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dodgy fuel in melbourne??

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' started by revhead998, Aug 6, 2009.

  1. $8000 for a cat and a fuel pump/lines? Eh?

    But yeah, that's why I always buy from major servos, and I prefer to use the Mobil near me as I've always had good fuel from them. And I never fill up just after a tankers filled the servo.
  2. Yep that does seem a bit unrealistic.
    I wonder what it does cost to replace the fuel lines.
  3. not sure of the price of a cat convertor, but i wouldnt look to far over $1000 Much much less if its older. fuel line is about $10-$20/m, plus joints etc. $8000 would near enough buy you a new, or near new engine complete.
  4. I had a cat conv. replaced last year on my late model commodore and it only cost $250.
  5. Yeah, but they said "up to $,8000" to replace. And you know the media, they will take the figure and use it out of context. I dare day $8k was a full engine replacement.
    However, the basic rule would still apply:
    Get replaced by a mechanic... $2,500 including all work done....
    Get replaced by a mechanic cause it's an insurance job... $5,000

    That's how the world works...
  6. Well if you need to replace the whole fuel line...and buy genuine parts from supplier...starting from an in tank fuel pump (should come with in tank fuel filter...if not that's extra), inline fuel filter, metal fuel line from the tank to the front of the car, fuel rail, fuel regulator, fuel injectors, probably get the fuel tank replaced (because it's part of the system :roll: ) or cleaned, as well as return fuel line...I reckon you'd be paying more then $1000 in parts due to overpriced genuine parts...then there's labour.

    I would say $8000 is for the more prestigious/luxury Euro/Jap cars...I don't think you'll be spending more then $4000 on a Ford or a Holden for the fuel line.

    phong =P~
  7. my baby is off the road for the next 16 days... it will be safe.

    My zzr and camry however could be interesting...
  8. Is that fellow from the VACC serious when he's asking motorists to look out for the dodgy fuel?

    How many of us are qualified to determine whether or not the fuel is (a) crappy, (b) that the spark plugs (what are they?) are fouled, (c) what the exhaust should look like?

    Sounds like the guy's trying to shift the onus back onto the motorist. But then the VACC is an industry body, not a consumer group.

    Hopefully the owners of the affected vehicles are able to send the supplier of the cruddy fuel the repair bill.

    As for insurance, I've never heard of a policy that covers mechanical failure. Which insurers offer this cover?
  9. First we are paying top dollar........ now they cant even guarantee quality.

    They haven't named any servo's yet.
  10. One of the ladies that my wife works with filled her 4x4 with petrol.

    Only problem there is that the thing was a diesel.

    The repair bill was $4000 and their insurance claim was rejected.

    They had to replace *everything* tank, lines, filters, injectors etc, etc.
  11. Yea there was a report on this on the 6pm news, the spark plug they showed looked ruined.

    True, you would thing they would simply ask those affected where they fueled up in the past couple of weeks and narrow it down for us.
  12. Maybe I’m missing something here but I always understood that engine seizure was due to lack of oil. Is this another case of accurate reporting?
  13. Probably due to their lack of experience/knowledge, 'engine stopping' and 'engine seizure' mean the same thing to them.
  14. the plugs that I saw on today tonight looked like they had been dipped in tooth paste.
  15. not always oil related but it could be due to the poor fuel quality the engines have leaned out and melted a piston and caused it to seize

    but then again who knows :idea:
  16. I bought fuel a few weeks ago out in country Vic; I don't know what the brand was or how much it cost as there was no indication. The place, the only one around, looked like a scene from Mad Max, and when the owner told me to wheel the bike to the other bowser, I saw that the one I had pulled up beside had broken glass and was rusty.

    Oh, and the owner was drunk!

    I was rather attentive to my bike's performance for a few kms after leaving there! But the fuel turned out fine and I learnt all about the guy's life, both the facts and how he felt about them!
  17. No, that would make too much sense.

    That's the best way to clean spark plugs. Little known fact: spark plugs usually never need replacing, a dab of toothpaste and they'll be good to go. You can also use honey, though you should thin it out with windex first. A 15 to 1 ratio works well.
  18. You'd wanna have some mechanical qualifications, TGM, to be dishing out bizarre home remedies like that...

    No offence if you do, just seems a bit far fetched! And with plugs costing a few bucks each, why would you bother?

    And you mean to tell me TT ran a dodgy fuel story without naming and shaming the heartless corporate giant or the probably ethnic and therefore manifestly untrustworthy servo operator? Another victory for quality investigative journalism!

    [insert standard poetic license disclaimer here!]
  19. Assuming that we're talking about engines that stop and fail to turn over, with symptoms of a seized engine, one theory is that this silicon compound that was introduced into the fuel may have caused a lockup due to inability to compress, perhaps? This can do all sorts of damage when a fast moving engine is suddenly forced to slow due to this.

    This is the problem when purchasing fuel from independant retailers. Often it's sourced from Asia, not refined down at Hastings or Coode Island, where you'd think that the QA in the production process would be more stringently applied.

    But who knows?