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insuring bikes you can't ride

Discussion in 'Businesses and Service Providers' at netrider.net.au started by edgelett, Feb 17, 2006.

  1. hey all,



    99% chance I'll be buying a bike tomorrow I can't ride legally for a while. Till my r-date comes around, i'll be re-painting/customising it. It will be kept in a shed in our back yard, with an alarm on the bike, alarm on the shed, and a german shepherd & rhodesian ridgeback between the fence & the shed. however I want to make sure it's insured against theft. I also still have the two fiddy so I'll be paying rego & insurance on that, & don't want to spend too much.

    can anyone recommend an insurance company that is a) cheap and b) will allow me to insure a bike I can't legally ride??
     
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  2. Try swan.

    I don't think there will be any issue about you being able to ride it, not if it's stolen anyway.
     
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  3. I know shannons will insure cars for that sort of thing, eg track cars, cars being restored etc. And as they do bike's now might be an option.
     
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  4. I had exactly the same problem and could not get the insurers to act the least bit interested.

    My situation was/is having the CB250 (Victoria) already insured through QBE (and being mature age with no 'blemishes' etc. etc.) and I purchased my 'big' bike in advance of full unrestricted licence as many people will do.

    Because I was not 'licenced' to ride the over capacity bike they simply said they could not help me until I was fully licenced. I don't have a Ridgeback (maybe a female Beagle with clean shiny teeth!!) but I have all security etc. but still no luck. They said they understood but 'sorry'.

    This is quite frustrating.
     
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  5. Same here ... Got my trumpy while on restrictions, but i did manage to insure it through Swann under my name as long as I put down "another" fully licensed rider as 100% usage. Once off restrictions ... just called them up and put myself down as primary rider ... easy :grin:
     
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  6. I'm not sure, but surely you could insure the bike just for fire and theft? Sorry that I'm not any help :?
     
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  7. insurance companies dont seem to ask whether you are allowed to ride it or not, i'd say no problem at all
     
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  8. They will when/if you put in a claim.
     
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  9. Sure fire & Theft maybe through a different insurer and policy but not so forthcoming from the traditional bike insurers.


    And.....................

    (You have hit a nerve with me on this subject)


    Another example of this 'chicken and the egg' scenario is in rerspect of training circuits. You buy the 'big' bike and want to have some training/experience before you get on the road but guess what....... they can't have you on their training tracks because you don't have the full licence and their insurance will not cover you. (A 250 is OK though) . At least I can go to Broadford and try out at 180 kmph, but it is effectively a race track.

    I am sure their is logic to this insurance scenario but it makes no sence.

    Again, frustrating to the developing bike rider.
     
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  10. Surely only if you were riding it at the time something happened to it...
     
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  11. Bix, you are correct Shannons do offer "lay up" forms of insurance for bikes. We have our three Dukes insured under the one policy, two for road use and one for lay up (it needs a total rebuild - $$$$$, a new big end is the least of our problems). However the lay up insurance amount is the same as extreme limited use - 2,000kms worth of riding per year, which we had on it before it decided to die - it was red plated so could only be ridden on special occasions and for testing.

    The difference between our situation and Edgelett's is that if the bike were rideable - either of us can ride it - we are both licensed to do so.

    However, Edgelett it might be worth to ring Shannons and ask them.
     
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  12. there was about 5 pages on this just recently
     
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  13. from what i've heard, that depends on if you're suspicious enough for them to check your licence :p
     
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  14. thanks for all the reposonses guys - if I get the bike tomorrow I'll all both shannons & swann and see what happens.

    my BF has his full licence so i can put him down i guess...but since I'll be customising it over the next 12 months all I need is theft insurance really.

    I'll let you know what happens anyway!
     
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  15. Just an idea... but..

    Why not spend about 15% of the cash you'll spend on insurance on some good quality chains, locks, alarms etc.

    I've got a device dynabolted to my concrete garage floor with my bike chained to that from two different points. That sucker ain't going anywhere fast...

    At least till you'll be riding the bike full-time, then chase up the insurance...... You can always still use the security you invested in earlier as backup once the bike is being ridden full-time.

    This is what I did.

    also,

    I find that not "annoucing" the bike to the neighbourhood is another good way to keep it safe. eg, I'll wash my bike in the backyard as opposed to the front yard, so not to be visible to everyone driving past. A few little commonsense things like this can go a long way to protecting our pride and joy's!

    Just my 2cents worth.
     
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