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Laser Eye Surgery: Blended Vision

Discussion in 'The Pub' at netrider.net.au started by OzYoda, Apr 5, 2011.

  1. I can only find one other thread on Laser Eye Surgery but not on this particular aspect so ..

    I am shortsighted with a bit of astigmatism thrown in. On the bike I have to wear glasses but that also makes it difficult to see the instruments well.

    It seems I'm an ideal candidate for Laser Eye Surgery but they suggest I go with blended vision. They only laser one eye: the dominant eye (my right). It gives one eye that focuses well at distance and one eye that does shortrange. Sounded strange.

    They had me go for a walk with a contact only in my right eye to see how it would be and I was actually impressed. Distance was very slightly less focussed than with glasses but then the std contact couldnt correct for the astigmatism that the surgery will. Reading was OK. I was concerned that my ability to estimate distance would be affected but was re-assured that it would be fine and seemed to be so on that little trial. They did say that it could take a couple of weeks to get fully used to it but the brain was perfectly capable of adjusting to it.



    A couple of days later I tried taking out the left lense from my glasses for most of a day. That was interesting and resulted in my eyes feeling like they wanted to tear up at times but as there was no sign of tearig I suspect it was a focussing anomaly. Apart from that my sight did seem pretty good overall.

    Has anyone got blended vision? Whats your experience?
     
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  2. I'm not ophthalmically trained, but at work I sit next to some guys who are. I'll ask the question for you when they get back.

    This much I do know - that your age will affect the answer; and that a difference of up to 1 dioptre between left and right eye is often considered the perfect result. By that I mean that your distance vision is perfect in one eye and the other just a little bit short sighted.

    I had Lasik over 12 years ago, and one eye was slightly short sighted afterwards. No problems.

    Your age affects the answer because most people have a measurable (and quick) change in their vision some time between their early and late 40s. Towards long-sightedness and away from short-sightedness. This then progresses more slowly for the rest of your life. This is often taken into account in calculating the correction needed.

    I'm guessing that you wouldn't be considering surgery if your error is 1 diopte or less, so I'll have to find out what the experts say.
     
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  3. I too am short sighted with astigmatism and wear glasses all the time but I have no problems with reading the instruments, providing my glasses are on properly.

    Make sure you've got the right prescription.

    I have a new problem. For the last 20+ years I could wear my glasses and still read a book/map/text message, but in the last 6 months or so I'm finding that I have to take my glasses of to read. This must be what my optometrist was talking about 12 months ago when he said "Next time you get your eyes checked we'll check for reading as well.....you're 45 so you'll probably need reading glasses as well in a year or 2".
     
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  4. I had to look twice to make sure it wasn't me that typed the messge above. I'm in exactly the same position as b12mick - six months ago I gave in and started to wear multifocals. I must be middle aged. Odd - it doesn't feel it.
     
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  5. Okay, here the feedback I got:

    "That solution - monocularity - is never going to provide great binocular vision but some people adapt to it much better than others. It's an option for those with poor long AND short refraction. It needs to be trialled with contact lenses for a while before surgery. I would try and avoid it for people well under 40, but it's not a bad option as you get older."

    So it seems that it's not that unusual. If the trial works out for you, it may be okay. If not, you will eventually be stuck with glasses or contacts for either distance or reading. So I'm told.

    Simon and Mick - you're the same as everyone else, and right on schedule.
     
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  6. I'm short sighted with astigmatism and wear contact lenses when I'm on the bike.

    One contact incorrectly rotated (or wearing only one contact...d'oh) - drives me insane.
     
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  7. I'm not sure if that makes me feel any better or not....

    Simon, how do you find the multifocals? My wife had them and didn't like them when riding or driving. She's gone back to having two pairs, one for reading and one for everything else.
     
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  8. Thanks Titus.

    Yeah, I'm in the "definitely" over 40 bracket and my vision is stable. Glasses for long distance but read OK without glasses. Put glasses on and can see long distance but cant read at all. Guess Bifocals would fix that (flat glass at the bottom I suppose) but I would like to get rid of glasses altogether... they are such a hassle.

    They'll leave me one eye as is for reading and fix the other for distance. It seemed pretty good on my short trial with one contact though I'm understandably feeling a bit cautious about my vision.

    Love to hear from anyone who has had it done about how long it took them to adapt.

    cheers
     
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  9. Thanks for the comment Luke.

    I could never wear contacts as I couldnt get them in! Darn things just went inside out on me all the time. Even the expert putting the one in for my trial had half a dozen attempts to get it in. I dont think my eyes like contacts :D

    I will be continuing to wear my glasses with the left side out more. Hate to have this done and find I cant get used to it.
     
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  10. You'll get to trial it yourself anyway, in that case. Normal practise is to do one eye and let that settle before doing the second. If it really drives you crazy you can have one eye corrected by glasses or contact lens until they decide what to do with the second.
     
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  11. why don't you just get dual-zone glasses??
     
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  12. I have had laser eye surgrey about 5 years ago. I was short sighted, so fixed up needing to wear glasses to see distance.

    I heard about how you can get done what you are suggesting. From what I understand you do need to trial this via contacts or glasses for a while. Some people get headaches, can't handle the one eye for reading, one for long distance.

    Age is definitely a factor, and to be honest I have probably gone a little bit early for the surgery. My eyes have gone backwards a little. I still don't need glasses, but the vision at night isn't as strong as it was straight after surgery. Not sure my eyes were as stable as they should have been. I will one day need reading glasses, like most people this is just a part of ageing.

    The surgery it self is pretty safe, and they will only do it if they believe they have a high likelyhood of success, otherwise they will knock you back because it affects there stats.
     
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  13. Or a monocle if you want to further your reputation for aristocratic eccentricity :D.
     
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  14. I use to wear glasses to correct medium-severe short sightedness and a mild astigmatism. I had IntraLase LASIK six months ago when I turned 27. Cost me $5300 all up. Recovery time less than 24 hours. Result was near 20/20 vision (as good as I could get with glasses), minimal side effects (dry eyes after a day on a motorcycle, alleviated by artificial tears from Priceline), and a significant increase in my ability to ride a motorcycle (see further / clearer / quicker, got my peripheral vision back).

    My mother is 30 years older than I am, she initially had PRK LASIK to correct short-sightedness, and later Multi-Focal Intra-Ocular Lens replacement, because her natural lenses developed cataracts. She has better than 20/20 vision. She does however have greater side effects than I do, namely glare during the day and halos around lights at night.
     
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  15. Thanks. Nice to hear sucess stories guys. I take it that if you had both eyes done then you now have to wear reading glasses (its what I was advised .. they can fix the eyes to see distance OR short)?
     
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  16. I loathe them. Worst of all possible worlds. Next time I have an eye test I'm changing to two pairs. I wish I was brave enough even to consider laser surgery but the thought of it going wrong leaves me shivering
     
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  17. Safe, yes (at least in Australia - not so sure about cheap deals in Asia).
    However, I can tell you that there is one organisation in town that doesn't knock back anyone, no matter how poor their chances of success may be.
    Bet you've heard of them, too.

    Multifocal specs - ask them if they use Pentax lenses, and if they do, ask for something else or go elsewhere. Poor quality, lots of aberration.
     
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  18. I'm 27, and haven't become long sighted yet.

    My mother is 57, and has multi-focal lenses which *replaced* the natural lenses in her eyes, and she can see all distances with either/both eyes without glasses. Clearly there's a higher risk level for invasive surgery that permanently removes your natural lenses, but my mother was getting cataracts in her natural lenses so they were becoming useless anyway.

    If you're a middle-aged bloke with an active lifestyle, the surgeon will not advise lens replacement surgery, because you're too young for that level of risk. It's a shame, because in fifty years time with superior surgery technology and lens manufacturing, all they'll probably do is lens replacement surgery.

    IntraLase LASIK on the other hand is relatively low risk. Nearly the entire procedure (laser time less than a few minutes, theatre time about fifteen minutes) is performed by a computerised laser machine. The laser creates a flap, the surgeon carefully peels it back, the laser burns on the prescription, the surgeon retracts the flap, next eye.

    If you have both eyes corrected for short-sightedness and astigmatism like me, you will still need reading glasses. If you have one eye corrected, and are not happy with the results, you can always go ahead and have the other eye corrected.

    But to save yourself some time and money, I would take your full prescription to your local optometrist, and ask to trial *toric* contact lenses. These are soft disposable contact lenses with correct for astigmatism as well as short-sightedness. Ride your motorcycle through the twisties wearing one in your right eye and see what you think.
     
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  19. I cannot wait to see about getting something done to my eyes... I'm long sighted in my left eye and short in my right, with astigmatism in both eyes. On top of that I have a squint in both my eyes that is out horizontally and vertically so I see double and the double has a height difference...

    It's fun! But also annoying lol. Waiting to have my squint corrected before I can get anything else done :(

    I do get fed up of wearing glasses. They're just annoying most of the time, and I have such a knack of falling asleep with them on still and breaking them they always cost me a fortune too lol
     
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  20. I really want to get laser eye surgery done as my eyes are at a -6.25 rating and still getting worse :( can't wait to have 12 - 18 without change in eye sight to be able to get it done.
     
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