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Giving disabled the freedom to ride

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' started by Gromit, May 8, 2009.

  1. Just as an FYI, guys:

    Giving disabled the freedom to ride.


  2. hi gromit,

    thanks for thinking about us and posting the link, but from what i can see it's a fairly flawed design in the real world.....i agree it would be prefect for the track and any prefect surface but the issue is roads aren't flat.....guess you probably haven't see the thread here, but we built a system for lenna it's just going through the approval stage atm, but yeah a few people thought it was going to be a system like the one pictured and all agree it's not suitable to road use, and after riding our setup i completely agree it's just not going to be stable with such a high cog once the rider is placed on the bike.....still it's amazing and i would love to see the cal's and forces they are using as i think i have over engineered mine by more then a few kgs :oops:

    The other issue i see with it, which we didn't want to run into was loosing ground clearance incase i ever wanted to take the sv out for a spin.....i didn't wanna be running out of clearance :wink:
  3. i just looked at your thread stewy, your and Lena's inspirational story should go to the broader media. :grin:
  4. Me thinks so too!!

    Onya Adam

  5. Hey Stew, would the MP3 400 have worked for Lenna? (I'm assuming that if it did, then cost or styling preference prohibited it?)

    In one of my jobs I work in academic disability support at a university, and a number of students who are mobile by means of wheelchair / scooter only have expressed desire to experience a bike, which in most cases would necessarily mean as a pillion (I intend to get a sidecar when my income is proportionate to my desire - a shame I don't have one now!), but for some in terms of riding, and I've wondered if the MP3 would work; and they're not that expensive comparatively...
  6. In my small home town of Murwillumbah I have seen a few times this guy who has a wheelchair.

    This guy inspires me because he also has a motorbike! (Trike?)

    Its a weird shape, it allows him to roll his chair up onto it where it must strap in some how. Its a trike shape and he just cruises around in it.

    Pretty awesome :) But yeah, if there were a way to allow disabled people to ride a conventional bike that would be awesome!
  7. Really i just want to get her all signed off first, but really most people have a some sort of inspirational story to tell, this one just interests other riders, but thanks for the kind words

    yes and no, that will really depend on the person and where their injury level is, with lenna her's is quite high, towards the top of the abs, so the mp3 she just sort of flops to one side, rocks on hips and abs (ie she can't hold her upper body position well) and the fact that in the scooter position her legs just fell to the side, where as on the bike, where she has a leg either side, it sort of located her upper body more (sorta hard to explain) but it sort of reinforces her to locate herself straight up and down.

    Someone with a very low injury at the bottom of abs it could very well work, though you still need to look at the legs falling out, though that would be fairly easy fix.

    The other issue was when i started it they only had a 250 version and couldn't tell me when the 500+ ones would be coming out......and i mean who wants to ride a 250 and you hold a unrestricted license :LOL:

    yes i looked into these, but they are quite rare and expense and underpowered again, as well but she didn't want to ride again unless you got the thrill and advantage of cornering that only bikes offer. The way they steer is a truly amazing thing and she wanted that.

    Since then i was speaking with a mate who was telling me about a sidecar/motorbike that was built (back in the 70's) in a trapezium shape and cornered and worked, steered like a motorcycle, but by this time i had already built the other system, and it was quite a complex system, a work of great engineering ability or so i was told.

    Anyway the one we built is quite simple in principle and works in almost every situation i have found to test it in, from puddles, gravel, deep mud (which was a bit scary) :LOL: dort roads, steep camber roads etc....it certainly does have it limitations but if you know then then it's quite easy to prepare to avoid them.
  8. hey Stewy ,

    My 10 yr old daughter and I read yours and Lenna's threads ...

    It bought tears to our eyes ... and next thing we would b smiling ..
    It's definetely an inspirational story that not only 'other riders' would want
    to know/read about ...
    If I had read this story 2 yrs ago ( when I had nothing to do with bikes) ..
    I still wouldve had the same gut wrenching reaction I had reading it today,

    Lennas determination and courage is awesome ...
    the bag she made out of her jacket was great , many other people wouldve just turfed the jacket ..

    And your support/effort/enthusiasm/ in getting the
    new improved 'bike with stabilizer arms 'up and running for her is just FANTASTIC !!

    And not forgetting all the work all your friends did to help , brilliant job by everyone involved ...

    :applause: cheers

    Sharlene and Mahnie
  9. I was looking at that bike on the potato run, I have also studied the piccys,
    a simple solution to the varying road surfaces would be to put little high speed hydraulic lifters inside the tubes above the wheels that contact the ground, It would then compensate for various levels and would be quite cheap to do,
    You have all done an excellent job,
  10. Hmmm, interesting idea.....sent you a pm, we are heading away at end of june for about 2 months, but would be interested to discuss the idea when i get back.

    cheers stewy :)