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Learning to ride on the road vs learning with QRide

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' started by iamahot1, Nov 2, 2005.

  1. Hi All

    I'd like anyones thoughts on whether it would be more beneficial and better experience to learn riding on the road as opposed to a training centre. Has anyone here learnt to ride on the road? I'm a bit concerned about what will happen if I make a mistake on the road but somehow I feel I will probably learn better this way.

    Opinions guys ?
  2. not sure about q ride but in victoria you are taught the basics of how to control the bike during getting your L's if you can't control the bike when they test you at the end of the day you don't get your L's (fail) so basically they teach you enough to hopefully stay out of trouble the rest is just practice
  3. Michelle,

    Are you referring to advanced riding skills?

    To answer your question, you really need to do both. Both will assist in control of the motorcycle but only one will assist in how to ride in the real world.

    My recommendation..... When you ride in a real environment, ride with someone you trust.... Maybe even pillion with someone you trust to get a feel for what it is like to be on a motorcycle intraffic.

  4. Hi Stewy
    No, I'm not referring to advanced skills. I've only recently got my learners and have done some practice in an open field but I feel I may get more benefit from riding on the road. I actually have pillioned in traffic. My partner is a licenced rider so I do know what it feels like. Its just one of those things where I think experience in the real world may be more beneficial
  5. well i just started on quiet streets, but yeah i personally believe there is no substute for experience and practice in the real world
  6. I think your question sums up most riders.
    ... We are all nervous at the start and don't want to mess up

    Okay, my thoughts on this are probably biased, but I think as much formal training as you can afford should preceed going out on the roads. The better you are at controlling the bike, the more attention you can devote to the cars around you (and sometimes bikes!).
    I am assuming that the training is road biased, and not track related. Not familiar with this course.

    Have fun.
  7. Just do Q-Ride, get taught the basics + important roadcraft and get your license once it's all done.

    Saves the hassle of having a rider with at least a year of opens accompany you all the time if you choose not to do Q-Ride, makes it easier to get "experience" on the road if you're able to do it on your own.
  8. I used Q-Ride to get my licence (open). I had been away from bikes for a few years and it was perfect to get back into it. The course really assumes that you can stay upright and can actually "ride" as in move the bike without falling over. It teaches road position, braking, defensive riding brushing up on your road rules, basic maint, bike handling tricks etc. You can go from L to open in a single day if you are already comfortable on a bike and the instructor agrees. I did.

    It's a great day out and you will learn things.