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First Bike-Aprilia RS125, Cagiva Mito 125 or Hyosung GT250R?

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by ///M cubed, Apr 12, 2006.

?
  1. Aprilia RS125

    100.0%
  2. Cagiva Mito 125

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Hyosung GT250R

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Hi all,

    I'm brand new to the forum, thanks for having me.

    I'm currently looking for my first bike, and I've found a few that I like. Ultimately I would really like to have a Ducati 748iSS :cool: , but that's definately down the track.

    I want to put 2k cash on the bike and loan out the rest over a 2 year period, considering I'm a uni student and lump sums of cash are a bit hard to come by.

    I like the Aprilia RS125, the Cagiva Mito 125 and the Hyosung GT250R.

    I'm thinking the Hyosung for practicality at the moment, as it's 4 stroke and considerably cheaper than the 125's.

    The reason I'm considering the 125's is a lot of people I talk to say that the best riders are generally ones that can ride the wheels off their 125's. Taking Valentino for example.
    I'd like to grow to be a good rider, and MAYBE put in some track time later on. Really though, I just need a bike that's going to last me well for 3 years to get me out of uni, and have reasonable resale value after that period. I'm looking for reliability and ease of maintenance aswell.
    I would like a bike that I'm not going to get sick of, but because I'm not experience with riding on the road I can't just tell by looking.



    I've had a few years experience riding trail bikes, with some racing experience when I was younger.

    I'd really appreciate some opinions of people other than the ones trying to sell me the bikes. I'd go ask Barry (Sheen) if he was still around, bless him.

    Thanks for your help in advance.
    :grin:
     
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  2. If you want something that's going to be reliable for 3 years and still give a good resale value then where's the "none of the above" option. Seriously I wouldn't be borrowing money for your first bike, use the 2 grand you have to buy an old, reliable, 4-stroke 250 then start saving to buy a decent bike when your restrictions end (you should get pretty much all of your 2 grand back).
     
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  3. If you're looking for resale value, forget a new bike.
    If you're looking for easy maintenance, forget 2-strokers.

    Like jd said, get a cheap bike, learn the skills and make your mistakes on that, and when you get off restrictions then you can start looking for a dream bike.
     
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  4. +1 vote for cheap unfaired shitter you can toss down the road a couple of times.

    Then again, I reckon the Mito's a very horny looking little bike. Balls-all practicality but great to look at.
     
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  5. Have a read of many of the new rider threads and see how often people complain of even a 250 being too underpowered; you might love the buzz of a 125 but you'd be sick of it before the end of the driveway.

    I've voted for the Hyosung, because that's my 'best case' choice, but I agree with the boys; get a banger, learn, do your restricteds and save your precious pennies for the Ducati in a couple of year's time.....

    Oh, and welcome to our fabulous forum..
     
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  6. There's a Postie for sale down the road for about a grand... ?

    Thanks for the advice so far. Much valued and appreciated.
    I COULD pay cash, but what I've learned in my degree so far has convinced me to invest the capital I have.

    I don't think I'll be doing too much dropping around where I live. It's 60k everwhere.

    I've heard conflicting stories about the restrictions too. The apprentice of one of the sparkies working for my dad got a brand new Daytona 600 for his first bike when he was 17. I didn't have too much of a chance to ask him how, but he said he just did the Q-Ride courses.

    Any more light on this?

    Keep the advice coming guys, I really appreciate it... :D
     
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  7. Have you ever actually owned a two-stroke?
     
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  8. +1 for the Hyo

    Get the postie!!

    It'll teach you just as much as any of the bikes you've mentioned, and won't bring a tear to your eye when you bin it (and yes, you can crash just as easily in 60 zones!)
     
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  9. If you're asking me, yeah.

    I had Suzuki 2 stroke dirt bikes since I was 9.


    1 vote for postie noted. :LOL:
     
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  10. No, I'm asking the people who always say that unless you're a mechanic forget owning one because they're so hard to maintain, biggest myth going around this site I've seen.
     
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  11. Oh ok,

    Yeah good point. I never had any problem whatsoever with my 2 strokes. Admittedly, they were weekenders only, not daily riders.

    Is there any way I can change the poll to add "Postie down the road for about 1k"?

    It would be interesting to see the votes, haha.
     
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  12. (/M)^3, you crack me up. :wink:

    1. If it is all 60kph around where you are, and you plan to stay under that, why are you even considering these bikes? Buy the postie.

    2. Assuming you do creep up to 61km/h by accident - no-one plans to drop their bike. They do it stationary at the lights. They do it when the bitumen heats and the sidestand subsides. They do it when some clown comes through a stop sign and they get cleaned up. They do it when they take a corner at 61km/h and hour and find gravel on the corner. No-one wishes you to drop your bike, but its odds on that you will.

    3. You'll need to invest your capital in an asset that appreciates at a rate greater than the interest on the loan plus the depreciation on the bike - including the depreciation that arises when you drop it. Please PM me with details of the investment plan.

    Exec summary -

    • you'll certainly go over 60,
    • you'll probably drop it at some stage, and
    • you'll be spewing that you should have paid cash.
    Get a loan when you know how to ride. For now, buy a cheapy and have fun.

    Chairman's rule for financial survival - don't finance hobbies. If you can't pay cash, find another past-time. This rule is subject to the rider that finance is OK if you're prepared to eat the difference between the write-off value and the loan payout value.
     
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  13. (/M)^3, you crack me up. :wink:

    1. If it is all 60kph around where you are, and you plan to stay under that, why are you even considering these bikes? Buy the postie.

    2. Assuming you do creep up to 61km/h by accident - no-one plans to drop their bike. They do it stationary at the lights. They do it when the bitumen heats and the sidestand subsides. They do it when some clown comes through a stop sign and they get cleaned up. They do it when they take a corner at 61km/h and hour and find gravel on the corner. No-one wishes you to drop your bike, but its odds on that you will.

    3. You'll need to invest your capital in an asset that appreciates at a rate greater than the interest on the loan plus the depreciation on the bike - including the depreciation that arises when you drop it. Please PM me with details of the investment plan.

    Exec summary -

    • you'll certainly go over 60,
    • you'll probably drop it at some stage, and
    • you'll be spewing that you should have paid cash.
    Get a loan when you know how to ride. For now, buy a cheapy and have fun.

    Chairman's rule for financial survival - don't finance hobbies. If you can't pay cash, find another past-time. This rule is subject to the rider that finance is OK if you're prepared to eat the difference between the write-off value and the loan payout value.[/quote]

    Thanks for the advice, I'll keep it in mind when I'm writing my PhD.
    You don't need to school me about appreciation and depreciation, and someone who claims to have as much "knowledge" about finance should know that a lump sum investment is infinately more beneficial than monthly payments. :idea:

    I've been riding dirtbikes since I was 9, I'm starting to get a bit of an idea of how to ride by now.

    Come visit my town, have a look at the 60 zones.

    Again, your advice is appreciated.
    Oh, and thanks for the schooling Rivkin.
    ;)
     
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  14. Are you implying the Mito is slower? Having ridden a Mito and VTR-250 back to back over several days last week (blown fuel pump relay on The Brick), the Mito definitely feels much quicker in a straight line with the obvious exception of that first 25 feet off the line. I'd certainly not be bored with it any time soon...if ever. It also keeps pulling a lot harder over about 80km/h even with my 2m 100kg frame on board. Both bikes had dropped a tooth from the front sprocket.

    But more interestingly the handling and braking differences are much more pronounced than I'd expected making the Mito a lot more fun through the "twisties".

    The Mito, of course, sounds like an angry bee and the VTR sounds pretty similar to it's big brother with an after market pipe...if that's your thing. :)

    How similar to the GT-R is a VTR? Anyone?

    One other thing to keep in mind is that the Italian machinery is...well...Italian. :) One of the coolant hose clamps was already badly rusted on the Mito.
     
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  15. The Hyosung site says they have the same V-Twin engine.
     
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  16. You're welcome. I look forward to a credit in the preface. Does your doctoral certificate arrive when the cheque clears, or do they accept Paypal?

    I think you're missing my point. I appreciate that you were riding before Agostini got his first helmet, and that all the cars on the Sunshine Coast are padded with sponge-rubber and limited to 5 km/h. It won't alter the fact that, if you drop it, you've lost a significant slice of the value of the investment. And, you've still got a loan to pay out.

    Hey, its your choice. That's the great thing about a free market. You proposed a plan for funding the purchase - I gave you my opinion. I'm sure if you ask enough people you'll find someone who confirms your thinking. After all, that's why we have consultants.

    Rivkin? Nah. He gave advice and now he's dead. I give advice and look...I'm still typing!

    Cheers.
     
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  17. Hm,
    Education from every angle... Amazing.

    I didn't know you could buy Doc's from my uni. I'll definately look into that one. Maybe that's what I should invest for.

    I've been riding for 10 years, not 10's of hundreds.

    I'm not from the Gold Coast. Well actually, I was born there. Shit hole. You'd be lucky to see a crippled 80 year old amputee move slower than 5km/h in that place.

    Yeah, I could drop it. I could also repair it. And if people get hit because of other people, what's stopping it happening to anyone that's got a loan for their bikes?

    No comment on Rene, sounds like you knew him better than I did. I don't want to speak ill of the dead.


    Cheers.
     
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  18. Me, no. Mate, yes.

    I don't think anyone ever says you have to be a mechanic to own a 2-stroker. But there's more maintenance with a 2-stroker than with a 4. Agree?
     
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  19. You live in QLD - why bother getting a 125/250? Do QRide and go out and get a 400/600, the investment will last longer - lots of decent second hand options. If you want to start somewhere, get the postie bike so you can get rid of it in 2 months after your sick of it.
     
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  20. Well, you have to fill the oil tank, so we can agree. :)

    Put a new sparkplug in every so often helps them out, not hard to do though.

    Their engines require rebuilding more frequently than fours but as far as day to day running on one left relatively standard and serviced correctly there isn't a lot you have to do you wouldn't also do to a four.
     
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