it was interesting. The guy at parks kawasaki who sold me the bike, said from Kawasaki's point of view , the must sell a min of 15,000 units world wide of any one particular model to warrant production. I have another theory, well at least as far as Japan is concerned, and perhaps some Euro companys, I am thinking of cars , you see the jap cars privately imported, eg: toyota lexus coupe, which were complianced built in the early 1990's , take a look at what you could buy new from the Au Toyota dealers at that time, I think we are getting passed over, mearly a dumping ground for certain models perhaps.
     
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  12. Most people see their 250 as a temporary bike, and something they don't want to invest too much money in. Add the fact that we're a tiny market, why would there be any more 250s around than there is? Seems fairly logical, from a business point of view.

    A 250 isn't a sports bike, regardless of how fast it's styled. Ok, the 2-strokes have some poke, but you're not comparing apples with oranges. Consider the new 600s and 1000s - we get a new one of those every 2 years from each of the big four manufacturers. Given how tiny the market is compared to the car market - I'd say we're doing damn well in that regard!
     
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  13. What like the MR2 and the turbo, 4WD Celica GT4? :p Problem is that although some manufacturers will design/modify cars to suit the local conditions/tastes the bike market is far too small to worry about Aus-specific models. So basically all we get is whatever US/European models are considered suitable - many of the Japanese models would probably just take to0 much to try and sell outside of Japan (not only the costs involved in compliancing but also having to produce advertising/workshop manuals/parts packaging etc in comprehensible English).
     
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  14. Why isn't it? :-k
     
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  15. Stupid statement, 250 isn't a sports bike, obviously no knowledge or interest in history. Bikes didn't start when you got your's, despite what you may think.
    Manufacturers aren't BUILDING 250 sports bikes like they used to because nanny governments won't allow them to be sold.
    My RD-250 two-stroke would run a CB-750 under most conditions.....
     
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  16. 100bhp does not make a sports bike.

    If you don't see 250's as sports bikes then what do you make of 125's?
    I suppose an Aprillia RS125 or Cagiva Mito is just a commuter to you?
     
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  17. 250's can still be classed sports bikes.
    They do have a 250cc world championship (turn the TV on before the motoGP to find out about this strange series)

    I dont think i would call my little 250 a cruiser, tourer, whatever...

    Its a sportsbike, it may not power the rear wheel up, it may not make my guts swallow its guts, but it handles like a sports bike, and if you keep the revs up through the twisty stuff it feels great.

    Its the same old "only milk and juice come in two litres" bullsh!t statement.

    You obviously need 300rwhp to have fun, so what im having is a spirited cruise that resembles fun at some minute level, but isnt ACTUALLY fun.


    Whatever, im having another beer and waxing my bike....
     
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  18. 250's can still be classed sports bikes.
    They do have a 250cc world championship (turn the TV on before the motoGP to find out about this strange series)

    I dont think i would call my little 250 a cruiser, tourer, whatever...

    Its a sportsbike, it may not power the rear wheel up, it may not make my guts swallow its guts, but it handles like a sports bike, and if you keep the revs up through the twisty stuff it feels great.

    Its the same old "only milk and juice come in two litres" bullsh!t statement.

    You obviously need 300rwhp to have fun, so what im having is a spirited cruise that resembles fun at some minute level, but isnt ACTUALLY fun.


    Whatever, im having another beer and waxing my bike....
     
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  19. In my opinion the 250's are on their way out... Is it Victoria that is the ONLY state without LAMS?? os is there another??

    Any way every manufacturer is pushing OZ to intorduce LAMS... Only HART ear going agianst it as they have the bigest market both in training AND selling new 250's (yes the VTR, CB are the begest selles in the 250 range) Also they do suport the CBR250RR with parts and THAT is a huge $...

    What I do think will happen is the introduction of some of the 400's that are avalable in Japan to take up the hole the 250's will leve...
     
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  20. HART do not support the CBR250RR... I've been to both HART facilities in Vic and they both strongly advise against the bike and push, push, push the CB250 :!: :!:
     
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