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Moving to a higher powered bike

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by panayiotis, Jul 8, 2011.

  1. As a new member of the morotrcycle fraternity, and having read various threads on this forum about larger bikes etc. I have been wondering about the actual differences between riding a lams bike and a 'proper' 600 or 1000.



    My question is more around being able to control it, and ride smoothly. is it really such a difficult task? For example if I ride my gs500 for 2 years, get off my restrictions, im a competent rider, confident enough and decide that I want to buy a litre bike, will I really have trouble dealing with the extra power and speed of a bigger bike? From some of the comments I have read, people comment on how it's completely different and you have to watch out etc etc

    If I cast my mind back to when I first got my drivers licence, I drove my parent's old Ford Fairlane, big car, pretty gutless, but it fit 10 people and was great for driving around melbourne in. I then moved into P plate legal sports cars and since off my P's I've driven, and been lucky to own, some pretty special cars. Obviously on the limit the cars are all wildly different, but driving within the law and about 50% outside the law most cars are easy to drive as the next car. Are bikes really that different?

    So in a nutshell, high and low powered bikes v high and low powered cars.

    My question to you guys on this Friday morning.
     
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  2. Well, if you jump from a 250 to a 1000, you may just be a bit surprised when you open the throttle.
     
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  3. Its different to cars in so many ways.

    I moved from a cbr250 to a SV1000S. Admittedly, its not a super tuned inline 4 1000cc sports bike and it probably weighs more than them anyway, but the difference definately took a while to get used to.

    I found the weight difference the biggest thing. I could throw the 250 around like a ragdoll, but the 1000 is a lot more planted and requires a heap more shifting in the saddle to be able to swing it round corners.

    The power is just amazing. I have had the 1000 for about 4 months now, and have only really given it everything in 1st->2nd->3rd a handful of times, because unless you are somewhere away from traffic, you just can utilise all the power they have. The 250 I could rev out the first three gears and not be going "too" quick, but theres no chance of that on the 1000.

    Cars on the other hand, are different again. Ive had a few decent modded cars and, yes they are different to the last car you have, but nothing gets your heart pumping like the power of a big bike.
     
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  4. Im not doubting that its faster and more direct, but so is a 911 turbo compared to a ford falcon. I'm just saying that given what people say about bikes, my own expereince of the transition in the car seems to way different from what people describe with the transition on bikes.
     
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  5. Each bike has it's own character, whether 250 vs 250 or vs 1000. weight, power, balance, etc - so many variable. A wise man gets to know their ride a little before hammering the **** out of it.

    Take the time early on, don't be a dick and it will be fine
     
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  6. I went from a Ninj 250 to an R1.

    The difference in power and acceleration is phenomenal.

    For the first couple of weeks, I rode my R1 in "rain mode" which dulls the throttle response a little.

    I think as long as you have a healthy respect for the throttle and can resist the urge to give it a handful, you'll be OK from a safety perspective.

    Keeping your licence on the other hand...

    Even gentle throttle roll ons will have you entering "hoon law" territory, very, very rapidly if you aren't paying attention (or if you have a rush of blood).

    Remember. 0-100 in around 3 seconds. 1/4 mile in under 12s. Over 160 km/h in 1st.

    If you've got respect and self control....
     
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  7. Spent a month in India riding an enfield 500 single.

    Day I came back to oz, jumped on my m109 , and all was good until I came to the first corner. Had to wrestle it around!

    Weight is more of an issue than power, your right hand is a regulator not a switch, and smooth delivery let's almost any amount of power become manageable. Having said that, riding a 500 two stroke from the eighties was a real eye opener - power was
    Like a switch , on or off.

    take your time, and it is all good news. Brakes are always a major improvement.
     
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  8. oh yeah...

    How's your fine motor skills? The throttle on my R1 is so much more sensitive than the throttle on my baby Ninja. Millimeters of throttle will cause significant acceleration.

    You don't want to be giving it a handful in or coming out of corners. And you don't want to be chopping the throttle mid corner either.

    The brakes are likely to be much more responsive as well. A litre superbike requires less brake and throttle input. Much less.

    Be gentle. Get in some advanced training. Do some track days.

    PS - I'm a noob.
     
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  9. As Homer would say "are you for serious?" This thread is so funny I love the comparisons etc etc... :rofl:
     
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  10. Don't do it, you'll die.
     
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  11. Lams bikes are proper bikes, you do have to remember that prior to the 70s that a big bike was a 700cc and a CB400 was a mid size.

    You will probably be ok if you move to a 1000cc if you take it easy, in reality you will probably be faster on a 600cc or a 1000cc twin as you won't be worrying about looping the thing so much.

    I bought my R1 a few months ago because I had to own one once, I am not really a sportbike rider more into sportstourers/adventure generally. It is my 18th bike. I am still scared of looping the thing. It is too fast to be fun on public roads generally.

    I would suggest going to the 600 first because Rossi doesn't go straight from the 125 to the MotoGp he had to go via 125s and 250s.

    Remember also it is more fun riding a slow bike fast then a fast bike slow. I tell you that I have more fun on the DR650 on the road than I do the R1. I will be selling the R1 when the weather warms up as I only ever intended to keep it for a short time.
     
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  12. Lams bikes are proper bikes, you do have to remember that prior to the 70s that a big bike was a 700cc and a 400 was a mid size.

    You will probably be ok if you move to a 1000cc if you take it easy, in reality you will probably be faster on a 600cc or a 1000cc twin as you won't be worrying about looping the thing so much.

    I bought my R1 a few months ago because I had to own one once, I am not really a sportbike rider more into sportstourers/adventure generally. It is my 18th bike. I am still scared of looping the thing. It is too fast to be fun on public roads generally.

    I would suggest going to the 600 first because Rossi doesn't go straight from the 125 to the MotoGp he had to go via 125s and 250s.

    Remember also it is more fun riding a slow bike fast then a fast bike slow. I tell you that I have more fun on the DR650 on the road than I do the R1. I will be selling the R1 when the weather warms up as I only ever intended to keep it for a short time.
     
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  13. What...the...fuck....?
     
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  14. Lol you said two stroke :biker:

    An older cruising friend of mine used to ride around in a souped up 750cc two stroke (back in his hay day), the most freighting experinece in his life was his discription lol.

    OP why dont you go middle ground and get a 675 like some people here have done?
     
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  15. I know you have said this as a joke, but its not too disimilar to the comments sometimes aired in threads when someone goes I want to buy a R1 etc when they are currently riding a 250 of some description.

    When someone on a car forum says Im going to buy a 911 GT3 and they currently drive a BMW Z4 for example, people dont say that you need to watch out, its going to kill you, you cant handle it etc etc.

    Hence the question.

    Personally Ive yet to do 200km on a motorcycle, so I am far from looking at bigger bikes right now.
     
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  16. As I said in my above post, Im not even thinking about a bigger bike right now, that's ages away. My question was more due to the comments and how I struggle to understand the difference between riding a high powered bike from a normal one as opposed to driving the same difference between cars.

    I guess its more so I gain perspective as I have up until now been solely a car guy.
     
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  17. Above 10000rpm it wants to be on the backwheel or spinning the rear. That is too fast for public roads.

    I know I am going to get flamed for my comments but people claim yeah I can handle it and its not that bad. It is healthy to have some respect for these bikes. Whenever I see crashes it is always with sportsbikes.

    Remember that people say that I am proof that it is ok, but there are a whole lot of other people that either aren't around or are no longer into motorcycling as they crashed big time. I am sure that all they thought that they could handle the big bike.

    It is healthy to be cautious of the power of a modern 1000cc.
     
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  18. You have to remember that the power on a 250cc bike is 40hp which is about a quarter of a 1000cc four of 160hp. That is a difference of 4 times.

    The difference between a Yaris 160hp and a V8 is 350hp, that is only a little more than twice.

    The difference in a bike is so much difference its more like the difference between a 3 cylinder charade and a bugatti or something. No one ever makes that step though.
     
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  19. The short answer is no, it isn't difficult...it all works the same way, but it is much less forgiving if you do get it wrong or make a misjudgment....being able to make the most of the available performance is an entirely different story.
     
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  20. The difference between bikes is more drastic than in cars.
    The acceleration, the way every little thing you do affects what the bike does.
    The fact that if you roll on more throttle that you're ready for throws you back - which leads to you adding more throttle unles you know what you're doing. And if you panic and do nothing, suddenly you're WFO and heading for a wall.

    Essentially...A litre bike accelerates like a super car. but costs less than 20K Head back to the car forums and tell them you're just getting off your Ls and thinking of buying a gallardo and see what the reactions are.

    Plenty of people have gone from a 250 to a litre bike. But it takes care and a degree of maturity.
     
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