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Dont forget your toothbrush...

Discussion in 'Adventure/Enduro' at netrider.net.au started by booga, Aug 4, 2008.

  1. Howdy again all,

    My last post was taken a different way, but not in a bad way, movin has provided a great post and without taking that away, or anyone elses enthralling stories and descriptions, I would start a more descriptive thread... ;)



    Thus this is the "What to take on tour" thread, and we can compile a cheaklist based on type and length of tours, ie, a day tour wont be needing a tent or sleeping bag... :grin:

    This will hopefully become a Sticky for this group, and will provide all the nessecary information as a refference and we wont forget those little things.

    As information comes to hand I might create a spreadsheet or something thats easier to read than going through a bunch of posts, and people can then d/l that and even print it out to tick off as they go along. :grin:
    (Hopefully Jason and Vic can provide us with a few kb's of space to host this file ;) )

    I will create them in Excel, but can be read by the free Open Office for those who dont have MS Office :)

    So... start posting ;)
     
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  2. Bit Americanized, but same stuff...

    Basic Motorcycle Camping List
    Tent
    Ground cloth
    Sleeping bag
    Sleeping pad
    LED headlamp, flashlight(s)
    Maps
    Water
    Non-perishable food
    Motorcycle Safety Reference Card

    It's amazing how far you can go and what you can do with just those items listed above (and some riders would forego the food and only grab some eats on the run). However, most camping motorcycle riders may not be inclined to travel that lightly. So...what follows is an expanded list for the rest of us. And it probably can't be emphasized too much that all items should be as small as possible. And whatever you bring needs to be compactible and/or sturdy enough to survive the adventures of motorcycle travel. Many of these items can be stored in Ziploc bags which will protect them from the elements and keep them readily identifiable which makes them easy to grab.

    Safety/Utility
    First Aid kit
    Water containers
    Toothpaste/brush
    Hand sanitizer (or soap)
    Thermometer
    Compass
    Knife
    Cord
    Hatchet
    Sunscreen
    Bug repellant
    Shovel
    Extra Ziploc bags
    Small trash bags
    Camera, batteries and extra media cards
    Clothes
    Underwear
    Socks
    Shorts
    Shirts
    Pants
    Light jacket
    Bathing suit
    Hat
    Sandals
    Towel
    Rain gear

    The quantity of a camping rider's stored clothing is highly personalized. Depending upon the extend of the trip, and the season, some motorcycle riders may bring very, very little in the way of extra clothes. Other's may bring more than what might seem necessary. Such choices are simply weighed against your storage capacity, and relative to the other camping items you will be carrying. Of course, if you are riding, camping and carrying gear for two persons on your bike, then you would likely be even more selective about what you will fit into your available storage space.

    Cooking
    Waterproof matches
    Stove/Fuel
    Cooking kit
    Cooking utensils
    Eating utensils
    Can opener
    Cleaning supplies
    Some bikers love to cook and bring along mini-kitchens. Some riders don't cook at all, and do not bring any cooking gear, choosing instead to eat on the road, eat prepared foods, or non-perishables, and/or eat groceries that do not require fire, pots and pans. What's your style?

    Basic Eating
    Water
    Food bars
    Nuts
    Coffee/tea
    Dehydrated items
    Pita bread (or any food that can be readily stuffed into motorcycle bags)
    This much abbreviated "Basic Eating" list only focuses on a small portion of the practical, non-perishable food items that are useful for a motorcycle camping rider. These noted items do not need to be cooked! Of course any perishable food items that you prefer are limited only by your cooling and cooking capacity. Heck, we went motorcycle camping one year in Southern California with an entire Thanksgiving meal, including all the trimmings! (Everything was pre-cooked at home and we only brought along enough turkey for the weekend). Even a small cooler can considerably expand your dining choices while picking up ice and groceries on the road.

    Motorcycle Gear
    Helmet
    Sunglasses
    Motorcycle jacket
    Motorcycle pants
    Motorcycle boots
    Motorcycle gloves
    Ear plugs
    Motorcycle kidney belt (really makes long-distance riding more comfortable)
    Rain Gear
    Tire pressure gauge
    Tire repair kit
    Pump or CO2 cartridges for tire inflation
    Tool kit
    Chain lube (No need for shaft- or belt-drive bikes)
    Duct tape
    Cell phone and charger (I will plug a charger in at a restaurant while traveling on the road)
     
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  3. In addition to the above, find it much easier to pack, self inflating mattress, sleeping bag, bag of clothes and tent in a BIG waterproof bag and strap to rack across top of panniers - so all stays dry.

    Panniers then full of the miscellaneous/heavier stuff - always take more tools than I know what to do with, Slime Pump very compact, and works well.

    Radio, iPod, camera and associated chargers.

    Comfort; a lightweight alloy camping chair, sandshoes and thongs

    And use a Coleman Petrol stove
     
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  4. The list from my Excel spreadsheet and picture of the bike loaded up for a full tour - http://aamu.smugmug.com/photos/310311319_wjTy9-L.jpg

    Full Tour

    Clothing

    Boots
    Flip-flops
    Socks
    Undies
    Thermals
    Hankies
    Wet Weather Pants
    Shorts
    Track Pants
    Hat

    Food / Drink

    Cooker & Gas
    Water Bottles
    Food
    Spork & Pliers
    Cup, Bowel, Pot
    Snacks
    Salt, Pepper & Sugar
    Knife
    Hand towel
    Plastic Bags

    Medical

    Asthma Spray
    Headache tablets
    Medical Kit
    Soap

    Bike Clothing

    Jacket
    Wet Weather Insert
    Winter Lining
    Jeans
    Winter Gloves
    Summer Gloves
    Clear Visor
    Tinted Visor
    Half Balaclava
    Ear Plugs

    Tools

    Shifter & Allen Keys
    Cable Ties
    Electrical Tape
    Chain Oil
    Fuses
    Tire Repair Kit
    Rubber Gloves
    Rags
    Pump
    Wire
    Multi Tool
    Velcro Straps

    Camping

    Tent / Swag
    Rubber Mallet
    Sleeping Bag
    Matrass
    Seat
    Torch
    Radio
    Toilet Paper
    Toothbrush & Paste
    Deodorant
    Matches
    Razor
    Mosquito Replant
    Towel
    Cord
    Batteries

    Maps & Notes

    Maps
    Notebook & Pen
    Book
    GPS
    Camera & Charger
    Phone & Charger
    Helmet Audio

    Before Leaving

    Spray gloves
    Routes to GPS
    POI's to GPS
    Music on GPS
    GPS on bike
    Setup Helmet Audio
    Manuals in panniers
    Charge Camera
    Charge Phone
    Check Torches & Radio

    Simple or Overnight (no camping)

    Clothing

    Boots
    Flip-flops
    Socks
    Undies
    Thermals
    Hankies
    Wet Weather Pants
    Shorts
    Track Pants
    Hat

    Food / Drink

    Water Bottles
    Snacks

    Medical

    Asthma Spray
    Headache tablets
    Medical Kit

    Bike Clothing

    Jacket
    Wet Weather Insert
    Winter Lining
    Dragin Jeans
    Winter Gloves
    Summer Gloves
    Clear Visor
    Tinted Visor
    Half Balaclava
    Ear Plugs

    Tools

    Shifter & Allen Keys
    Cable Ties
    Electrical Tape
    Chain Oil
    Fuses
    Tire Repair Kit
    Rubber Gloves
    Rags
    Pump
    Wire
    Multi Tool
    Velcro Straps

    Overnight

    Toothbrush & Paste
    Deodorant
    Razor

    Maps & Notes

    Maps
    Notebook & Pen
    GPS
    Camera & Charger
    Phone & Charger
    Helmet Audio

    Before Leaving

    Spray gloves
    Routes to GPS
    POI's to GPS
    Music on GPS
    GPS on bike
    Setup Helmet Audio
    Charge Camera
    Charge Phone

    EDIT: Updated the list a little.
     
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  5. What if we also ran a few ideas up the flagpole to rationalize the lists.

    For example Toecutter lists a hachet, and Roscoe lists a rubber mallet for camping. What if the rubber mallet was deleted, you could use the back of the hatchet for hammering tent pegs as well as cutting wood.

    Is there anything you would likely need a rubber mallet for that you could not do with a Hatchet?

    There has to be other items that can be used for more than one purpose.

    I reckon it is also worth discussing when traveling in a group things that need not be duplicated. For example you may not need more than one #2 phillips screw driver so perhaps one could carry that and a shifter and another carry... say the pair of tyre levers. Speaking of tyre levers, I have a pair made of forged aluminium; spoons one end, ring spannes the other.
     
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  6. Grif - thats a great idea, I was thinking if I would even carry either of those, but in the bush on a more serious offroad tour, I could see how they could be handy, so multipurpose'ing a tool is a great idea. :grin:

    And very +1 to the group tour, personally I wouldn't go on tour without at least 1 more person, and the person with the panniers can carry the world :rofl: (personal joke ;) ) ... but cartainly we could have an area on the spreadsheet that will have a need of only a set number of items per group. :grin:
     
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  7. Yup, no problems there.
     
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  8. First Aid Kit - overrated IMHO. There really isn't too much that can't be improvised from other items being carried. (Excluding personal meds eg. ventolin, insulin, adrenaline etc).
    Infection control - well you're already wearing gloves and the risk of any nasties being transmitted mouth-to-mouth is so negligible so as to be not worth considering.
    The only life saving kit that the average joe carries is possibly pressure/compression bandages for arterial bleeds, but these can be improvised from clothing. 100-mile-hour tape is great stuff. Triangular bandages - t-shirts, emergency blankets - useless, panadol - HTFU (won't touch the sides if anything remotely really painful occurs.
    Everything else is generally nice-to-have stuff that, if space is limited, can wait til you reach civilisation. May sound odd coming from an ex-ambo, but all I carry are shears and duct tape.
     
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  9. Good idea, Booga!

    We are big fans of cigarette socket type chargers on the bikes and have found a mini compressor that will pump up tyres from the bike battery.

    Spare helmet visor

    A good book

    Cable ties

    Spare bike key (in a safe and well remembered spot :wink: )

    Pencil and piece of paper (pens don't always work when you want them to and they have a tendency to run :shock: )

    A couple of pairs of medical type rubber gloves (so I don't get oil/crap/dirt in my gloves

    A soft pack of baby wipes and tissues

    If you normally wear contact lenses, don't forget to take a spare pair and your glasses!

    We have travel size toiletries and towels, so we don't use too much room

    Spare hairties

    I.C.E phone numbers in wallet

    Camera and spare memory card

    I'm sure I'll think of more soon :oops:
     
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  10. I am a fan of the EPIRB, the cost i am currently not sure off as they are changing the way they work, but if like me you ride scrub / outback solo they are good, keep the important stuff in a bum bag / pocket etc i would suggest as worse case you get thrown from the bike then you dont have to crawl to the bike / lift it etc.. also the whole water proof thing... but there is soo much info out there these days.. either way its always fun...
     
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  11. What if the chain snaps?

    Noone here has thought to bring a spare chain link. It's happened to me half a dozen times, when the chain jumps of the sprockets or it just comes apart for some unknown reason. If I hadn't been carrying a tiny little link I would've been extending my trip by days [ and it was only half hour from home ] :p
    I don't know if they have a motorcycle sized chain breaker but it beats trying to chisel off a bent link with a screwdriver and shifter against a piece of alluvial rock, breaking into pieces every time you hit it, flies buzzing around your sweaty forehead, blood oozing out of the index finger.......
    I think I'm going to go and buy one now!
     
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  12. Re: What if the chain snaps?

    I use a nit of the Ballards gear, they have a small chain brake/joiner which is used in conjunction with two ballards tyre irons that have socket holes cut in, so you can removing chain rivots, pins etc, as well as re joni them as required, on the spare link, good to carry a few of the size's, 520/530 etc, as it is often the mates you ride with your helping.. cheers al

    # I take no responsabililty for anyone that starts to look at the ballard catalog :)
     
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  13. I've been thinking of getting one of these too... Funny actually as I don't even have a mobile phone. I looked at getting a phone, but the coverage is pretty patchy down here. But I think I need something - I've heard a couple of stories of blokes coming to grief on an isolated road/track and waiting for hours in agony. One bloke probably wouldn't have been found at all if he hadn't of found a coke can which he put on the end of a stick and wiggled about.
     
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