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FZR250 Or RGV250?

Discussion in 'Bike Reviews, Questions and Suggestions' at netrider.net.au started by josh_182, Aug 31, 2006.

  1. Well guys by December - January I should have enough money to buy a bike :) I like the sportier bikes the FZR's and RGV's ( CBR's are way too pricey ) I should have about $4800, hopefully get a bike for about $3,500 - $3,800 then have the rest for gear an insurance and maybe rego if bike doesn't come with it. I'll prob have to get the spirit over to Melb to find a bike as there aren't many road bikes around down here. just wondering if some guys who have had these bikes could let me know what they're like and how they go. I'm 6'0 84kg. People say the more sporty bikes r uncomfortable for guys over about 5"10 but I'll see what u guys think and what I think. Thanx to anyone who replies, Josh.


     
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  2. What bikes have you ridden?

    A RGV is very dangerous if you've got big balls and not much road bike experience. I'd suggest something more like a RD250/RG250/RZ250 as your first road going 2 stroke if thats the path you want to follow. You could also look at a 125 like the Aprilia or Cagiva.

    I highly recommend RGV's having owned a mint one that never gave me trouble but not as your first 2 stroke.
     
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  3. The RGV can still be a good bike for a learner as long as the learner respects it. As long as the learner spends time getting comfortable with the bike and learning the power curve it will be the sort of bike that a learner would keep after they come off their Ps. It is a higher maintenance bike, you can do much of the servicing yourself and the running costs will be lower than a 4 stroke 250.

    I don't know much about the FZR, but being a 250 4 stroke they would be well thrashed, possibly fairing damage and what not. The Cagiva Mito are a bit of a hit and miss, I've heard that some of them are of dodgy build quality, others haven't missed a beat.

    When the time is right, try out all the bikes and see what you feel suits you best.
     
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  4. In case you didn't realise there's a huge difference between a 2-stroke 250 like the RGV and a 4-stroke, 4 cylinder like the FZR. The RGV may be under 260cc but it's not the best choice to learn on - it's been proven statistically in Victoria that the 3 biggest risk factors for learners in their first year are: being under 25, male, and owning a 2-stroke 250 like the RGV (that's why they're banned in LAMs states). A 2-stroke also isn't a good idea unless your good mechanically, servicing a 4-stroke is far simpler to do yourself. There may also be a huge difference in the cost of insurance. Really there's stuff all difference in performance between the FZR and CBR so if you can find a FZR in your price range that's in good condition go for it.
     
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  5. RGVs like most of the 250s around are getting a bit long in the tooth. Finding a good quality example is getting harder. Most would be around 30,000km at which point you have to look at having the cylinder bores recoated with nikasil which works out to around $800. You also have to worry about crank case seals, gearbox etc. Personally I wouldn't bother for anything other than a track toy for the mechanically minded.
    Smart money is to buy something newer like a VTR250 or similar. Or if you can afford it, the Aprilia RS250 before it becomes extinct.
    Buying a decade old bike is playing russian roulette with your finances.
     
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  6. im guessing this is going to be your first bike. if so, stay away from the rgv coz im sure ull end up being too cocky and might get hurt. get your skills up first so the bike i recommend for you would be a cbr. why?
    its more reliable, easier to handle and small and it gives u plenty of fun until you upgrade.

    ride safe
     
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  7. RGV = Death on wheels.. so i heard..
     
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  8. RGv are great. They are not that dangerous, its up to u as the rider to respect and ride it within ur limits.
     
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  9. They aren't dangerous. Not any more dangerous than a 600, 750 or 1000 sports bike. But they are AS dangerous as these bikes. That's the kicker.

    It's in a different league to a CBR or a VTR 250.

    I had an NSR 250 after I wrote off my first fj1100, It was insane. It's power wheelie in 2nd as it came into the power band, power slide out of corners and would sit on it's 13,500 RPM redline with me (at 100 KG's) doing 195 KPH in top gear.

    Not the best thing to learn on, 2 stroke GP replica's are exactly that. Race bike replica's. Sex on wheels but you'll end up in trouble if you haven;t had much saddle time.

    Treat a 250 stroker like you would a race prepped 600 and you'll be fine :p

    Tim.
     
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  10. They aren't dangerous. Not any more dangerous than a 600, 750 or 1000 sports bike. But they are AS dangerous as these bikes. That's the kicker.

    It's in a different league to a CBR or a VTR 250.

    I had an NSR 250 after I wrote off my first fj1100, It was insane. It's power wheelie in 2nd as it came into the power band, power slide out of corners and would sit on it's 13,500 RPM redline with me (at 100 KG's) doing 195 KPH in top gear.

    Not the best thing to learn on, 2 stroke GP replica's are exactly that. Race bike replica's. Sex on wheels but you'll end up in trouble if you haven;t had much saddle time.

    Treat a 250 stroker like you would a race prepped 600 and you'll be fine :p

    Tim.
     
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  11. Thats a pretty good comparison...
    You need to respect it for what it is. This is the dangerous part, because its easy to forget, especially as a learner.

    Mo
     
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  12. I thought the RGV was a great first bike, if you can keep your Mr Sensible hat on. If you aren't one of those who plans to upgrade as soon as you get off restrictions the RGV will keep you entertained for many years.

    The FZR will probably be cheaper when you count maintenance and running costs if money is a problem. I wouldn't say that they are very common though even in VIC.

    Hahah I'm more concered that you're gonna try to buy a bike and take it back to tassie? I'm assuming you're not coming over for that long?
     
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  13. Due to the nature of 2-strokes do you have to give the RGV a fair caning to keep the plugs happy? Or will it be happy enough being somewhat sedate with the occasional burst to keep things happy?
     
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  14. You can do buy different temperature plugs or even pull the plugs out and give them a clean regularly if you are worried about fouling plugs.
     
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  15. I think an fzr would be a far more enjoyable experience. 2strokes just sound like too much trouble, or maybe I'm getting old...
     
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  16. Not a 2 stroke

    hey mate,

    My first bike was a NSR150 SP (Honda) 2 stroke. My advise would be not to get a 2 stroke. Not only do they sound horrible and are a biatch to fix, the RGV's are a really fast 2 stroke and if you haven't riden before try something esle. Those FZR's are great 250's. Cheap to run and fix, and very reliable. On the plus side as well they have goosd re-sell value in the learner market.

    Cheers,

    Jake
     
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  17. RGV is a great bike but your brave to want to own one living in Tasmania and being a learner, with all the road kill, blind bends and gravel mid corners. An RGV is not a learner toy the FZR is.
    Any bike you buy on your L's will be a blast even if its a postie bike unless of course you've been riding MX since you were 6 years old, don't be fooled into thinking that you will be good enough to ride it well straight away.
    Before they made RGV's illegal for NSW L plater's I had 5 L platers on RGV250 living near by none of them made it to the black licence only 1 survived and none crashed into cars they all just lost them due to inexperance and they were all new fresh bikes not 20yo used POS.
     
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  18. Which rgv we talking about vj21 or vj22. Ive owned a vj21 and is a good learners bike if you know your limits.I did alot of traffic work it was ok with plugs.I currently own a RS250 which is horrible in traffic but tops on the twisties. Which now im selling for a bigger bike with crap loads more torque.Forgot to note ride position is putting most of your weight on your wrists and your lower back cops it. I did 800km on the weekend on the rs250 and i was ok due to only owning these two stroker racers. Ive also owned a rg250 which has got a little bit of power & a decent riding position but the suspension lacks a little. You havnt mentioned your mechanical ability or willing to learn about the two stroke scene. also what style of riding your into, also your riding history / ability. The Rs in MY OPINION handles far better then the vj21.Has adjustable suspension front and rear whcih you can "tune "in to suit for needs.I get about 160km tank for fuel and top the oil up ever 250km But i can check it at 500km intervalls and still have oil left.The rs has a big tail section to fit a set of wet weather gloves and wet weather suit(ive fitted my dryrider suit and gloves in). Just in case a weekend ride turns in to rain. The vj21 have a different powervalve set up compared to the vj22 which should be removed every 4000km to be de-carboned and check grub screw holding the valves. Id also do the expansion chambers too.Id personally say that the time spent on the strokers are much well spent as the performance on such a small bike is rather high.These bikesare very quick and you will crash if you are not carefull,But if you are carefull you have the oportunity to flame some of the bigger bikes thru the twisties. SORRY FOR THE LONG POST.
     
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  19. Go for an earlier fzr (non deltabox frame) or a cbr400 'single R' early model.

    Both of these bikes are far better value than the later models, and most of the differences between these and later models are in the cosmetics.

    The problem with most of the rgv's is that they've been through many learners hands, and are a bike that needs more maintenance and care than most learners are willing to give them. Even low km vj23's (last model) can give unexpected grief, mostly due to the design of the powervalves.

    As lukewarm says, a stroker for your first bike down in tassie is a bit of a gamble.

    Do it right the first time! Other bikes you should seriously consider IMO are GPX/ZZR and the Spada.
     
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