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VIC LAMS Bikes query?

Discussion in 'Politics, Laws, Government & Insurance' at netrider.net.au started by caferacer600, Jan 6, 2013.

  1. Just wondering if anyone knows of a way to get a bike recognised as an "approved motorcycle" that is not on the vicroads list?
    The bike in question is an 89 CBR400RR grey import. It is australian compliant and has a power to weight which is below the cut off for an approved bike. It is very similar to the RVF 400, and the engine is the same as that of a CB400, both of which are on the list?


     
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  2. Interesting. It just scrapes in if you round down. You add 90 kg to the tare weight. A few bikes seem to scrape in when rounded down.
    I'd say the best way to find out about this is to contact Vicroads directly.
    There is at least one bike I'd think *should* be on the list (a W650) and isn't. It's ok for power to weight but is over on cc being 676.

    btw: Welcome to the forums. It's suggested to post an intro in the "Welcome Lounge and Birthday Greetings" forum as your first post.
     
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  3. I wouldnt be surprised if it shows up as LAMS a bike when they do a rego search on the rego scanners then have now days. Im just guessing but its not far fetched with the technology the cops have now days.
     
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  4. ...and if the capacity was to be upped to get the W650 in, how long do you think it would take for Triumph to add "bolted on" wee lead panniers to a Street Triple? :)
     
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  5. They'd have to be welded on and be bloody heavy.
     
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  6. In Queensland you need a dyno chart for the specific bike signed by an engineer (authorised - probably). Alternatively they will take an original manual of specifications from the manufacturer as proof - I think they then need an 'unmodified' certification from an engineer.

    Victoria seems similar. See this FAQ (#15) on VicRoads (http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/NR/r...F6-9677-C276A83947BD/0/LAMSQandAsJuly2008.pdf):


     
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  7. They would, indeed, need to be pretty heavy! :)

    If I wasn't busy drinking beer, I'd work out how heavy they'd need to be. (y)

    As for the welding...... dunno.

    I know that when Q,land adopted the LAMS business, they threw out a few bikes that were too easy to derestrict.

    Lost interest when Vic bought into it.

    The bike that surprises me is the CB400 Honda.

    I'd really find it hard to believe that, by buying parts from Japan's large after market business, one couldn't get a really nice, light weight 400 cc motorbike that went quite acceptably well.

    My experience with my Honda was that you could buy light weight almost anything for it. Wheels, swingarms, sprockets, shocks, forks...etc. and how, exactly, the registration authorities were supposed to keep track of this, "shrug" I dunno.
     
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  8. The reason why I say they'd need to be welded is so that VicRoads could live in belief that it couldn't be 'de-restricted'.
     
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  9. If Power/Weight is ok then what's your problem?
    Personally, I'd limit it to Power AND Power/Weight but you'd probably find something negative to say about that too.
     
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  10. I don't have a great problem with LAMS bikes, but, tbh I was quite happy with the old 250 rule, too.

    At heart, I'm not even sure that I'm that bothered if we went back to the bad old days when a learner could ride whatever they could lay their hands on.

    Making rules, any rules, will always result in the borderline cases.

    I totally agree that a W650 would be a good learner bike, IMHO a far better learner bike than an RVF400, but the rules say that it isn't.

    Back when the LAMS thing was originally being discussed in NSW, I, and others, were under the impression that it wasn't to be simply a power to weight ratio, but also individual models were to be considered on a case by case basis for inclusion.

    That, as it turns out, was too hard.
     
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