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Getting bike into ute tray

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by quixotic, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. Hi guys,

    I'm picking up my ZZR250 tomorrow morning from the owner (about 100km's away) because I'm not confident riding and don't have anyone to ride it home for me, we are looking to take it home in my BF's Navara tray.

    Could anyone advise the best way of:

    * getting the bike into the tray (we thought we would use two steel planks we have at home)

    * how to tie the bike down (i bought some rachet straps but not sure where to lash them to the bike)

    Any advice would be much appreciated,



    Cheers, E x
     
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  2. Not too sure about getting the bike into the Ute i'm afraid, I suppose running it up steel planks would do the job, never had to do it myself. As far as securing it though with the rachet straps, my friend used to use one from each side of the handlebars to the side of the trail and then one that went from one side of the trailer to the other across the seat to hold it all in place.

    So in total three were used. Perhaps if there's no where to secure it on the handlebars, you could try somewhere between the tripleclamp and handlebars on the forks. Someone else care to add in help here? My knowledge is all used up now. :)
     
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  3. Ask Ktulu, he's loke the Magiver of doing that kind of stuff :)
     
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  4. Also if you are securing it with ratchet straps get someone to sit on it when it is in the try while you strap them down, just cos it will compress the suspension and make the load more stable.
     
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  5. Put it into gear when its on the ute as well - minor point but will assist with keeping forward/rear motion down whilst travelling. Take a few rags or something soft should the tie-downs go over the seat or near fairings or other bits that could scratch or get damaged.
     
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  6. when i bought my bike from the shop.......they loaded it on to the back of a ute to deliver to my house with a bike ramp.....so if your metal planks look anything like these (which are proper bike ramps that people buy for about 200bux).......then u should be fine.....

    [img:400:400:4382f8beef]http://www.bikebiz.com.au/contents/media/factory-racingramp.jpg[/img:4382f8beef]

    [img:400:400:4382f8beef]http://www.bikebiz.com.au/contents/media/drc-hybridramp.jpg[/img:4382f8beef]

    as for tying it,......im not sure how they tied it down.......but i know they used things like this.......so once again, if your ropes and stuff look similar to this......then should be ok.....

    [img:400:400:4382f8beef]http://www.bikebiz.com.au/contents/media/Ancralite-tiedown.jpg[/img:4382f8beef]

    [img:400:400:4382f8beef]http://www.bikebiz.com.au/contents/media/gorillasgrip-tiedowns.jpg[/img:4382f8beef]

    all the best!
     
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  8. i second that, also put it on a angle in the tray with front tyre on corner snuggly and sit on it to tie down..
    when mine broke down i was lucky to find a nice high mound of dirt and was riding with two strong men :grin:
     
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  9. Mate don't put anything over the seat. Seats are for bums not tight straps. Toss socks towing Co did that to my ZZR and tore a hole in the seat and permantly crushed the foam or whatever making it permantly manky looking.

    I've transported dirt bikes for 1000's of km's and all I had was a trailer, ramp, 3 x pull down bike straps and a plastic oil bottle to stop over-compression of the front shocks. Never had a problem except for an over helpfull mate who forgot the oil bottle and over tightened the bar straps. There goes the fork seals :cry:
     
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  10. find a depression (eg where driveway meets the road) in the ground and reverse the tail gate down. it will make the gate much closer to the ground. a thick and wide plank of wood is adequate as a ramp. line it up straight and do some practice runs just as far as the rear tyre starts getting on the ramp. then hit it in one brisk final run all the way onto the tray. if the tray is long enough, keep the bike straight. it's easier to unload.

    attach the straps to the clip-on mounts and go as wide on the tray as you can. i normally strap the left side down slightly loose but to the point where it won't stand up straight. then as a mate compresses the front, i tighten up the right hand side. 2 quality rated straps, properly tensioned up on the front is adequate. recheck the straps after the first 5 minutes down the road.
     
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  11. find a depression (eg where driveway meets the road) in the ground and reverse the tail gate down. it will make the gate much closer to the ground. a thick and wide plank of wood is adequate as a ramp. line it up straight and do some practice runs just as far as the rear tyre starts getting on the ramp. then hit it in one brisk final run all the way onto the tray. if the tray is long enough, keep the bike straight. it's easier to unload.

    attach the straps to the clip-on mounts and go as wide on the tray as you can. i normally strap the left side down slightly loose but to the point where it won't stand up straight. then as a mate compresses the front, i tighten up the right hand side. 2 quality rated straps, properly tensioned up on the front is adequate. recheck the straps after the first 5 minutes down the road.
     
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  12. find a depression (eg where driveway meets the road) in the ground and reverse the tail gate down. it will make the gate much closer to the ground. a thick and wide plank of wood is adequate as a ramp. line it up straight and do some practice runs just as far as the rear tyre starts getting on the ramp. then hit it in one brisk final run all the way onto the tray. if the tray is long enough, keep the bike straight. it's easier to unload.

    attach the straps to the clip-on mounts and go as wide on the tray as you can. i normally strap the left side down slightly loose but to the point where it won't stand up straight. then as a mate compresses the front, i tighten up the right hand side. 2 quality rated straps, properly tensioned up on the front is adequate. recheck the straps after the first 5 minutes down the road.
     
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  13. With the dirt bikes we attach the ratchet straps around the h/bars near the triple clamp. Attah them to the two front corners of the ute.

    If you can get a fork protector use it to stick between your wheel and the bolts that hold the front wheel arch on.

    Tighten the ratchet straps and then tie a rope through the rear wheel across the two end corners of the ute :)

    Make sure that it is very secure before driving off, might be in a spot of bother otherwise :grin:
     
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  14. If you are transporting the bike because you are not yet confident riding it, I'd suggest that you try rolling it up the ramp (with whatever additional help you can muster).

    I've transported my scoot in a trailer (with ramps) a few times and can tell you from experience that it is not easy to give it enough gas to get it up the ramp, keep it balanced on an incline and stop upright in time.

    With the tie down tips in previous posts, you should be ok.

    Enjoy.
     
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  15. Thank you for all the replies (esp the one about putting straps over the seat).

    The rachet straps look just like the ones in the picture, but the steep planks are like the ones builders use for scaffolding...hope they'll be okay.

    Thanks diggerdave for the advice, I won't be attempting to kangaroo hop my way up into the back, i'll walkit up as suggested - with help.

    Do you think i should put the bike on the centre stand or wil the side one do fine?

    Cheers,

    E x
     
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  16. Thank you for all the replies (esp the one about putting straps over the seat).

    The rachet straps look just like the ones in the picture, but the steep planks are like the ones builders use for scaffolding...hope they'll be okay.

    Thanks diggerdave for the advice, I won't be attempting to kangaroo hop my way up into the back, i'll walkit up as suggested - with help.

    Do you think i should put the bike on the centre stand or wil the side one do fine?

    Cheers,

    E x
     
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  17. when we did it we used the side stand, might be wrong but worked for us :grin:
     
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  18. i could be wrong, but personally i would go the side stand. if you use the centre stand and have to brake hard... it might 1. rock forward off the stand. 2. end up in the centre console. plus you have less of the bike contacting the back of the ute.
     
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  19. +1. Side stand. Use the side stand.

    If the steel planks are steep it will be a bit harder to push up onto the ute - bear it in mind. If you had something longer it is usually easier but longer stuff usually flexes which is not good!
     
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  20. There's a lot said here I don't agree with. I have a VF1000 which weighs a lot . I have put it on and off the back of my falcon ute several times and I don't have to worry about it moving at all when I drive. Here are a few tips:

    I use a long metal plank that the builders left me after a renovation. If I face the ute downhill I can let the bike roll and control it with the front brake.

    I always put the bike is straight even though the tailgate won't close properly. I find its much more stable than if its sideways. I tie up the tailgate after the bike is in.

    I leave the bike in gear once its on the ute. I don't use the sidestand or centrestand but strap it down in a vertical position.

    I use two straps on the front around the bottom of the forks. I DON"T strap it down with the suspension compressed. The suspension on the bike works well to soak up any bumps. However, I do strap down the rear suspension due to a lack of places to put the straps. Once I do this its solid and never moves.

    Getting it off is more difficult as you need someone to watch the rear tyre so it doesn't go off the side of the ramp. Its OK when you put it on as the rear wheel follows the front.

    Good luck with moving it.
     
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