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My thoughts and queries after first 200km

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by 2ndclasscitizen, Jan 27, 2007.

  1. I finally got my GPX wednesday and have been riding around since getting back from Sydney yesterday. Just wanted to post a few things I've noticed and odd questions I have.

    First up, the Stay Upright course was really good, the stuff I learnt back in August came straight back, especially looking where you want to go/through the corner, when I really started doing that it helped a lot. Just needed to get up a bit more confidence to take my eye off the front of the bike whilst turning. (Mordeth13's videos helped to, pretty good :grin: )

    Not thinking to hard about what I'm doing helps as well (Stay with me here) The first couple of rides I was really concentrating hard and worried about what I was doing, now that I just let it happen and try and do everything just unconciously it's been much better, a lot smoother.



    Questions:
    1) I find that I can't really control understeer with any really confidence/ability, just back off the throttle a bit, but that's not always best. A couple of times it felt the bike was getting a bit unstable and it wasn't the best way to do it. So what's the best way too stop understeer and get it to turn in more (I kind've thought leaning over more might help, but I don't think I'm at that skill/confidence level yet)

    2) On downshifts I've been lifting my whole foot off the peg to downshift, because the lever seems to be in a bad place for me to be able to just push it down by flexing my ankle. (Upshifts are fine, can do them leaving my foot on the peg) Is that bad? Could it cause hassles in any situations?

    3) Is it normal to have a crap load of fun hammering it up a hill? :twisted:
     
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  2. Try to consciously counter steer. It works a treat at speeds above 20-30Kph. I think one of those mordeth videos talk about counter steering.

    Will
     
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  3. The GPX is an awsome bike to learn on, l am having heaps of fun on mine.
    I have the same problem with the downshift on the gears.
    It would be good to hear from other riders.
     
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  4. you should be able to adjust the gear shifter to fit your foot.
    find this bit of your bike
    1.
    loosen the 2 nuts and spin the rod to raise or lower the shifter. tighten nuts and your off.
     
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  5. Have you got that feeling of going into a corner and the bike just. . . wont. . . turn? You are pushing on both bars, fighting steering inputs.
    Do what Munecito says: Consciously Counter Steer through the corner. If you aren't hammering it, and you shouldn't while practising, when you really Counter Steer the bike will lean over beneath you. Normally this is bad, as you should be leaning with the bike, so practise at a speed you are comfortable with, let the bike lean, and learn from it. Later you can lean with the bike, start moving your weight around, get off the side, or get your knee down. Keep it smooth, finish braking well before the corner, hold the throttle on, Counter Steer through the corner. Fun.
    Read some of the posts by Cathar. Search for others. It's a common topic.

    Also, take a wide line in all corners, and apex late. This works a treat for me and others. I find oversteer more of a problem using this and Counter Steering. I'm always coming close to the inside of the corner, and having to throttle on to widen my line. :cool:
    Read some of Grey Gentry's posts on this.


    Sounds like someone adjusted the position of the lever. Adjust it back. Anyway, you should be riding with the balls of your feet (toes) on the pegs, and only moving your foot forward to shift or brake. Not good if you have to lift your foot too far though. Your foot should sit naturally under the shift lever when your foot is forward, but it should be angled down to do that.


    You bet it is. :grin: It's also pretty normal to scare the shit outta yourself hammering it downhill. :shock: Take it easy though, because if you haven't got the corners right yet, hammering it anywhere is just a little risky. Have fun.
     
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  6. It definately feels like it's turning, just not enough, but I think the turning late might help a lot, I think I'm turning in too close and too early


    You bet it is. :grin: It's also pretty normal to scare the shit outta yourself hammering it downhill. :shock: Take it easy though, because if you haven't got the corners right yet, hammering it anywhere is just a little risky. Have fun.[/quote]

    Yeah, it was just I went for a ride up Mt. Ainslie and just kept going faster and faster (probably wasn't really that fast, it's only a 2fiddy up a steep hill, but anway :grin: )
     
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  7. i remeber when i first started riding, i wanted to try riding harder and faster than i could and i am pretty lucky i got away with no having an accident.
    i find good way to get used to the bike is go thru some twisty roads but take is slowly, there is nothing worse than starting out riding, thinking yer better than u r , falling off caining yerself than hating riding cause of 1 bad spill.

    Take it slow, learn to control the MASSIVE power of the 250 :grin: (it prob feels like it has lots of power) practice the thigns they taught u on the course like looking thru the corners, also think about when yer riding about wat would happen if a car pulled out in front of u or if u see a bit log... just hypotheicals just to prepare yerself!

    Happy and safe riding!
     
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  8. I'm a new rider too and I've noticed myself going wide in tight corners. I assumed I was too chicken to lean further. Is this so or will counter steering help me get the turn in I desire?

    Obviously I'm not doing stupid speeds and so backing off the throttle lets me turn in tighter but what I'm trying to work out is how to keep the speed up while turning in tight corners.
     
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  9. Im fairly cofident with countersteering now and what slows me down in corners is not being able see far enough... so i can pretty much always adjust where my line is because I can counter steer into position.. its the gravel and on coming cars that keep me on my toes and no hanging off the inside of the bike... probably safer that way...

    and with the gear shifter, my gpx was adjusted so the lever was hanging down a decent angle from horizontal, much better now, but i still lift up my foot to change gear - dirt riding habbit i guess
     
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  10. I should note that not all shifters are that complicated - for many it's just a matter of undoing one bolt, pulling the shifter off and moving it up or down one tooth on its shaft.
     
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  11. a gpx shifter is pretty much like that.. 2 bolts on the end of a shaft that adjust the height of the lever... - just looked at mine :LOL:
     
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  12. Ah - guess that just goes to show I've got shifter-brains.
     
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  13. I think mine is like that. So is my foot brake but I don't want to adjust them until after I do my test.
     
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  14. 1) I find that I can't really control understeer with any really confidence/ability, just back off the throttle a bit, but that's not always best. A couple of times it felt the bike was getting a bit unstable and it wasn't the best way to do it. So what's the best way too stop understeer and get it to turn in more (I kind've thought leaning over more might help, but I don't think I'm at that skill/confidence level yet)


    Hi, I'm going through a similar learning process. It seems to help if your weight is on the inside of the bike when you go into a corner. Not necessarily hanging off. The other thing I've learnt is to relax my outside hand so on a right corner for example all the steering input is through my right hand and vice versa. The lean seems to happen all by itself when I get it right :grin: :grin:
     
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  15. Abo Bob, mine was adjusted by the mechanic after I'd ridden 6000... took me a few days to get used to it again, as I kept hitting neutral (some false), so you might be better off not doing anything unless you've got a few days to get used to it...
     
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  16. I have experienced this before.. I ran wide and nearly hit the kerb.. I thought about what I've done wrong and did a U'ie and went back to the same corner and try again.

    1. Adjust my speed before the corner
    2. Check the road surface and Look where I am heading.
    3. Lean and trust my tyres.

    I did it the second round..

    Mistake I made the first round.. I was looking at the kerb when I took the corner.. extractly where I am heading... the kerb..
     
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  17. Most of us make the same mistakes when learning.

    I assume that "going wide in tight corners" means your running out of road on the exit.
    This usually means you've turned in too early. If you turn in early, you will exit early.
    When approaching a corner, even before braking, have a quick peak up the road you want to turn into, or through, as this gives the brain better picture to work with.
    As a guide, on RH corners, follow the left wheel track until you see the corner open up. Use the RH wheel track for LH corners. Learn the lines at a lower speed first, then increase the speed maintaining the same line as you become more confident at leaning the bike.


    Realm shows us what lines in this vid.
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3810918758651059031&hl=en
    Notice that she doesn't apex the corners as you would on a race track. Staying wide, so you can see further through the corner, you can see changes/traffic/rocks/etc sooner.

    Roadabouts are difficult because we need to look where we want to go, but at the same time, check to make sure that the vehicle on the left is going to give way,

    Keep the eyes level, and look where you want to go.

    Good luck.
     
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  18. Hmm, I'll have to think about that when I'm riding next.

    Are you saying a late apex is better than the 'true' apex?
     
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  19. On the road, yes.

    True apexing is for the race track, when you know there is nothing coming towards you and you know that there is nothing on the surface around the corner to compromise your grip.

    On the road, True apexing on RH corners would put your head over the double whites, and on LH ones, sometimes into a cliff, and, but more importantly reduce how far around the corner you can see. Ride around a
    a blind LH corner, both narrow and wide, and see for yourself.

    As we do most of our riding on the road, on roads we don't know we need to see as far around the corner as possible, to look for the line of the corner, traffic and obstacles. And even on those that we do know, we still have to be mindful of sand, oil, gravel, leaves, kangaroos, wombats (sorry Loz, but my guess is that it was just a little cuddly koala, but you wont admit it. :grin:) and vehicles on our side of the road.

    On LH corners we also need to be mindful of oncoming traffic cutting the corner, like they do. But on the wide line we see them and they see us sooner, giving both of them and us, more time to take avoidance action.

    Those wheel tracks are usually the cleanest part of the road. When it is clean, then I like to stay a little wider for better vision, even on roads that I know, but that's me.

    From observations, I've found it easiest to site (read) corners that have the white lines on the edges of the road, like both the spurs in Vic. Some roads only have centre white lines they aren't too bad, as there is still a positive indication of the shape of the corner, but siting the edge of the road can be very difficult as sometimes the road and gravel on the edge are the same colour. (On RH corners, I've actually found myself tipping too early, when I can't positively see the LH edge, even on roads I know. An instinct I am working to overcome.) Road with no lines at all are the hardest to read, as they have no positive indication of the curve, only 2 (sometimes vague) edges either side of the tarmac.

    TOTW talks about reference points. The white lines make it easy to find them, and where you are in a corner, but without the white lines, it is harder to know were you are, and read the corner.

    Also I've observed I still (mistakenly) tip in too early mainly on RHers, if I can't see the edge or think I'm going too fast. I think this is a mistake most newbies make. It's an instinct that is hard to overcome.

    At when turning intersections, when we are busy checking the traffic it is easy to forget to take a quick look through the corner. If we do this before well before we start turning and giving way, perhaps about the time we start slowing/braking we have a better picture of were we want to go.
    I actually struggled negoitating an intersection comfortably, that had a number of bumps in the middle, until I stopped looking at them and just looked through the corner, and let the bike worry about the bumps.

    I hope this helps keeping readers upright.

    Sorry if I've repeated myself :roll:
     
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