Welcome to Netrider ... Connecting Riders!

Interested in talking motorbikes with a terrific community of riders?
Signup (it's quick and free) to join the discussions and access the full suite of tools and information that Netrider has to offer.

Genuine parts,,too expensive?

Discussion in 'Bling and Appearance' at netrider.net.au started by streetmaster, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. After a recent smidsy, I got paid out & started to repair the bike myself.
    $35 for a genuine 'Kawasaki' sticker. No way, I'll get my own made (y)
    017_zps01c9f4b2.

    Some other bits I've done to the Z are,

    Rim stickers off Ebay
    019_zpsc9144522.

    Billet brake reservoir cover and levers.
    024_zps29660710.



    Frame plugs, Puig screen & fitted a 2012 lower cowl (orange), Ventura rack.
    022_zpsc0846cc7.
     
     Top
    • Like Like x 6
  2. Couldn't agree more!!
    Right side fairing $350
    inner top fairing $190
    Ninja sticker $25

    Bought all three from tyga, $190 delivered.
     
     Top
  3. Upper R/H cowl, (no sticker)
    Lower R/H cowl,
    Lower L/H cowl,
    Total cost $536.00!!!! (all genuine, not available elsewhere)
     
     Top
  4. yep, sometimes you HAVE to buy genuine
     
     Top
  5. Now its a Kwikasfuki,get out there and get rid of those chicken strips.
     
     Top
  6. Looking good (y)
    Yeah genuine parts not cheap....
     
     Top
  7. dont fall into that trap though...

    there are alot of parts that are cheaper then genuine...
    however believe it or not (and many don't realize)
    there are quite a few parts that are actually cheaper genuine...
    (however i admit its only a recent occurrence)

    an example of this is Yamaha brake disc's
    many go straight to aftermarket (and lets avoid the Chinese $40 specials, im talking decent known brands) however the Yamaha are cheaper in many cases. the same goes for sprockets, oil filters, piston rings etc... and if not cheaper, only a few dollars more expensive

    alot of the parts that wear and are made to be replaced are actually cheaper genuine,
    and it's only getting better as the manufacturers are trying to earn a bigger share... this is why alot have also started to sell their own oil.



    so my advice is always price genuine and aftermarket...
    that being said, fairing and decals are much more expensive genuine... but they do have a better fit and finish. plus the materials are a better then the majority of aftermarket parts offered (not all)

    another word of advise, for a full faired bike. if you are looking to replace the stickers.... price up the whole panel (if they are pre-installed) often it will only be $40-$80 more then just the stickers... a whole lot easier option and beats having a repaired/scratched painted panel
     
     Top
  8. I was looking at a couple of Australian suppliers for the screens. Base price is double what we paid from the US via eBay for exactly the same thing. And shipping isn't that much cheaper.

    Hope the US guy has another one, so I can replace mine :(
     
     Top
  9. i used to own a yamaha.
    it worked out a lot cheaper to buy genuine parts from Canada, including postage, than it did to buy them from here.
    close to a third the cost from memory.
     
     Top
  10. a suzuki headlight assembly, genuine replacement from Peter Stevens quoted 700 bucks.

    i could buy a whole ****ing suzuki for that much.

    hong kong, 150 shipped. genuine, fell of the back of a container
     
     Top
  11. Anyone know a good place for stickers/vinyls in melb? I'm missing a couple from the belly pan on my cbr
     
     Top
  12. yep...
    as i said parts that are meant to be replaced.

    i seem to remember a quote (cant track it down)
    from one of the main automotive founders...
    that he could give the cars for free, if they only bought genuine parts...


    though a few years ago a guy priced up a full bike from spare parts, the bike complete cost 2-3k the bike as parts cost 7k

    hehehe...

    still havent found that quote but found this one

    “With each replacement of parts, a car slowly becomes Chinese.”
    ***8213; Mr. Kuniyasu
     
     Top
  13. Bike shops double the price of spares to meet overheads.
     
     Top
  14. I'm also on a Z1000 forum & the guys in the states can't get over the prices we pay.
    Yeah, I know. New tyres & the second time out on them. :-({|=
    Funny though, I can't seem to get my Z1000 over as far as I can get [MENTION=34621]Greydog[/MENTION]s' Z1000 over!!! :rofl:
     
     Top
  15. Often the important question is not whether aftermarket parts are cheaper - but whether they're better than OEM.

    It's amazing how much corner cutting manufacturers do even on the most expensive models (the lack of braided brake lines being a perfect example).
     
     Top
  16. its amazing the lack of adr braided lines..................
    plus its only really beneficial to older brake lines or track work.

    that being said, yeah id expect a ducati or similar to come with braided lines
     
     Top
  17. Oi! :-s
     
     Top
  18. Not really. I only know of one Aussie manufacturer (HEL) so no real surprise they're the only ones that make ADR compliant braided lines.

    Certainly nothing stopping local distributors fitting them as part of their pre-delivery.
     
     Top
  19. actually after further reading.....
    braided lines are recommended to be replaced every 2 years,
    there is no real way or inspecting the liner,
    and the crimps are a weak point (i know from working with hydraulics, how easy it is to screw up a crimp, and how hard it is to tell if it's good)
    also unless they have the plastic outer coating, the dirt gets in the braid and really wears the liner even quicker)

    (the last two pints dont apply to the adr hoses. as they have quality ends and an outer coating........ but they are not cheap)

    seems the majority of what i read says they are great for the track,
    but a bad idea for the road....
     
     Top
  20. What have you been reading?

    Standard rubber lines are supposed to be replaced every 4 years (though noone ever does). However I fail to see how stainless/Teflon lines could last for less time than plain steel/rubber OEM ones, and in fact seem to recall that the recommended replacement for braided is more like 10 years. Given that braided lines are often cheaper than OEM I really don't see a reason not to use them (which is why every vehicle I own has them fitted).
     
     Top