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News Dainese Introduces D-air Armor, Licenses it to Other Manufacturers

Discussion in 'Motorcycling News' started by NetriderBot, May 30, 2015.

  1. While we’ve recently seen some nice new advances in motorcycle helmet technology, it seems that motorcycle airbag clothing is also making some nice strides forward. Dainese has long provided riders it sponsors with D-air equipped gear and now it’s opening that opportunity up to other manufacturers by introducing (and licensing) their D-air armor system.

    This is actually a brand new product. Previously, their D-air systems were integrated into the hump on the back of track leathers. This system uses a back protector with the airbag integrated inside of it instead. The back protector houses the entire protection system— electronics, gas generator, wiring, battery and GPS.

    Vircos and Furygan will be the first companies to adopt the new Dainese technology. D-air Armor will protect Michele Pirro and Mattia Pasini (Vircos), as well as Mike Di Meglio, Johan Zarco and Sam Lowes (Furygan).

    “Furygan has been providing its own riders and clients with protective products of the highest possible level for 45 years,” said Jean Marc Autheman, Export and Racing Manager for Furygan. “When Dainese offered their new D-air Armor system, we took an immediate interest in the project and, after having been able to test and assess the performance of this technology, we gladly accepted the collaboration. Starting from the Catalunya GP, we will be able to offer our riders the first Furygan racing suits fitted with the D-air Armor system.”

    The only other creator of airbag products in MotoGP and other racing series is Alpinestars. Dainese move will most likely force Alpinestars to open its product up as well. But this can only be a good thing. The more data both companies collect and the more widespread the use of these safety systems in professional racing becomes, the faster the technology will makes its way to the public to use.

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