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how do ya run in a horny????

Discussion in 'Bling and Appearance' at netrider.net.au started by jeffatav, Aug 18, 2007.

  1. Hi all, I have just put a deposit down on a new CB900 hornet and will pick it up this week.

    What is the opinions of what oil to use and running in procedures???



    Some use mineral oils for the first 1000km and then swap to synthetics (and others would use cooking oil, they are so slack :LOL: )

    What is the recommended running in procedures?? I have heard that you should vary the rpm's but don't redline her until later etc etc.

    I want to treat this new girl well and give her a long life. :cool:

    thanks

    Jeff
     
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  2. Do a few searches Jeff, there are so many opinions.. Personally I would follow the user guide, us engineers generally put stuff in them for a good reason. I agree not to sit on one speed for long periods and dont red line regularly. I heard you should do some near full throttle bursts (not to red line), I hear this helps bed the rings.. But dont quote me on that.
    K
     
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  3. You run it in by bringing it to the next northern meet :LOL:
     
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  4. I've read all sorts of arguments on this, yet to see conclusive arguments.

    Some mates have run brand new bikes in at the track (original oil), others have babied them for thousands of km's. I have no doubt that the harder you run them in the more power the engine will make once settled.

    I really don't think it makes a difference either way honestly, unless you try to get 200,000 km's out of the engine.
     
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  5. im confused jeff, you're 'sposed to switch to a cruiser when you have your mid-life crisis, not from a cruiser :p :p :p

    excellent choice though!!
     
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  6. Are you getting the new orange one?
     
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  7. Sweet.

    The trend for manufactures advising how bikes should be run in is generally changing.

    The basic outline is ride it normally - ie
    + dont go too high, but no need to go too low. Just ride like normal.
    + don't keep it at a constant rpm for too long (don't go on the freeway for too long for a while)
    + dont nancy it as soon as you get it, go through the gears, use engine braking, rinse and repeat. And change oil and filter after 80kms
     
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  8. OHhhhhhh................I stuffed up again :LOL:

    I plan to keep all three bikes,but we'll see what happens.

    The wife doesn't know yet and won't until she sees it sitting in the garage and then it's too late :LOL: :LOL:

    She says all bike look the same anyway, so I might just hide the cruiser under a cover and see how long it takes her for the penny to drop.

    Did that last time when I bought the cruiser and everyone at work and around home were in on it in a sweep with a case as the prize for the closest guess (1 week was the winner)

    Nah, I am getting homosexual candy red :LOL: :LOL:

    It's a good looking red and will go with my handbags and stillettos :LOL:

    Jeff
     
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  9. I am going to raise the motion at sydnorbs that Jeff the cross dressing homo builder is made our official mascot..
    K
     
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  10. Baha.

    I second the motion!
     
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  11. Ask the shop and read this...

    http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

    Then make your own mind up

    If you get the time, at least do an oil change at 500kms - again ask the shop what type of oil.

    And congrats, hope you at least rode a few to compare :wink:
     
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  12. Thanks Alex.

    Hmmm..........run it hard for the first 20km :shock: :shock:

    That article goes against most theories of running it in gently and as it says, is controvesial!!

    I can understand what they are saying with improved manufacturing and metal qualities and tolerances compared to yesteryears.

    I will be changing oil and filter to a petroleum oil after about 100km, but the method of running it in hard does "scare" me a bit.

    Has anyone here used the method in this article?????

    Jeff
     
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  13. Run in advice IS changing, but something to remember is that so are the manufacturing techniques.
    I read with great interest( and a little disbelief) that Kawasaki is going back to hard chromed aluminium cylinder walls on the new Z 1000 and 750. These engines will have a radically different requirement for running in than a conventional cast iron cylinder liner, as hard chroming takes a long time to bed in nicely, and is very tolerant of abuse as well, so ham fisted riders may not be able to damage these bores full stop. Whereas cast iron being softer, needs a mroe gentle run in procedure, and is also a material that "holds on to" oil a lot better.
    I do hope though, that Kawasaki bore the horrible lessons of history in mind when selecting chromed bores, they were woeful when introduced 25 years ago........
    Franky, I dont see any valid reason to change oil and filter at 80 kms, as run in wear is still considerable and definitely NOT finished at this time. It certainly hasn't harmed millions of engines leaving the oil in till 1000kms.....

    Regards, (cast iron all the way) Andrew.
     
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  14. I found this in Dans Motorcyle Repair Course
    QUOTE
    Any rebuilt or new engine has to go through a break in process. Each piece of moving metal must get to know and fit with the piece of metal it is moving against. Usually, the manufacturers put a sticker on the speedometer or tachometer telling you to take it easy for 600 miles or so. Your buddy says "If you want to run it hard, break it in hard." As you might expect, the truth is not on the right hand or the left but, in the center.

    The problem is this. All this rubbing produces heat, which can cause oil to fail, which can cause a piston to seize to a cylinder wall. On the other hand, if there is not enough rubbing, the piston rings will not seat right with the cylinder walls. If this happens the engine will not reach it's full power potential. If the only new parts are piston and rings, as in an engine rebuild, we only have to worry about heat build up from the new parts. If the entire engine is new, the heat built up is even greater, because all the parts are new.

    Yes, it is true that we have much better machining and quality control on new motorcycle engines, then we did in the past but, moving parts still have to wear in. If you have better, harder metal, it will take longer then if you have poorer, softer metal. Years ago I decided to bore my BMW motorcycle to the first oversize. After a hundred miles of break-in I started to ride normally, which is to say FAST ! Well, the bike just was not running right. I re-jetted the carb and it started to run OK. Another hundred miles passed and I had to rejet again. This went on for over one thousand miles. After the last re-jetting I realized I had just put the stock jets back in ! It took better then 1100 miles for those rings to break-in. The steel used in BMW motorcycles is very hard !

    On one hand, if you run the bike too easy, you run the risk of the cylinder walls glazing over and then, maybe, never seating properly. On the other hand, if you run the bike too hard, you run the risk of engine seizure. I suspect, that even if you do glaze the cylinder walls over, if your run the engine hard enough and long enough, the rings will seat. However, this may take a thousand miles, or more, to do.

    So what's a biker to do ? Well, a compromise is in order. This is what I do with a freshly rebuilt engine. It will work on new engines too. On a straight, deserted road, I put the bike in second or third gear and accelerate with wide open throttle to about one or two thousand RPM BELOW red line. I then shut the throttle and coast down, in gear, to two thousand RPM or so. I then do it again. I do this about ten times. Then I ride around for a while at an easy pace. I do this several times, if possible. This seats the rings without overheating the engine.

    I would continue to do this during the entire break-in period. If you are doing any freeway riding. That is, running long periods of time at a steady throttle setting. I would also add this. Shut the throttle off and then on again, very quickly, every three or four miles. This tends to draw more oil up on the bottom of the pistons, lubing and cooling them. On a freshly rebuilt engine, I like to change the oil and filter at about two hundred miles and then every thousand miles thereafter. On a totally new engine, I change the oil and filter at one hundred fifty miles, three hundred miles, six hundred miles and twelve hundred miles. After that, change the oil and filter every one thousand miles.
    END QUOTE

    It is starting to look like a combination of hard/gentle and with very regular oil changing.

    What is the best petroleum based oil??? (I use synthetic usually and have for a while now!)

    Jeff
     
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  15. Modern engines can take some punishment during break in. Ever hear of anyone having problems who bought an ex demo (car or bike)? Nah, because they get flogged from the first km and get regularly serviced.

    No offence to any of our learned netriders, but just ask the bloody shop Jeff. Ring up tomorrow and speak to the service manager, he is going to be up-to-date with the latest and greatest. This is what I call the whole buying experience, buy the oil and filter from them, tell them what you plan on doing and hopefully they are as excited as you are.

    Someone posts up some information contrary to a place that prep and sell a few bikes each week (not too mention carry out any warranty work) - who are you going to listen to?
     
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  16. Yeah keep em all...I did :grin: boy with the most toys wins :biker: :cool:
     
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  17. A friend who works at PS assembly tells me that all the engines have been run in even BEFORE they are fully assembled (in the bike). So that is before the test rider takes it out and fangs it to make sure all is well. Yes, it is rider now not riders due to some naughty people hahaha
    I think the best thing to do is ride it as you always would, but don't try to race anyone from the lights for a couple hundred k's. You don't wanna fcuk your brand new gearbox/clutch etc moreso then your engine.
     
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  18. Did an oil and filter change at 180KM........................and I was shocked to see how black and full of sh1t it was!!!!! They must have also done up the oil filter with an air ratchet tool...................NEVER had a tighter filter!!! The thought cross my mind about left handed thread, restraining clip??????? In the end I put on the filter tool (steel banded) on and over tightened with a pair of vice grips (all at 12.oopm last night after a night out and still in my going out clothes and the loyal wife watching from the back of her car :LOL: :LOL: )

    Plan to do the next at 500KM and then it can go for its 1000km warranty service.

    Lesson here.....................change a new bikes' oil and filter as early as possible!!!!!!!

    Jeff
     
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  19. So the lotal wife is taking it pretty well, must be the trip you are sending her on. Smart move IMHO.
    K
     
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  20. Changed my oil on the 675 after 35kms. It was already starting to go black, and had a few little metal pieces in it. Changed it again at around 500kms and it looked about the same as it did at 35kms, but with only three very tiny metallic fragments.

    i.e. The first 30-40kms wears your engine in just as much as the next 300-400kms will do.

    I never ran it really hard, nor did I baby it. I just rode it like normal, doing 1/2 throttle runs up to 1/2 rpm, and braking hard again (leaving the clutch out to put maximum back pressure on the engine) for the first 30kms. From 30-500kms it was basically 2/3's throttle to 2/3rd's peak rpm, braking occasionally, and from 500-1000kms I did 3/4's throttle to 3/4's peak rpm. After that, I just stopped worrying about it. They say to occasionally use full-throttle and up to full rpm in short-bursts between 1000-1500kms, which for me is just regular riding anyway. I think what they're more concerned about in the 1000-1500kms stage is sustained flat-out full-throttle high-speed runs, but how often does that happen anyway?
     
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