Welcome to Netrider ... Connecting Riders!

Interested in talking motorbikes with a terrific community of riders?
Signup (it's quick and free) to join the discussions and access the full suite of tools and information that Netrider has to offer.

Honda cbf250 questions

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by jimmyjames182, Jul 21, 2008.

  1. Nearly set on a honda cbf250 as my first bike.

    Can buy new in my budget, it's reliable and an 'easy' bike to learn on and I should be able to onsell in a few years when I figure out what my ideal bike will be.

    Considered the vtr250 and gs500 - both out of my budget and I don't feel confident buying 2nd hand.



    A few questions about the cbf250.

    Drive away price starts at 6k - what is a realistic price to bargain for?

    It has a warranty - do services need to be performed by a dealer during this period?

    Will it keep up with freeway traffic? Dealer says no problem but I'd like to hear it from an owner if possible.

    I don't want a performance machine, just something to get a few years riding experience on before I commit to a more advanced ride. What do people think?
     
     Top
  2. If your really looking to get a few years on it, I would be looking at a second hand VTR250 or GS as you said you liked.

    Why dont you want to buy second hand.

    In my opinion, you will grow bored with the CB very easily.
     
     Top
  3. i bought a cbf250 a couple of months ago. it's okay for city riding, but wouldn't say it's ok for freeway riding.

    if i had my time again, i'd probably go the vtr250.
     
     Top
  4. Ta for the replies.

    I guess I feel like a beginner and am not confident in judging a second hand bikes condition - feel like new will be a safe bet.

    VTR250 seems set up for someone wanting to head in the sports bike direction - I know that's not me.

    GS500 is more money than I want to spend new.

    However if the CBF250 can't travel 30 minutes in freeway traffic then it's not an option - I plan on the odd commute.

    Am I being unrealistic about the CBF250's capability?
     
     Top
  5. You should be able to pick up a low Km VTR250 for ~$5000. When i ride mine on the freeway it seems alright though i have a windscreen. Bought a 2002 model that only had 5800km on it for $4900.

    Some things you should factor in when barganing for a better price. How much rego it has left, if it doesn't have much left get them to know a bit off. Also the condition of its tyres, if they need replacing soon could maybe get them to knock a bit more off. Finally when was it last serviced, (if it was serviced regularly by a dealer it should be in great condition)

    When i bought mine it hadn't been serviced by the dealer in 3 years, but i bought it from a friend, and i know her husband is a bike fanatic, who changes fluids regularly in his own bike, and always did hers at the same time (and he rode about 10 times as many km's as her) so what that ment is that she got 4 oil changes in 5800km distance only thing i forgot to factor in at the time was that the tyres were 6 years old (due to the super low km's) and needed to be replaced due to age (cost about $330 for a brand spanka front and back.)
     
     Top
  6. {double post woops}
     
     Top
  7. A second hand VTR is a better buy than a new CBF. After riding a CBF a couple of times while having my VTR serviced I found out why they named it the CBF ..............Can't Be F^&*$d!

    The VTR isn't set up only for people looking to sportsbikes it is actually a great stepping stone to a whole range of bikes.

    The CBF will be ok on the freeway, but not as good as the VTR.

    If you want to keep this bike for a couple of years the CBF is the wrong bike to get because as others have said, you will tire of it very quickly.

    The VTR had enough in it to keep me interested in the 2 years before I upgraded.
     
     Top
  8. I got a 2nd cbf because it was cheap and it was a single (which suited me as I haven't ridden a motorbike before my L's) and I cannot wait to get off my p's so I can sell it.

    It goes and it is simple but it sits on 7k rpm @100kmh - there isn't much left and its buzzy.

    But for a cheap ride that you will only hang onto for ~15 months its hard to go past, but I wouldn't buy a new one.

    Really isn't that what you are after? I would not buy something that is going to lose value as you are not going to hang onto it. Do not buy new.
     
     Top
  9. Keep in mind your finances too - if you're only going to keep it a year or 2, you'll end up losing much more in depreciation than if you bought an older learner's bike second-hand and onsold it. How set-in-stone is your budget? It might be cheaper in the long-term to buy a GS500 and keep it than buy a CBF and sell it. I can't even afford a new CBF though, so I can't say I've done the maths very thoroughly on that.

    I can't speak from experience, but I've also been told that the VTR250 is still built in Japan, whereas the CBF250 is built somewhere else, so it probably isn't as great in terms of quality.
     
     Top
  10. brazil
     
     Top
  11. Ta for all replies - a rethink might be in order.

    Even the local bike shop sales guy suggested I go and find a 2nd hand gs500 so the cbf must be very limited.
     
     Top
  12. If you're going to buy a CBF250, you may as well buy a Yamaha Scorpio and save yourself another 2K.
     
     Top
  13. Well you could always look at 2nd hand examples ... :wink: (My GS is up for sale for under $3k, too bad you're in NSW).

    Still, if you keep a look-out, 1 will always pop out every now n then, esp as LAMS was introduced in NSW awhile now compared to VIC.

    Hmm, just re-read your post - you're looking at something NEW on a budget, are you? Well, if you plan to keep the CBF a coupla years, then go for it!
     
     Top
  14. Well you could always look at 2nd hand examples ... :wink: (My GS is up for sale for under $3k, too bad you're in NSW).

    Still, if you keep a look-out, 1 will always pop out every now n then, esp as LAMS was introduced in NSW awhile now compared to VIC.

    Hmm, just re-read your post - you're looking at something NEW on a budget, are you? Well, if you plan to keep the CBF a coupla years, then go for it!
     
     Top
  15. Problem solved - a cb250, pretty clean bike fell into my hands.

    Cheap, easy to learn on and in good order. Can't complain.

    Now - got to learn to ride the thing!
     
     Top
  16. any slow naked bike is great to learn on, the cb is one of the best of that bunch, you will pass easy on this bike, ive got an across, its handy and fast enogh for me but maybe not as reliable as the cb and not as easy to learn on as the cb either

    goodluck
     
     Top