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Motorcycle safety controls

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' started by TheYearOf2013, Sep 29, 2014.

  1. Hi everyone

    Just wanted to ask a question regarding motorcycles safety.

    I understand that if I cannot control my bike properly/ riding well beyond my limits/abilities, etc., and I end up getting involved in an accident because of that, then I am 100% to blame.

    However, I am just curious – what if I drive smart, defensively, passively, very alert, always adjusting my speed to the conditions around me, etc. yet other road users' fault come into play? It really bothers me that quite a lot of motorcycle accidents are caused because other road users violate a motorcyclist's right of way. Not to mention how extremely silly this sounds, other drivers not being able to see you, etc.

    So I am just wondering. Lets say I am a sensible person, level-headed and ride my bike like I mentioned above. Yet there are a number of things OUTSIDE my control, such as other motorists failing to detect me and violating my right of way.....or being rear ended by a car..

    What do you do? Is this just a part of motorcycling that is beyond your control, and you just have to get over it and accept it?

    Thanks everyone, have a great day also.
  2. You can never totally eliminate risk but if you ride defensively you minimise the risk.

    The majority of riders do not get into trouble, which is of little comfort if you are one of the ones who does.
  3. As he said - if you ride like a 'tard you increase the risk of getting hurt significantly, but there is no way to completely remove the risk of injury. You've certainly chosen the wrong pastime for that!
    As in all risk management -assess the risk, put some controls in place (advanced training, road positioning, quality protective gear, etc), then have fun.
    That's life...
  4. How long have you been riding? What courses have you done? Have you been on any rides with more experienced riders?

    To hit a few points up straight away.

    There is very little that is completely outside of your control. If you think there is, then I suggest you either give up riding or make sure your ambulance cover is up to date.

    If you expect drivers to violate your space and not see you, then you'll ready for it.
    If you expect drivers to pull out in front of you, then you'll be ready for it.

    Some tips. When following a car make sure you can see the drivers eyes in at least one mirror - you never know he might just use it and see you. To help with this don't sit in one position behind a car for too long.

    When you're stopped at lights, leave enough room either in front or beside you for an escape route. Leave the bike in gear and keep an eye on your mirrors and be ready to move or even get off the bike.

    Buffer zones - use them - but be aware of which hazard posses the most risk. As someone here learned a while ago, no point moving over in your lane when a truck is coming the other way if you think the bloke in a 4wd behind you will overtake you in your lane.

    If you have an accident and can't or won't work out what you did wrong then either a tree fell on you or you are destined to repeat it.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Riding sensibly and defensively is important. You can never totally eliminate the risk from other road users. Often, the rider involved in a collision with a car or truck has to be taken away by ambulance and your health and safety at the scene are parramount to your recovery. However if you are not serioulsy injured and the other driver claims he did not see you, then that "excuse" SMIDSY is not an excuse but an admission of guilt in that they were not paying propper attention.
  6. Not sure where you are from but neither the Australian Road Rules or the Victorian Road Rules have the concept of right-of-way. They do define who should give way in certain situations but that's not always the same thing.

    If you try to enforce your 'right of way' on a bike you're going to end up squished. You need to remember that people only look for things that can hurt them, for car drivers that's other cars and bigger things like buses and trucks.

    Try to adjust your thinking to avoid placing yourself in a situation where a driver has to avoid you, even if they are supposed to give way. It is every road users responsibility to drive/ride in such a way that avoids an accident, even if the other party is at fault.
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Wokwon is right. There is no enshrined right of way in the ARR's.

    What they do is codify when a road user is to give way... which by implication means that the other road user has "right of way".

    It's a bit of a red herring when discussing R.O.W. violations though - it's pretty clear what is meant, and that's when a car cuts across the path of a bike where the car should have legally given way. And from a riding point of view, always ALWAYS be suspicious of any vehicle that looks like it could cut across your path, e.g., emerging from a junction or driveway, or parked up with it's indicator on about to pull out or make a uturn.
  8. Yeah Rob, I'm more trying to point out that the mindset of "right of way" is flawed when you're not surrounded by airbags. I used to ride/drive that way but woke up to myself before I had/caused any major accidents.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. I saw a letter from a reader of AMCN showing a picture taken of the rear view mirror of a car with a motorcycle behind it. The head light was on and I think the rider was wearing Fluro but not sure. The point of the lettrer was that Fluro was still invisible. I have noticed that although I have very good eyesight, I can see a bike a long way away when the headlight is on, and even when the heatlight is not on, I still see the rider long before I ever notice if they are wearing Fluro or not. My point is that Fluro doesn't make you safer. By the time you notice the Fluro, the rider is already in the danger zone, that is the driver has already entered the intersection or pulled out if front of a rider.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. I agree - there is no right of way. There are only situations where you must give way, meaning other vehicles have priority over you.

    It is a commonly, though incorrectly, used term though and even the NSW government put out a pedestrian safety add about 20 years ago which said "Pedestrians have right of way, ok"

    OP - as I said to you on the other forum, you will not get answers to this which will really help you by reading about it on the internet. Obtain the instruction to bring your riding to a standard where you can pass your riding test, then get further instruction if you then think your riding is still not up to standard.
    • Like Like x 1