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Ducati 748 For Beginner

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' at netrider.net.au started by Flash Gordon, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. How ya goin....Just wondering if u guys can help me out.......Im a beginner, never owned a road bike before, but ive got a dirt bike ive ridden for about a year. Ive got my full licence and everything and im wanting to buy a bike. Ive got my money saved up, and the problem is i dont want to start on a 250. Ive got my mind set on a Ducati 748 2002. Im 21, 6', 85Kg Just wondering if this bike is too fast too start on. And if i do buy it, can i just kinda start slowly on it...Or does it not work like that...?Im not planning to hoon on it, i just love the look of it and want to cruise. Another thing does anyone know what the insurance would be like on this..Just an estimate....Ive got car insurance since 18 with no crash history aswell..Dont know if this effects anythin...Much appreciated


     
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  2. only reason i'd tell you not to buy it, is that it might not be the right bike for you. you cant buy a bike based solely on looks, there's a HUGE amount of difference between most road bikes.

    ideally, i'd tell you to buy something fairly cheap and get an idea of what you ride like/like in a ride. but if your not that patient, at least have a crack at a few bikes before buying the duke, and if you end up liking it much better, buy it :wink:


    you'll either take it easy and get used to it slowly and have an awesome riding career spanning many bikes and many roads. or you'll jump on it, decide that you dont need experience to go quick, and become road decoration :LOL:

    either way you'll have a blast :p :p
     
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  3. From my limited experience, I'd say start off small and work your way up. Theres nothing worse than getting a nice new bike only to make a small mistake and bust it up within the first few months. :?

    If you really wanna skip 250, possibly look at the Honda CBR400, VFR40, RFV400, Susuki GS500 (looks like a Gixxa sorta, but with a dirt bike rider seating style)

    Or maybe get your self a Motard with some oggy knobs.

    Its not so much your ability to hold the bike up that comes into question when you are new to the road, its more of the ability to know when to slow down, how to reconise a potential problem and prepare yourself accordingly so that you reduce the risk or prevent and accident happening.

    One thing I'm sure you've heard is the ammont of stories from most of the road riders speaking about n00bs who jump on their front brake only to loose their bike when they should of powered on. You have dirt riding experience which will help you in that respect, but theres nothing like speaking to the people who have been through the experiences to tell you what they could have done, or did do to prevent them from going down.

    Come along to some of the coffee nights at Southbank or some of the other weekly ones and chat to us, you'll find we're full of advice and you may find a good bike deal that will suit you.

    Believe me when I say, I'd love a stupidly powerful bike at times, just that sudden rush of Gs and the ability to quickly overtake, but when it comes to the corners, I know I'm still far too inexperienced to really use even a drop of the power properly.

    Save yourself some hassle, and bite down on your pride and get a nice cheap secondhand bike that you dont mind busting up too much, that way you can go to the stunt days and trackdays to learn a huge ammount without the worry of destoring a $10,000+ bike. :grin:
     
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  4. Well worth starting on a cheap smaller bike even if you dont have to.

    They are extreemly forgiving and teach you a lot.
     
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  5. Hmmmm thats something to think about hey...I guess you guys are right though, probs be stupid of me to buy the Duke...Sooo tempting though....Advise much appreciated
     
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  6. Insurance :shock: I'd say it would cost you more than the 748 :eek:
     
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  7. Only buy the Ducati if you can afford to repair it when you crash, and being your first road bike, and a very powerful one at that, the chances of having a crash-free experience with it are not in your favour.

    Buy a crappy road bike, even if it's just for a few months, 'cos any bad mistakes you make will probably happen within the first 6 months, and it's easier on the heart and wallet to scratch up a POS than it is your nice shiny new duke.
     
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  8. Too true.

    You make mistakes while learning, and although you have dirt bike experience, I imagine your road threat assessment skills are still a little green. Having a powerful bike to learn will amplify you mistakes: and that could have some serious consequences!

    That said, the 748 would be a bloody nice bike. Maybe something a little smaller for a few months first though, eh? ;)
     
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  9. :WStupid:

    Also, insurance is likely to be a killer. I was 25 when I bought my Duke....first year's insurance was $2500. As an under 25, I would suggest you look at that carefully.

    Servicing is more on a 4 valve Duke as well (I'm pretty sure the 748 is one, but don't quote me :wink: ).

    I would suggest working your way up....gives you something to look forward to when you're older :wink:

    :grin: :grin: :grin:
     
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  10. Listen mate, just get the bike if you really want it and can afford the insurance for it. And don't forget to get all the proper gear. I started off on an r1, which is a more twitchy bike. Just make sure you take it easy at first, and as long as you know the controls of a bike you're fine. A 250 cc is capable of killing you just as easily as an r1, so ride within your limits always.
     
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  11. Absolutely 100% spot on. Plus remember even just a simple tip over with duke can cost you a fortune.
     
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  12. It could be less expensive riding a different bike first.
    A friend dropped her 748R at low speed and it cost between $3 - 4000 to repair under insurance.
     
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  13. I hope you have very deep pockets because maintenance & servicing for the Duc's is ultra expensive as well (so I have heard).
     
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  14. Isn't that bad. Dukes only have to be serviced at 10,000 km's, not 6.

    One of the main reasons it costs so much, is to get at anything, you have to pull apart the engine.

    Plus parts aren't cheap.
     
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  15. Dukes are nice bikes - had a few in my life and still have two. Have had R1's all the way down to the old Kwaka Z1's (years ago) - which were a fad bike in their time. As you have been told, dukes need to be serviced every 10,000kms. In Melbourne - Moto One, Zagamis etc charge about $1,200.00 for a service (thats with out pulling off the heads). Belts need to be changed every 20,000 or 2 years (which ever comes first). If you are buying a second hand duke, you could be buying someone else's problem. To maintain a 'lemon' duke would cost a fortune. There are places around like the Melbourne Desmo Center - that do a better job and a little bit cheaper. I recommend you buy something smaller and cheaper - get experience and work your way up. Highly recommend advance riding coarses and even if you can afford it - superbike school, if you are going to be a serious bike rider on the roads regularly.
     
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  16. Dukes are nice bikes - had a few in my life and still have two (and always will). Have had R1's all the way down to the old Kwaka Z1's (years ago) - which were a fad bike in their time. As you have been told, dukes need to be serviced every 10,000kms. In Melbourne - Moto One, Zagamis etc charge about $1,200.00 for a service (thats with out pulling off the heads). Belts need to be changed every 20,000 or 2 years (which ever comes first). If you are buying a second hand duke, you could be buying someone else's problem. To maintain a 'lemon' duke would cost a fortune. There are places around like the Melbourne Desmo Center - that do a better job and a little bit cheaper. I recommend you buy something smaller and cheaper - get experience and work your way up. Highly recommend advance riding coarses and even if you can afford it - superbike school, if you are going to be a serious bike rider on the roads regularly.
     
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  17. Insurance would be at a premium for any bike you start out on really..
     
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  18. I've had a Ducati for some years now. I don't know where that rumour about them being expensive to service came from.
    Parts are no more expensive than for many Jap bikes and the shops all charge about the same for labour costs?

    Even Ducati at Homebush has made that point, in print, in Two Wheels magazine. :cool:

    OMG I just had a great idea (it happens sometimes I admit).
    Why don't you just phone up a Ducati dealership, speak to the workshop manager and ask him to quote you the prices for the costing of the minor and major services.
    Then you will know for sure and we gentle Netriders won't have to argue about it. :cool:
     
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  19. Flash Gordon, 748's are beautiful bikes :grin: and yes I am extremely biased. But IMO to really appreciate one you need to have some riding experience on the road first on something less expensive to repair (they don't crash cheaply!) and insure, do some courses as has been suggested and then buy the 748 and if you do don't forget to change its oil and filter at 5K intervals between servicing, they like that! We sometimes do it more often depending on the type of riding it and its big brother have had.

    PS 748's don't like cruising that is not what they were made for.
     
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  20. Mate I'd go the chook chaser/motad route. They are heaps of fun if set up right and just as quick through the twisties as some sports bikes in the right hands. Insurance will be a heap cheaper if its basically a XR or XT TT. Maint will also be much lower. It will teach you to ride/survive then with some saddle time up move to the Duk if it still turns you on. You may even want something else by then anyhow. At the end of the day we all have to ride within our limits and its experience or lack of where we find our limits.
     
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