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Learners experienc

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by jimmythehuman, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. Nope, not at all. I ddidnt even do a learners course just the license and i now realise 2 things. the preperation isnt enough. and the restricted power rule is a good idea.

    See in Sat paper P plates for cars is now going to be 4 years, each year a diffferent level of restriction. eg P1, P2, P3, P4.



    I think its all a good idea, there should be some compulsory training for bike riders.
     
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  2. I agree Jimmy, my licence test (ahem) a few years ago was at the local cop shop & consisted of being able to do a u-turn with my feet up on the pegs. Structures traing courses in those days weren't widely available.

    Now coming back to riding after a long absence I gained heaps from doing a basic course, mainly getting my head back around it all. Road/track experience under the eye of an instructor, at traffic speed, is all good & teaches skills & (hopefully) attitudes that save lives.
     
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  3. Q-Ride (in QLD) seems to be a fairly good system. You get trained on the required skills (including defensive riding techniques), and only pass once you demonstrate you can do them. I think some instructors don't do it as well as others, but that's to be expected.

    Phil
     
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  4. If your mate went straight from a learners course onto a 100km freeway, then he was a nut. Usual course of events is:

    1. Do learners course
    2. Find and buy a suitable bike (within legal L requirements)
    3. Get the bike delivered to you at home
    4. Start by riding around your home (I started by going around the undercover carpark)
    5. Once you feel comfortable with things, then go around the block (doing left hand turns only)
    6. Then when more confident, go around your local streets doing left and right turns, etc
    7. Then when more confident get into some slightly heavy traffic, etc

    For someone to jump straight onto a highway is sheer madness. When I first got my learners and 250, going at 40km seemed like 100km in a car. There was quite a bit of local practice before I felt confident enough to get out on a road with a bit of traffic, and even longer before I worked up to getting out on a freeway.

    bakz
     
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  5. I must be mad then
     
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  6. No harm at all in hopping onto a freeway. Most times (peak times excluded) a freeway will be easier than mixing it up with lots of traffic at intersections.

    And there is no "usual course of events" as Bakz claims.

    It all depends on what the individual learner feels confident in tackling. There's no right or wrong. A very timid new rider may benefit from a step-by-step approach such as the one Bakz suggests (my wife for one was very timid and did pretty much that list), but there's no reason why a learner should worry about hopping on a freeway if they feel up to it.

    Just because Bakz was a timid learner, doesn't mean that anyone who new learner that hops on a freeway is a nutcase.

    To each their own.
     
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  7. I don't think the training was good enough for ME to get a bike from the shop and ride in 60km main roads ,and i have had my licence 20 years and a drive a semi trailer as well ,hate to see a never before road user on the first day on the road and a bike.
    Lets face it, you get a bike and 2 minutes on a main road someone brakes hard your goooon ,and your hurt or worse.

    But on the way i did it, 100% the same as above it was OK ,but i still think 2 full days and a ride on the main road with the instuctor ,like the P's test day ,would be much safer and better.
    All up on the N.S.W .. L's test 6 hrs total ,i would say your rideing the bike ,all of 1.5 hrs at 0km - 20km.
    Do it as bakz said, and it's safer ,but i think more training would be better before you get your L's in N.S.W ,not sure on other states training tests.
    """Biggest tip""" was ,get the bike delivered or a mate to pick it up or ride it to your house.
    My 1.c worth.
    Cheers Sled.
     
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  8. I jsut went rhough the Qride system in QLD, and found it ok. having never riden a bike of any kind, that was the hardest part, as the road stuff was pretty easy (eg been driving for 6+yrs). In out test we included about 30km of freeway riding (well 90km/hr motorway). But as the instructor said, its no lisence to say you can ride, its more a lisence to learn, eg spend the next 5 yrs developing your skills. I feel, in qld it would be better to do Qride, get a bike (any size bike) and then after 12 months do a more advanceed course. That said i had no problem getting on a brnad new bike after only having it for a day (and 2 days or qride) and riding it down to northern NSW and back.
     
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  9. Just had a thought (and yes it hurt).

    I made my earlier post from a Victorian point of view, where our learners are permitted to travel at the posted speed limit.

    Some states have the rediculous law that restricts learners to 80 km/h.

    In those states, travelling on a freeway would be more hazardous, as you then throw into the mix a significant speed differential (considering most people drive well over 100 km/h on freeways.)
     
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  10. I thought the training system was the same everywhere. Here we have to:
    Pay our money and do 2x4Hour sessions with ridersafe to get our learners
    Stay on our learners for a reccomended 4months+
    Do the advanced 4hr course to move onto P's

    ohh and we have the 80km/h restriction. It is kinda lame being the only sensible way to get from my place to town. You can take longer back routes but really i shouldn't have to. If i want to go on the freeway i have to go into the far left lane and be scared shitless im going to be wedged between two trucks.
     
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  11. I got my bike learners license on my brothers VT250... I had never ridden a bike before...

    Then, 3 months later I went out and bought my first (proper) bike... (It was a Suzuki GF250SS) and rode it home from the shop.... Nearly crashed it at the first set of lights because I was ONLY using the back brake... Nearly crashed it 5 times on the way home....
     
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  12. nah, it differs from state to state. in vic theres no 2x 4hr sessions,
    min 3mths on learners & speed restriction is what ever the limit is
    for the road ya travelling on
     
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  13. All it takes is some common sense. If you dont have the experience, start off slowly.

    Does the government have to have courses in that also? :roll: The "L" test is simply to see if you have the basic requirements to handle a bike, it is then up to you to go out and teach yourself to ride by building your experience at your pace.
     
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  14. A big difference is going to be whether a learner has any experience on the roads before at all (ie car licence). Obviously driving experience isn't really going to help much with learning how to ride but there's going to be a big difference between a learner rider that's been driving for many years and therefore knows how traffic "works" and someone that's trying to learn to ride AND deal with traffic at the same time (incidentally my first ride was bringing the bike home, on the highway, in a thunderstorm solely because I had no other option).
     
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  15. Re: Riders Experience

    Methinks you're getting confused.

    Firstly, the MRA have no real say in the road rules. They make their voice heard if they disagree with soemthing, but whether that's listened to or not is a completely dfferent matter.

    Secondly, Vicroads look after Victorian roads and rules only, and we don't have the silly 80 km/h law for learners. That's in NSW and Qld I believe (The RTA look after NSW, do they also do Qld?)

    Thirdly, it as I not Kisy who said it was rediculous. :cool:
     
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  16. Re: Riders Experience

    Methinks you're getting confused.

    Firstly, the MRA have no real say in the road rules. They make their voice heard if they disagree with soemthing, but whether that's listened to or not is a completely dfferent matter.

    Secondly, Vicroads look after Victorian roads and rules only, and we don't have the silly 80 km/h law for learners. That's in NSW and Qld I believe (The RTA look after NSW, do they also do Qld?)

    Thirdly it was I, not Kishy, who said it was rediculous. :cool:
     
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  17. :LOL:

    Thanx Dale..

    Ninja confusing me with someone else i think :p
     
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  18. Damn!! I was sure I only hit the submit button once.
     
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  19. Re: Riders Experience

     
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  20. Re: Riders Experience

     
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