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how to push start a bike?

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by adnan12, Dec 11, 2005.

  1. Just wondering is this how to push start a bike?

    http://motorcycles.about.com/cs/maintenance/a/jump.htm

    It's somewhere in the middle of the website. I've never push started a bike before :oops:


     
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  2. would work, i always go for first gear though.
     
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  3. i usually get my speed to 20kmph in neutral then shift second and slowly release clutch.

    if the bike hasn't been running prior to the dead battery then use some throttle. make sure your going in a straight line ! :D
     
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  4. Yeah I have had to push start my bike. I start in neutral and shift into gear with a bit of speed up. The slowly release the clutch.....
     
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  5. 2nd gear is the conventional wisdom, as soon as the engine fires pull in the clutch and try to get the revs up and get the engine running cleanly before attempting to ride off..
     
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  6. I usually put them in 2nd or 3rd depending on compression, hold the clutch running beside it for a few steps then let the clutch out as I swing my leg over the seat. Give it a bit of throttle and you'll have it going.

    Note- Make sure your igition and kill switch are in the ON position.
     
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  7. I have found out that it is impossible to push start a bike with an engine immobilizer :eek:
     
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  9. I had an old GPX250 and to push start it you had to make sure that you had the starter button pushed in. Without it the engine would turn over but not fire, even with the ignition on.
     
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  10. Hmmm. I'd be asking for a pull start.


    OK. Push start. the technique depends on the bike and whether your doing this alone or with help. It also depends on your electrical system. On some, if the battery is flat you're pharqued because the electricery relies on some current to even think about starting.

    On a 4-cylinder machine put it in 2nd or 3rd, run alongside and, when you're going as fast as you can get your left foot on the peg and, as you drop the clutch, swing the right leg over and THUMP your weight onto the seat. (Be sure the fuel, ignition and kill switch are "ON" before starting your run.

    On a twin or single (field of expertise, so if you disbelieve anything else I write, trust this bit) the technique is the same BUT...before you start running, put it in gear and walk backwards until the bike resists. You're now at top-dead-centre on the compression stroke and you have 2 full revolutions to get up speed before the next compression stroke. Yes, I know - you've got the clutch held in so, in theory, it shouldn't matter - nevertheless, on a high-compression motor this makes a big difference.
     
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  11. I always found the advice of "Run along side the bike" a bit suspect.

    I've tried this and, if you're on a slight slope the bike just gets faster and faster...

    Once the bike is going as fast as you can run, its pretty much impossible to jump on the thing.

    I found it's not hard to get the bike going fast enough if you just get in the saddle, stand up, and push the bike from there. Helps if you're tall and on a slope though. You don't look too cool doing it, but I feel a lot safer when I'm on my moving bike not having it run away from me.[/b]
     
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  12. midnight, that guy will never get it started when he's facing the wrong way..;-)
     
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  13. I've had to do it twice (ahh...the joys of a completely fubar CB250) and the trick I learned after nearly ending up under the bike the first time is to not run flat out. Go a little faster then a jog and then start sprinting just before you throw a leg over, clutch out gently until it fires, clutch in hard and give it some throttle and hopefully it will still be ticking over.
     
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  14. I've had to do it twice (ahh...the joys of a completely fubar CB250) and the trick I learned after nearly ending up under the bike the first time is to not run flat out. Go a little faster then a jog and then start sprinting just before you throw a leg over, clutch out gently until it fires, clutch in hard and give it some throttle and hopefully it will still be ticking over.
     
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  15. Thanks 4 everyones help and especially you midnight :LOL:
     
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